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March On Washington

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By Boston Globe | August 9, 1991
The U.S. Conference of Mayors is planning a nationwide march on Washington next April to protest what conference President Raymond L. Flynn calls the federal government's "callous neglect of the people of urban America."Flynn, mayor of Boston, called for "a new civil rights movement in America . . . an economic justice movement . . . that will wake people up and turn this country around."The proposed march is scheduled for Saturday, April 4, the anniversary of the death of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.The mayors who joined Flynn yesterday for a news conference, a bipartisan group of about 20, made it clear that they intend to make domestic policy and their urban agenda important political issues in the presidential campaign.
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NEWS
September 4, 2013
Your editorial on the 50 t h anniversary of the March on Washington contains many historical and statistical distortions ( "Unfinished business," Aug. 27). The Birmingham march led by Martin Luther King in 1963 deserves righteous indignation, but the editorial overlooks the compelling case made by Ann Coulter in Demonic that the march was unnecessary and opposed even by staunch Birmingham supporters of the civil rights struggle. The struggle largely had been won in the courts and at the ballot box. Birmingham Police Chief Bull Conner, for example, had been voted out of office.
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NEWS
By Kathy Lally | August 28, 2003
Forty years ago today, more than 225,000 people joined the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. gave the "I Have a Dream" speech that would from that time on evoke the aspirations of those civil rights protesters. The march was inspired by A. Philip Randolph, president of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters and vice president of the AFL-CIO, who had first advocated such a march in 1941. He called that one off after President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued an executive order prohibiting discrimination in hiring for defense plants.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 1, 2013
A striking contrast between the 1963 March on Washington and Wednesday's 50th anniversary celebration of it (and of Martin Luther King's historic "I have a dream" speech) was the visible unity and nonpartisanship of the first and the scarcity of both in the second. In the voices the other day of three Democratic presidents -- Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and Barack Obama -- and of not a single prominent Republican leader, past or present, the program seemed at times more a self-congratulatory Democratic rally.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Staff Writer | April 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- For Matthew Roberts, one of thousands of Marylanders who attended the gay rights March on Washington yesterday, participation in the event was a simple matter."
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | April 25, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The shiny silver ring through his lower lip matched the one through his right nostril, setting off nicely the five rings piercing his right ear and the safety pin in the left earlobe. Kellan Farshea, 27, is committed.A member in good standing of what they call the Leather Community, Mr. Farshea, a green-eyed man in a Mohawk haircut, had come all the way from London to the marbled chambers of the Mellon Auditorium to preach to the converted, to tell all about the two British men who were jailed for practicing consensual sex in the sado-masochistic style.
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau Nelson Schwarz contributed to this article | April 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Hundreds of thousands of gay rights demonstrators streamed through central Washington yesterday on a march where exuberance and sexual liberation overshadowed anger.Organizers hoped a huge turnout would boost their demands -- primarily for an end to the ban on gays in the military, protection pTC for homosexuals in a rewritten Civil Rights Act, increased funding to combat acquired immune deficiency syndrome and improvements in women's health care."Our demands are important, but what really matters is being here together, just being in the majority," said Rod Greenough of Salt Lake City, one of about 200 activists who had flown in from Utah.
NEWS
October 12, 1995
MAYOR KURT L. SCHMOKE, Rep. Kweisi Mfume and other politicians, local and national, are taking a big risk by endorsing Monday's Million Man March that is the brainchild of Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan."
NEWS
August 27, 1993
The Howard County NAACP plans to take 100 people to the 30th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington tomorrow.The Rev. Bowyer G. Freeman, president of the county branch, was too young to attend the 1963 march but says he's looking forward to attending this one.Mr. Freeman said the focus of this year's march will be on economic empowerment.The original march was billed as a "March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom."Two buses will leave at 8 a.m. from the First Baptist Church, 7504 Oakland Mills Road in Guilford.
NEWS
By Jason Song | March 23, 2003
Sherman Howell grew up in the segregated town of Arlington, Tenn., participated in civil rights marches in the 1960s and helped organize the March on Washington in 1963. When he was shopping for a home in 1971, he was looking for a place "that represented equality and respect." When Howell arrived in Columbia, he called off the search. "This is the place for me," said Howell, vice president of the African American Coalition of Howard County. "This is the type of place we were fighting and marching for."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
The momentous events that culminated in the March on Washington 50 years ago this week have largely overlooked the legacy of one man whose own dream of such a march was more than two decades in the making. Asa Philip Randolph — better known as A. Philip Randolph — went from being described as "the most dangerous Negro in America" for his work organizing the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters to being recognized as the grandfather of civil rights. "No other living American has done more to seek justice for all the poor, the working classes, the minorities in our society and around the world than has A. Philip Randolph," said civil rights leader Bayard Rustin, who was a protege of Randolph's and did much of the planning for the 1963 March on Washington.
