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By Claudia Luther and Claudia Luther,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 24, 2007
Marcel Marceau, the great French mime who for seven decades mastered silence and brought new life to an ancient art form, has died. He was 84. Mr. Marceau died Saturday in Paris, French news media reported, citing his former assistant, Emmanuel Vacca. The cause of death was not disclosed. Yesterday, French Prime Minister Francois Fillon praised Mr. Marceau as "the master," saying he had the rare gift of "being able to communicate with each and everyone beyond the barriers of language." Active until late in his life, Mr. Marceau toured the world for more than half a century, giving more than 15,000 performances.
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By Claudia Luther and Claudia Luther,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 24, 2007
Marcel Marceau, the great French mime who for seven decades mastered silence and brought new life to an ancient art form, has died. He was 84. Mr. Marceau died Saturday in Paris, French news media reported, citing his former assistant, Emmanuel Vacca. The cause of death was not disclosed. Yesterday, French Prime Minister Francois Fillon praised Mr. Marceau as "the master," saying he had the rare gift of "being able to communicate with each and everyone beyond the barriers of language." Active until late in his life, Mr. Marceau toured the world for more than half a century, giving more than 15,000 performances.
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By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF WRITER | January 30, 2000
Marcel Marceau seems melancholy. But his is a melancholy suffused with resilience. The man who is considered the greatest mime in the world (try to name another!) has a lot on his mind, and though the weight of his thoughts wearies him, he isn't daunted. For more than five decades, Marceau has been practicing his art in Europe, America, Asia, Africa, Australia. He has performed in movies and before presidents and diplomats, written children's books and been featured endlessly in newspapers and on television.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | December 2, 2002
AS REQUIRED by law, over the Thanksgiving holiday I watched a lot of NFL football, the only league where a Mardi Gras seemed to break out on every play. Is it me, or is all the celebrating officially getting out of hand now? Apparently, there is no accomplishment so insignificant that pro football players won't celebrate it anymore. They celebrate sacks. They celebrate interceptions. They celebrate a 2-yard run up the middle by some fat fullback. If they pick up a first down, they celebrate by flexing their muscles Hulk Hogan-style, as if no one in league history had ever picked up a first down before.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2000
The jazz acts, artists, dancers, singers and performers roving around Columbia for the past 11 days have packed up and left town -- at least until next year. This year's Columbia Festival of the Arts closed yesterday with two power-packed performances by mime Marcel Marceau, and an afternoon recital by pianist Michael Sheppard, a student at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore. Organizers breathed a sigh of relief and accomplishment after the final performance. Some organizers estimated that more than 30,000 people attended the indoor and outdoor festivities since the festival opened June 15. The event also featured performances by singer Andrea Marcovicci, Les Deux Mondes, ice-dance troupe The Next Ice Age, the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company, the Eva Anderson Dancers, The Washington Ballet, violinist Mark O'Connor, fiddler Natalie MacMaster, and singer Emmylou Harris.
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By D.J. Foster and D.J. Foster,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 26, 2000
The Columbia Festival of the Arts has become one of the premiere showcases for dance in the Baltimore metropolitan area. Since its modest beginnings in 1988, when the festival's featured companies were Kinetics Dance Theatre of Ellicott City and the Garth Fagan Dance Company, dance has become an integral player in the 10-day event. The 2000 festival, which wrapped up yesterday, included performances by such renowned international artists as Marcel Marceau, companies as groundbreaking as `The Next Ice Age" and an announcement of a company in residence for future festivals - the well-respected Washington Ballet.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | June 18, 1993
The problem with writing a column is that you get a lot of mail, much of it scrawled in crayon, which you are nonetheless expected to answer.As a matter of personal preference, I like letters such as this:"Dear Sir,"You are a very funny writer, and the only reason I buy the local fishwrap. That column you wrote about all TV repairmen being crooks was a hoot! If you're ever in Monroe, N.Y., give me a call and Erma and I will treat you to a fine dinner at the Goose Pond Inn."Your No. 1 fan,Earl T. Longworthy Jr."
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | December 2, 2002
AS REQUIRED by law, over the Thanksgiving holiday I watched a lot of NFL football, the only league where a Mardi Gras seemed to break out on every play. Is it me, or is all the celebrating officially getting out of hand now? Apparently, there is no accomplishment so insignificant that pro football players won't celebrate it anymore. They celebrate sacks. They celebrate interceptions. They celebrate a 2-yard run up the middle by some fat fullback. If they pick up a first down, they celebrate by flexing their muscles Hulk Hogan-style, as if no one in league history had ever picked up a first down before.
