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By ROB KASPER and ROB KASPER,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | October 22, 2008
She was an immigrant, uncertain of her English, marooned all day in a New York apartment while her husband was at work. So, by paging through an old Italian cookbook and by tapping an "intuitive understanding" of Italian food, she taught herself to cook. That is how Marcella Hazan, 84, describes the beginnings of her highly successful career as the cookbook author who became known as the queen of Italian cooking in America. When I read this account in Amarcord, Hazan's recently published memoir, I was taken aback.
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By ROB KASPER and ROB KASPER,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | October 22, 2008
She was an immigrant, uncertain of her English, marooned all day in a New York apartment while her husband was at work. So, by paging through an old Italian cookbook and by tapping an "intuitive understanding" of Italian food, she taught herself to cook. That is how Marcella Hazan, 84, describes the beginnings of her highly successful career as the cookbook author who became known as the queen of Italian cooking in America. When I read this account in Amarcord, Hazan's recently published memoir, I was taken aback.
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By William Rice and William Rice,Chicago Tribune | January 3, 1993
A chance meeting: Marcella Hazan, with her husband, Victor, is in Chicago as part of a promotional tour for her new book, "Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking" (Knopf, $30). Minutes later their countryman Angelo Gaja, the legendary wine producer, comes on the scene. The three are old friends. Victor Hazan has written a book on Italian wines. They embrace and decide to commemorate the reunion with a photograph.The two handsome men and the smiling Marcella strike a pose not unlike the famous photograph of Jeanne Moreau and her co-stars from the classic film "Jules et Jim."
NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,SUN COLUMNIST | November 17, 2004
Marcella Hazan, the queen of Italian cooking in America, is nearing the end of her reign. But before she leaves the throne, she has a few more messages to deliver: Don't shy away from salt, don't overdose on herbs and, above all else, remember that when you are cooking, your job is to coax the maximum flavor out of each ingredient. Be warned: This may sound simple, but it is not necessarily easy. There is, Marcella says, a rigor to good cooking. Details matter. She is old-school, a wise old head who believes in stressing fundamentals, perfecting techniques, scoffing at the froufrou.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,SUN COLUMNIST | November 17, 2004
Marcella Hazan, the queen of Italian cooking in America, is nearing the end of her reign. But before she leaves the throne, she has a few more messages to deliver: Don't shy away from salt, don't overdose on herbs and, above all else, remember that when you are cooking, your job is to coax the maximum flavor out of each ingredient. Be warned: This may sound simple, but it is not necessarily easy. There is, Marcella says, a rigor to good cooking. Details matter. She is old-school, a wise old head who believes in stressing fundamentals, perfecting techniques, scoffing at the froufrou.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1997
Listen up, Yanks. You're still not getting it. Some 24 years after noted cooking teacher and cookbook author Marcella Hazan sat down to explain the essentials of Italian cooking, you are still over-saucing the pasta and over-using ingredients meant be flavor notes. And, by the way, you are now under-cooking the spaghetti.Americans have learned a lot about Italian cuisine in the past two dozen years, Hazan said recently after a luncheon at the Willard Hotel in Washington, where she was battling both a cold and a grueling 16-city tour promoting her new book.
FEATURES
By Sam Gugino and Sam Gugino,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 14, 1991
Carmel, Calif. Marcella Hazan, slumped in a chair in the lobby of the famed Highlands Inn, is tired.And with good reason. After a fitful night ("The wind kept me up"), she gave an hourlong cooking demonstration, oversaw lunch preparation and tried to be cheery for a long line of admirers who wanted one of her three books autographed.And it's only 4 p.m.Niki Singer, Ms. Hazan's publicist, tries to explain that cooking artichoke risotto for 100 people at lunch would make anyone tired."Not 100, 130!"
NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,Newsday | May 23, 2007
I have a problem with crab cakes. I have been using the recipe on the back of the Old Bay Seasoning container, and the cakes always fall apart. I've tried more/less eggs, more/less bread, more/less crab, etc. Crab cakes present all sorts of frying problems because of their moist constitution and irregular surface. I am ever mindful of the sage advice of my cooking idol, Marcella Hazan: "Wet things won't brown." To that, I add: "Wet things won't allow the formation of a sturdy enough crust to keep the thing from falling apart."
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | August 4, 1993
Q: Garlic and shallots have a bit of green in the middle. Should this be used?A: The small bit of green in the middle is the beginning of a shoot. This will not have the flavor intensity of the more mature bulb, but certainly is edible.Q: How do you determine when pasta is cooked to al dente?A: According to Marcella Hazan, author of "The Essentials of Italian Cooking," pasta is cooked when it just stops snapping as you bite it. Al dente is an Italian phrase meaning "to the tooth." Pasta should be cooked until it is tender, but still firm.
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS | May 24, 2006
This week, I'm posing a question to myself: what do i think of victoria gotti's new cookbook, hot Italian dish? This has got to be one of the worst cookbooks to be published in years. We get a litany of Italian-American chestnuts, which, we must surmise, were inspired by a recent trip to "the Motherland." But Gotti's observations about Italian food range from prosaic to just plain wrong. During her trip she takes an "unforgettable" cooking lesson from Anna, an Italian home cook who teaches her how to make linguine with white clam sauce.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1997
Listen up, Yanks. You're still not getting it. Some 24 years after noted cooking teacher and cookbook author Marcella Hazan sat down to explain the essentials of Italian cooking, you are still over-saucing the pasta and over-using ingredients meant be flavor notes. And, by the way, you are now under-cooking the spaghetti.Americans have learned a lot about Italian cuisine in the past two dozen years, Hazan said recently after a luncheon at the Willard Hotel in Washington, where she was battling both a cold and a grueling 16-city tour promoting her new book.
FEATURES
By William Rice and William Rice,Chicago Tribune | January 3, 1993
A chance meeting: Marcella Hazan, with her husband, Victor, is in Chicago as part of a promotional tour for her new book, "Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking" (Knopf, $30). Minutes later their countryman Angelo Gaja, the legendary wine producer, comes on the scene. The three are old friends. Victor Hazan has written a book on Italian wines. They embrace and decide to commemorate the reunion with a photograph.The two handsome men and the smiling Marcella strike a pose not unlike the famous photograph of Jeanne Moreau and her co-stars from the classic film "Jules et Jim."
FEATURES
By Sam Gugino and Sam Gugino,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 14, 1991
Carmel, Calif. Marcella Hazan, slumped in a chair in the lobby of the famed Highlands Inn, is tired.And with good reason. After a fitful night ("The wind kept me up"), she gave an hourlong cooking demonstration, oversaw lunch preparation and tried to be cheery for a long line of admirers who wanted one of her three books autographed.And it's only 4 p.m.Niki Singer, Ms. Hazan's publicist, tries to explain that cooking artichoke risotto for 100 people at lunch would make anyone tired."Not 100, 130!"
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN REPORTER | March 22, 2006
Ciao Italia Pronto! 30-Minute Recipes from an Italian Kitchen How to Cook Italian By Giuliano Hazan Scribner / 2005 / $35 In keeping with the family theme, Giuliano Hazan, son of Italian cookbook author Marcella Hazan, has created a cookbook for the accomplished Italian cook. This book reads like a cooking course: It begins with lessons on equipment and pantry supplies, then goes on to cooking technique and food preparation. (The lesson on trimming leeks was particularly helpful.)
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | October 21, 2009
As soon as the first snowflake falls in Garrett County, basil plants in Baltimore fold for the season. That is an exaggeration, but only a slight one. Basil is a weather wimp, the first plant to swoon when the temperatures dip near freezing, if only for a few hours. One day it is green, leafy and verdant and the next it is black, woody and kaput. Cue the leaf pickers. As soon as there is a slight chill in the air, they start plucking basil leaves from the plants, turning them into a variety of dishes but mainly pesto.
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