Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMarc Singer
IN THE NEWS

Marc Singer

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joe Mathews | February 6, 2000
On an unseasonably cool, late summer morning in Los Angeles, Marc Singer drives a rented green Ford Mustang convertible onto the Warner Bros. lot. He is nervous enough to have taken the extraordinary step of wearing a collared dress shirt over his usual T-shirt. In the three months since Marc launched episodes of the interactive Bozlo Beaver on the Internet, his company, togglethis, has been deluged with calls and offers from ad agencies that want to use interactive characters. But Hollywood has been slower to notice.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 16, 2000
"We're homeless people down here," says Henry, who's cooking dinner on a portable stove operating inside a New York City train tunnel, "but we know how to cook." That "but" is at the center of "Dark Days," a remarkable documentary now playing at the Charles Theatre. Director Marc Singer's film never condescends as it follows about two dozen subterranean dwellers. It never treats them as less than people whose homes just happen to stand alongside underground railroad tracks. Yes, they are living in circumstances that would make most people's skin crawl.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 16, 2000
"We're homeless people down here," says Henry, who's cooking dinner on a portable stove operating inside a New York City train tunnel, "but we know how to cook." That "but" is at the center of "Dark Days," a remarkable documentary now playing at the Charles Theatre. Director Marc Singer's film never condescends as it follows about two dozen subterranean dwellers. It never treats them as less than people whose homes just happen to stand alongside underground railroad tracks. Yes, they are living in circumstances that would make most people's skin crawl.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joe Mathews | February 6, 2000
On an unseasonably cool, late summer morning in Los Angeles, Marc Singer drives a rented green Ford Mustang convertible onto the Warner Bros. lot. He is nervous enough to have taken the extraordinary step of wearing a collared dress shirt over his usual T-shirt. In the three months since Marc launched episodes of the interactive Bozlo Beaver on the Internet, his company, togglethis, has been deluged with calls and offers from ad agencies that want to use interactive characters. But Hollywood has been slower to notice.
FEATURES
By JOE MATHEWS and JOE MATHEWS,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2000
When Marc Singer wakes up each morning at his messy apartment on 12th Street, he eyes a host of inanimate objects: a TV, a couch, clothes (on the floor), a month's worth of old newspapers, boxes of Eudora e-mail. "All these things are potential interactive characters," he thinks -- potential tools for revolutionizing the Internet and ushering in the next great form of human entertainment. Why not? People yell at their golf balls. They give names to their cars. They routinely treat fictional characters, natural phenomena and inanimate objects as if they were alive.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2000
In 1991, Baltimore-born Marc Singer graduated from college in the midst of a recession, knowing little of computers or e-mail and unable to find a job. By 1999, at age 30, he was running togglethis -- a struggling Internet company whose unique interactive technology threatened to shake up the online world -- if it managed to survive. Marc's story -- told in nine episodes beginning next Sunday in Arts & Society (and online at www.Sunspot.net) -- is a look inside the real world of the virtual world: from starving entrepreneurs with big ideas to the corporate "suits" who offer them big dollars, from a Bill-Gates-hating programmer named Raj to a feisty interactive cartoon beaver named Bozlo.
NEWS
May 4, 2006
On Tuesday, May 2, 2006, BARBARA REA ROTHBLOOM (nee Braunstein); beloved wife of the late Sheldon Beerman and Norman Rothbloom; devoted mother of Steven Jay Beerman, Lisa and Marc Singer, all of Baltimore; devoted sister of Stewart and Jan Braunstein, Sharon and Joel Marchanti, all of Baltimore and the late Herbert Braunstein; loving grandmother of Eric and Scott Singer. Funeral services and interment will be held at the Oheb Shalom Memorial Park, Berrymans Lane on Wednesday May 3 at 2 P.M. Please omit flowers.
NEWS
March 2, 2005
On Sunday, February 27, 2005, JAY ALLAN MEYERS; beloved husband of Laurie Meyers (nee Levin); devoted father of Jeremy Alexander, Phillip Benjamin and Sara Nicole Meyers; loving brother of Jody Singer; devoted brother-in-law of Dr. Marc Singer; loving son of Martin and Bernice Meyers; loving son-in-law of Joan Levin and the late Harvey Levin. Services will be held at SOL LEVINSON and BROS., INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt. Wilson Lane on Wednesday, March 2 at 12 noon. Interment B'nai Israel, 3701 Southern Avenue.
NEWS
May 24, 2005
On May 22, 2005 GOLDIE SINGER (nee Eisman); beloved wife of Lester Singer; beloved mother of Michael David Singer of Baltimore, MD and L. Terri Singer of Tampa, FL; devoted sister of Rosalind Pearlman, Lillian Fried, both of Baltimore, MD, Perry Eisman of Florida and the late David Eisman; loving grandmother of Marc Aaron Singer. Also survived by many nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS HOME, 8900 Reisterstown Rd, at Mt, Wilson Lane, on Tuesday, May 24 at 10 A.M. Interment Anshe Emunah Aitz Chaim Congregation Cemetery, 3901 Washington Blvd.
NEWS
March 30, 2006
On March 28, 2006, LESTER I. SINGER; beloved husband of the late Goldie Singer (nee Eisman); beloved father of Michael David Singer of Baltimore, MD and L. Terri Singer of Lutz, FL; devoted brother of the late Rosalind Wilson; devoted brother in law of Rosalind Pearlman, Lillian Fried and William P. Eisman; loving grandfather of Marc Aaron Singer. Also survived by many nieces, nephews and cousins. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS, INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt. Wilson Lane on Thursday, March 30, at 10 A.M. Interment Anshe Emunah Aitz Chaim Congregation Cemetery, 3901 Washington Blvd.
FEATURES
By JOE MATHEWS and JOE MATHEWS,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2000
When Marc Singer wakes up each morning at his messy apartment on 12th Street, he eyes a host of inanimate objects: a TV, a couch, clothes (on the floor), a month's worth of old newspapers, boxes of Eudora e-mail. "All these things are potential interactive characters," he thinks -- potential tools for revolutionizing the Internet and ushering in the next great form of human entertainment. Why not? People yell at their golf balls. They give names to their cars. They routinely treat fictional characters, natural phenomena and inanimate objects as if they were alive.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | July 10, 1991
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* OK, admit it, this one is probably irresistible: Premiering on basic cable's Nashville Network tonight (at 8, with a repeat at 11) is "Dinah Shore: A Special Conversation With Burt Reynolds."Even most non-readers of the supermarket tabloids will recall that early television's "see the U.S.A. . . ." singer Shore and original hunk Reynolds (now married to actress Loni Anderson) had a much celebrated private relationship -- and subsequent split -- some years back.* Speaking of durable TV figures, Roddy McDowall's almost-camp presence is the only thing that makes the latest world premiere movie on the USA cable network moderately watchable.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,STAFF WRITER | December 25, 1995
Had enough of Christmas with the family? Then TV's the place to be. You can spend the holiday with a guy who's got a thing for animals, an outer space creature whose finger lights up, Buzz Lightyear, a "boy" and his horse, Good old Charlie Brown or even Mama Partridge. Choose away.* "Very Merry Christmas Parade" (10 a.m.-noon, WMAR, Channel 2) -- Spend Christmas morning with Mickey and the gang, as Joan Lunden and Regis Philbin introduce the country to Christmas at Disney World. I have a feeling a few of the guys from "Toy Story" will show up as well.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.