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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2012
Is Marc Steiner smarter than Denise Koch? Can the president of Baltimore's City Council outwit the president of a local college? Are any of them brainier than your average sixth grader? Baltimore will find out Saturday when local celebrities play "Are You Smarter Than a Sixth Grader?" for a good cause -- raising money for the Sisters Academy of Baltimore, a tuition-free Catholic middle school for girls from low-income neighborhoods. It will be just like the television show, except the personalities will compete with real sixth graders in teams.
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
Marc Steiner will move his show to 9 a.m. weekdays starting May 13 on WEAA-FM, the veteran Baltimore talkshow host said Friday. "We're moving to 9 a.m. as part of a new news and information format," Steiner wrote in an email.  "It's very exciting and will allow for some interesting changes, development and growth for our show. "  Steiner's show had been airing on the Morgan State station from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Steiner's show will run from 9 to 11 a.m. weekdays.
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By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1995
Marc Steiner has his game face on.It is 30 seconds to air time, and the WJHU talk-show host, usually lively and animated, is so still he appears to be meditating. He may not get as nervous as he did when he started the show 2 1/2 years ago, but today's is a tough one, a telephone discussion with Dinesh D'Souza. Mr. D'Souza's latest book, "The End of Racism," which argues that white racism is not the real problem facing black Americans, is perfect for a call-in radio show, controversial and current.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2012
Is Marc Steiner smarter than Denise Koch? Can the president of Baltimore's City Council outwit the president of a local college? Are any of them brainier than your average sixth grader? Baltimore will find out Saturday when local celebrities play "Are You Smarter Than a Sixth Grader?" for a good cause -- raising money for the Sisters Academy of Baltimore, a tuition-free Catholic middle school for girls from low-income neighborhoods. It will be just like the television show, except the personalities will compete with real sixth graders in teams.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | August 21, 2001
The Johns Hopkins University will give a local group seeking to take control of WJHU (88.1 FM) a bit more time to arrange the sale's final terms, according to both parties. On July 13, Maryland Public Radio Corp., led by WJHU talk show host Marc Steiner, was granted a month by Hopkins to solidify its financing and to fine-tune other parts of the deal. No other bids would be considered by the university during that period. On Aug. 13, the not-for-profit group was given a week's extension.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | February 4, 2008
The February pastoral, all soft light and tired fields, stops abruptly at Marc Steiner's doorstep. Whatever sanctuary his home along an actual country lane in Sparks would ordinarily offer, he's missing it, as his phone rings and rings and rings. The longtime talk-show host, whose name to many was nearly synonymous with public radio station WYPR, is freshly fired. He paces the tight living room, taking calls from family members who want to make sure he's OK, from co-workers who point out the support piling up online, from friends and fans who just don't get it. He runs agitated fingers through thick graying hair and removes wire-framed glasses to rub away a trace of tears.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | April 30, 2001
As today's deadline for bids arrives, at least four groups are seeking control of WJHU (88.1 FM), the public radio station owned by the Johns Hopkins University. According to participants, the suitors include Maryland Public Television; WAMU (American University's public radio station); WBUR (Boston University's public radio station); and an independent group that includes WJHU talk show host Marc Steiner. Steiner's effort, called Maryland Public Radio, has raised more than $160,000 in pledges from WJHU listeners.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | June 7, 2001
The efforts of the Johns Hopkins University to sell its public radio station appear to have collapsed, as two of the three named finalists recently decided against bidding for the station. University officials had set next Monday as the day they would announce the new owner of WJHU-FM (88.1), Baltimore's sole National Public Radio news affiliate. But over the weekend, WAMU-FM, owned by American University in Washington, and WBUR, owned by Boston University, reversed themselves, declining to submit bids.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | February 3, 2009
A year has passed since the very public, and messy, divorce of Marc Steiner from the Baltimore public radio station that he had long represented. Although some predicted WYPR would suffer from Steiner's dismissal last Feb. 1, the station is just as strong a year later, with more listeners and solid donor support especially with the turbulent economy. For his part, Steiner is on the air at WEAA, Morgan State University's public radio station. Here's a look at four of the figures involved: Steiner; his former boss Anthony Brandon; his WYPR successor Baltimore Sun columnist Dan Rodricks; and peace activist Max Obuszewski, one of Steiner's staunchest supporters - one year later.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,Sun Staff | April 15, 2001
Marc Steiner enters the station laughing, ready to blow another leak in the public discourse: "We'll tackle the political rumor of the moment, the St. Paul's School fiasco, rioting at the University of Maryland, crime in the city ... " Day after day, WJHU's little 10,000-watt FM radio antenna broadcasts the most impassioned --sometimes, most informed -- claptrap and truth-telling in the city. Tom in Baltimore, Melvin in Woodlawn, Pat in Essex, Victoria in Cockeysville join dozens of callers jamming phone lines while Steiner stirs up a tornado talking about fecal coliform in local streams, recycling snafus, troubles with the crab harvest and some of the day's other most perceptible threats to civilization from Baltimore to Catonsville.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2010
Frances Kay Dellinger, an activist in third-party political groups, ended her life June 11 at her Northeast Baltimore home. She was 66. Friends said she had been treated for intestinal disease and depression for 18 months before her death. Born in Washington, she earned a sociology degree from the University of Maryland, College Park. A political activist, she organized a tenants union at an apartment house in suburban Washington and had worked for the Moratorium to End the War in Vietnam in the late 1960s.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | February 3, 2009
A year has passed since the very public, and messy, divorce of Marc Steiner from the Baltimore public radio station that he had long represented. Although some predicted WYPR would suffer from Steiner's dismissal last Feb. 1, the station is just as strong a year later, with more listeners and solid donor support especially with the turbulent economy. For his part, Steiner is on the air at WEAA, Morgan State University's public radio station. Here's a look at four of the figures involved: Steiner; his former boss Anthony Brandon; his WYPR successor Baltimore Sun columnist Dan Rodricks; and peace activist Max Obuszewski, one of Steiner's staunchest supporters - one year later.