FEATURES
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2000
The man who has spent his life helping America remember believes that the country has succumbed to "national Alzheimer's" disease. All information, little knowledge. And scant wisdom. "We don't remember anything. There's no yesterday in this country, and I want to re-create those yesterdays," says Studs Terkel, the dean of oral historians whose adventures with a tape recorder have secured the life lessons of hobos, soldiers and losers for all time. "The free market is God now, but we forgot what happened in the 1930s -- that people were crying for the government to save their asses and that the people who condemn government [regulation]
FEATURES
By Brian McTavish and Brian McTavish,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 3, 2003
Love it or loathe it - or just go with it - the television laugh track remains a staple after five decades of viewer-assisted frivolity. For that triumph or disgrace, one person can be thanked or blamed. Charlie Douglass, who died in April at age 93, was a technical director of TV shows in the 1950s. He noticed that studio audiences didn't laugh as much when jokes were repeated after the first take. So the mechanical and electrical engineer, who helped develop a shipboard radar for the Navy in World War II, created a "laff box" that would supply recorded audience reaction.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2000
The jazz acts, artists, dancers, singers and performers roving around Columbia for the past 11 days have packed up and left town -- at least until next year. This year's Columbia Festival of the Arts closed yesterday with two power-packed performances by mime Marcel Marceau, and an afternoon recital by pianist Michael Sheppard, a student at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore. Organizers breathed a sigh of relief and accomplishment after the final performance. Some organizers estimated that more than 30,000 people attended the indoor and outdoor festivities since the festival opened June 15. The event also featured performances by singer Andrea Marcovicci, Les Deux Mondes, ice-dance troupe The Next Ice Age, the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company, the Eva Anderson Dancers, The Washington Ballet, violinist Mark O'Connor, fiddler Natalie MacMaster, and singer Emmylou Harris.
FEATURES
By D.J. Foster and D.J. Foster,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 26, 2000
The Columbia Festival of the Arts has become one of the premiere showcases for dance in the Baltimore metropolitan area. Since its modest beginnings in 1988, when the festival's featured companies were Kinetics Dance Theatre of Ellicott City and the Garth Fagan Dance Company, dance has become an integral player in the 10-day event. The 2000 festival, which wrapped up yesterday, included performances by such renowned international artists as Marcel Marceau, companies as groundbreaking as `The Next Ice Age" and an announcement of a company in residence for future festivals - the well-respected Washington Ballet.
FEATURES
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2000
The man who has spent his life helping America remember believes that the country has succumbed to "national Alzheimer's" disease. All information, little knowledge. And scant wisdom. "We don't remember anything. There's no yesterday in this country, and I want to re-create those yesterdays," says Studs Terkel, the dean of oral historians whose adventures with a tape recorder have secured the life lessons of hobos, soldiers and losers for all time. "The free market is God now, but we forgot what happened in the 1930s -- that people were crying for the government to save their asses and that the people who condemn government [regulation]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF WRITER | January 30, 2000
Marcel Marceau seems melancholy. But his is a melancholy suffused with resilience. The man who is considered the greatest mime in the world (try to name another!) has a lot on his mind, and though the weight of his thoughts wearies him, he isn't daunted. For more than five decades, Marceau has been practicing his art in Europe, America, Asia, Africa, Australia. He has performed in movies and before presidents and diplomats, written children's books and been featured endlessly in newspapers and on television.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | June 18, 1993
The problem with writing a column is that you get a lot of mail, much of it scrawled in crayon, which you are nonetheless expected to answer.As a matter of personal preference, I like letters such as this:"Dear Sir,"You are a very funny writer, and the only reason I buy the local fishwrap. That column you wrote about all TV repairmen being crooks was a hoot! If you're ever in Monroe, N.Y., give me a call and Erma and I will treat you to a fine dinner at the Goose Pond Inn."Your No. 1 fan,Earl T. Longworthy Jr."
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2001
Everyone agrees that the Columbia Festival of the Arts has changed. Once a local, grass-roots effort, the festival has steadily grown since it began in 1988. High-profile acts have helped lure larger crowds, securing the festival's place as one of the region's most-anticipated summer events. With this year's festival, organizers are working to bring in more international acts in hopes of drawing more visitors from around the country. But the ambitious plans have met with criticism from some who believe that the festival has abandoned those groups that helped it grow: local arts organizations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Morris | March 20, 2003
Parodying politics and more "Clinton and Bush Rock 'n Roll Party," "Larry King Live in Highlandtown" and "Springtime for Ehrlich" are just a few of the comedic sketches you'll see at Creative Alliance's "Loyal Opposition" show at 8 p.m. tomorrow. "Loyal Opposition" aims to combine political humor, impressions, satire, improv and music. Four-time Emmy Award-winning comic Bob Heck impersonates Bill Clinton, Larry King, Regis Philbin and Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. The show takes place at Creative Alliance, 413 S. Conkling St. Tickets are $10; $8 for Creative Alliance members.
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