NEWS
By Kenneth Lavon Johnson | August 27, 2013
In the spring of 1963, when I was a student at the U.S. Army's Judge Advocate General Corps School in Charlottesville, Va., the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. came to town to speak to the student body of the University of Virginia. At the time, my brother, Henry Floyd Johnson, was studying at UVA while also serving as the pastor of a church in Charlottesville. He had known King for some time, and took me to meet him on the evening that he was scheduled to speak. King greeted me warmly, and we chatted for about 15 minutes.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2013
Half a century ago this Wednesday, as a bright sun climbed the sky above downtown Washington, Douglas B. Sands, then 29, stood a few hundred feet from the Lincoln Memorial and looked out over the National Mall in wonder. It was 8:30 in the morning on Aug. 28, 1963. The long-awaited March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom would not begin for 21/2 hours. People were flooding in by the thousands, gathering by the Reflecting Pool like members of an extended family assembling for a picnic.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2013
Kenneth Collins knew he had a big day in store when he showed up for work Aug. 28, 1963. As an officer with the Metropolitan Police Department in Washington, his job was to protect the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., who planned a major speech to anchor the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Collins was prepared for violence. "Be on your toes," his sergeant had warned him. But he wasn't prepared to be so moved by King's "I Have a Dream" speech, to be motivated to take a deeper look at race relations in the nation's capital and in his own police force, which had already been integrated.
NEWS
August 22, 2013
Thousands of people are expected to descend on Washington this weekend to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington civil rights event. Several events are planned for the weekend and on Wednesday, Aug. 28, the anniversary of the day of the march. Baltimore-area civil rights groups are scrambling to keep up with the demand for bus reservations. Tessa Hill-Aston, president of the Baltimore chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, said that "the phones are jumping off the hook" with requests for transportation to Washington.
NEWS
May 20, 2013
A committee building a new memorial in Annapolis has extended the deadline for names of those who took part in the August 1963 March on Washington, where the Rev. Martin Luther King gave his famous "I Have a Dream" speech. The committee had initially set a deadline of May 19, but has extended it to May 31. The memorial is scheduled to be unveiled in Whitmore Park in Annapolis, where a bus departed for the march, on Aug. 28 - the 50 t h anniversary of the march. It is being paid for by donations to the committee.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | August 31, 1993
Washington. -- Saturday we saw in this nation's capital a pitiably feeble re-enactment of the great civil-rights March on Washington of 1963. That was the occasion on which Martin Luther King Jr. articulated his dream of a new, great America of racial and social justice.The 30th-anniversary ''march'' was for old-timers an embarrassment. So it probably was an honest commentary about what this country has done to King's dream.When that historic protest march occurred 30 years ago, black children were being battered and bloodied simply for trying to buy a hamburger or drink a cola in Jim Crow restaurants or fancy Southern department stores.
NEWS
August 27, 1993
The 30th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington by a coalition of civil rights groups will be marked with another march Saturday. It is unlikely that it will be the catalyst the original was. No one expects the 200,000-plus marchers of 1963. One reason for this is that despite the real problems related to race that remain on the nation's agenda, much of Martin Luther King Jr.'s immortal dream has come true.Dr. King was one of several speakers at the Lincoln Memorial in 1963. He concluded his plea for racial justice and harmony by declaring that he dreamed of the children of former slaves and former slave owners sitting together in brotherhood in the South, of his own children not being judged by the color of their skin, and so on.In law, and to a lesser degree in fact, the nation has become color-blind in the past 30 years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 19, 2011
John R. Burleigh 2d., a civil rights activist who had been chairman of the employment committee of the Congress of Racial Equality and retired from the city housing authority, died July 9 of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Hunting Ridge resident was 86. The son of a foundryman and a homemaker, Mr. Burleigh was born in Baltimore and raised in Dorsey. He was a 1943 graduate of Wiley H. Bates High School in Annapolis, and attended Howard University in Washington.
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