NEWS
August 31, 2008
Slots the wrong way to balance a budget Like everyone else, I am struggling to deal with the current economy. As a military reservist and a government employee with a wife, kid and bills to pay, I sit at the kitchen table trying to make my budget numbers work. But one solution I do not consider is playing the lottery or slots. That would be irresponsible. And that is no less true for the state of Maryland ("Slots opponents drafting suit over ballot wording," Aug. 26). When my budget numbers get tight, I have to cut back.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | June 6, 2008
Talk-show host Marc Steiner, whose forced exit from WYPR-FM set off a firestorm of protest and left his fans calling for the removal of station management, will resurface next week with a weekly morning show on WEAA-FM. The new hourlong Marc Steiner Show will air at 9 a.m. Wednesdays on WEAA (88.9), which broadcasts from the campus of Morgan State University. Plans call for the show to air daily beginning in the fall, possibly as early as September, Steiner said. "We're very excited," said the radio host, whose show will be produced by his own Center for Emerging Media.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Reporter | April 16, 2008
The board of directors of WYPR yesterday said its removal of talk-show host Marc Steiner from the Baltimore public radio station in February "will not be undone," in spite of a room full of protesters and a recommendation that it do so from its hand-picked community advisory board. "The decision cannot and will not be reversed," WYPR board chairwoman Barbara Bozzuto told a packed meeting room at the Church of the Redeemer in Baltimore. Steiner, the station's longtime public affairs host, was lauded for his "secure place in the history of WYPR," Bozzuto said.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | April 3, 2008
Two months after WYPR fired him, Marc Steiner won a Peabody Award yesterday - just as the public radio station kicked off a fund drive that it had postponed in the wake of the intense outcry that followed the host's dismissal. The Peabody recognized Steiner's 2007 series titled Just Words, a documentary that featured the voices of addicts, ex-felons and the homeless. Steiner, who nominated his work for the prize, called it "an amazing honor." "The idea was that nobody heard the words and stories of the working poor of America and what they have to say about their own lives," Steiner said.
NEWS
February 3, 2008
Legg Mason picks new chief After a lengthy search, Mark R. Fetting, head of Legg Mason's mutual fund division, was named to succeed company patriarch Raymond A. "Chip" Mason. Guard's killer avoids death An inmate convicted of killing a Western Maryland corrections officer was sentenced to life in prison without parole instead of the death penalty. President has empathy with addicts George W. Bush spoke bluntly of his battles with substance abuse during a visit to a Baltimore job-placement program supported by federal faith-based funding.
NEWS
February 6, 2008
Steiner's voice goes silent on public radio I was both surprised and appalled by WYPR's decision to fire Marc Steiner ("Public radio station cancels Steiner show," Feb. 2). Mr. Steiner has been the heart of WYPR for many years, and his program is one of the best of its kind in the nation. As a regular listener to, and an occasional guest on, his program, I have been deeply impressed by the dedication and preparation Mr. Steiner brings to each of his shows. While my politics are to the right of Mr. Steiner's, I have noted that he has been scrupulous about keeping his panels balanced.
NEWS
By Mark Newgent | February 22, 2008
WYPR's firing of Marc Steiner generated much gnashing of teeth and bemoaning of the state of public radio. I don't have an opinion on Marc Steiner one way or the other; I don't listen to WYPR because its progressive tilt does not appeal to me. However, in nearly all press and opinion accounts, the comparisons of Mr. Steiner's show with conservative talk radio were vapid at best, and at worst a slur upon conservative talk-radio listeners. Baltimore Examiner columnist Michael Olesker described Mr. Steiner's show as a format where "smart, informed people shared the news and the cultural trends of the day. ... It wasn't a chorus line of ditto-heads echoing each other's cheap shots; it was a true marketplace exchange of ideas."
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