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Marcello Mastroianni

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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 20, 1996
Marcello Mastroianni, 72, the witty, affable and darkly handsome Italian actor who sprang on international consciousness in Federico Fellini's 1960 classic "La Dolce Vita," died Thursday at his Paris home.Mr. Mastroianni, a comic but also suave and romantic leading man in about 120 motion pictures, had suffered from pancreatic cancer.Actress Catherine Deneuve, their daughter, Chiara, and his other daughter, Barbara, were with him at his death.Mr. Mastroianni was much loved around the world for his roles opposite Italian actress Sophia Loren in 11 movies.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 20, 1996
Marcello Mastroianni, 72, the witty, affable and darkly handsome Italian actor who sprang on international consciousness in Federico Fellini's 1960 classic "La Dolce Vita," died Thursday at his Paris home.Mr. Mastroianni, a comic but also suave and romantic leading man in about 120 motion pictures, had suffered from pancreatic cancer.Actress Catherine Deneuve, their daughter, Chiara, and his other daughter, Barbara, were with him at his death.Mr. Mastroianni was much loved around the world for his roles opposite Italian actress Sophia Loren in 11 movies.
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FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 18, 1995
Fairy tales from sources other than the Disney Factory are rare enough these days, but can there be any rarer bird than a fairy tale from Argentina?Yet that's exactly what creeps into the Charles today in rotation with New Line's tragically disrespected "Hoop Dreams." The movie is called "I Don't Want To Talk About It," and it's one of those movies that feels sweetly magical.The scene is an unknown sea-coast town in Argentina in the '20s and '30s. Everyone in the place realizes exactly what the wealthy widow Leonor does not: that her beloved daughter Charlotte will not get any bigger.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 18, 1995
Fairy tales from sources other than the Disney Factory are rare enough these days, but can there be any rarer bird than a fairy tale from Argentina?Yet that's exactly what creeps into the Charles today in rotation with New Line's tragically disrespected "Hoop Dreams." The movie is called "I Don't Want To Talk About It," and it's one of those movies that feels sweetly magical.The scene is an unknown sea-coast town in Argentina in the '20s and '30s. Everyone in the place realizes exactly what the wealthy widow Leonor does not: that her beloved daughter Charlotte will not get any bigger.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | December 6, 1991
"La Vita" is still "Dolce" all these years later but it somewhat lacks the spice it once had.In 1960, Fellini's "La Dolce Vita" ("The Sweet Life") was such a scandal that my friend Lanahan and I sneaked down to the North Side of Chicago and lied about our ages in order to find out what all the fuss was about. Lanahan was studying for the priesthood but he was willing to risk eternal damnation for a shot at Anita Ekberg's cleavage. My soul was not at stake; I had already sold it in order to become a movie critic.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | August 22, 1991
None of the sobs that shook the Charles Theatre last year during the record-breaking run of "Cinema Paradiso" were mine. I thought that tear-jerker of a movie, with its clumsily told and over-long narrative, was filled with every cliche of Italian filmmaking.I dislike Giuseppe Tornatore's "Everybody's Fine," which opens today at the Charles, even more than his "Cinema Paradiso," and this time I think I'll have some company.Matteo Scuro (the great Marcello Mastroianni in a role that makes him look absurd behind fishbowl-thick eyeglasses)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 3, 1997
Was there a more cosmopolitan face than Marcello Mastroianni's? Wicked, knowing, suave, sophisticated, unflappable, unshockable, wise and good in restaurants, the man who owned it spent decades as the world's leading debauchee, an image chiseled indelibly for him in Fellini's "La Dolce Vita."Of course, the great Italian actor died two weeks ago after a long and fruitful career, and here is his last film, almost as an envoi. Would it play America were it not? Hmmm. Let's not contemplate that question too rigorously.
NEWS
March 24, 1994
* Bishop Alvaro del Portillo, 80, leader of the controversial and conservative Roman Catholic organization Opus Dei, died of a heart attack yesterday in Rome. The bishop, a Spaniard, had been Opus Dei's leader since the death of the organization's founder, Monsignor Josemaria Escriva de Balaguer, in 1975. Opus Dei (God's Work) has 77,000 lay members worldwide who receive spiritual guidance from the movement's 1,500 priests. The organization has for decades fended off criticism from liberal Catholics who accuse it of being secretive and elitist and of trying to create a church within the church.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 22, 1993
Horrible old aunts sometimes pinch the cheeks of children to make them rosy for photographers. I thought of that in "Used People," not because it's full of horrible old aunts -- although it is -- but because each character seems to have had his or hercheeks pinched by the director.Everybody has been brought to the fullest red-cheeked bloom of "character" and behaves with madcap zaniness throughout. There's not a moment of stillness or repose: It's all squawk and blather or tinpot tragedies playing out in badly decorated living rooms.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | August 22, 1991
Giuseppe Tornatore's ''Everybody's Fine'' is an interesting excursion about a father trying to re-connect with his children. Though Tornatore, who wrote and directed the film, takes his time making his point, the film has a gripping finish. It is hard to leave the theater feeling bad about "Everybody's Fine."Tornatore is the man who gave us the Academy Award-winning ''Cinema Paradiso.'' In this, his third feature film, Marcello Mastroianni plays a 74-year-old retired Sicilian named Matteo who decides to visit his five children.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | December 6, 1991
"La Vita" is still "Dolce" all these years later but it somewhat lacks the spice it once had.In 1960, Fellini's "La Dolce Vita" ("The Sweet Life") was such a scandal that my friend Lanahan and I sneaked down to the North Side of Chicago and lied about our ages in order to find out what all the fuss was about. Lanahan was studying for the priesthood but he was willing to risk eternal damnation for a shot at Anita Ekberg's cleavage. My soul was not at stake; I had already sold it in order to become a movie critic.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | August 22, 1991
None of the sobs that shook the Charles Theatre last year during the record-breaking run of "Cinema Paradiso" were mine. I thought that tear-jerker of a movie, with its clumsily told and over-long narrative, was filled with every cliche of Italian filmmaking.I dislike Giuseppe Tornatore's "Everybody's Fine," which opens today at the Charles, even more than his "Cinema Paradiso," and this time I think I'll have some company.Matteo Scuro (the great Marcello Mastroianni in a role that makes him look absurd behind fishbowl-thick eyeglasses)
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 4, 1999
Since its initial release 36 years ago, Federico Fellini's "8 1/2" has become such a filmmaker's talisman, quoted in almost every student film and Woody Allen movie you can think of, that it's difficult to take it on its own terms -- as a great film, no more, no less.Happily, the task has been made easier by the recent re-release of the film on a gloriously restored 35 millimeter black and white print, which arrives at the Charles Theatre today. And a fresh look at the movie many considered Fellini's masterpiece reveals a work that is as funny, glamorous, ingenious and morally relevant as it was the first day it was screened.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 26, 2000
The excruciating "La Grande Bouffe," Marco Ferreri's 1973 movie about four men who engage in a weekend of gluttony, sex and self-destruction, will be at The Charles tonight and will be shown at matinees over the weekend. Marcello Mastroianni, Phillipe Noiret, Ugo Tognazzi and Michel Piccoli star; even with that cast, viewers are advised to see it on an empty stomach. The Charles will also play "Kadosh," Amos Gitai's film that The Sun's Chris Kaltenbach called "a beautifully crafted, wonderfully acted meditation on the seeming incompatibility of Orthodox Judaism and modern sexual mores," in matinees tomorrow, Sunday and Monday.
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