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By Holly Hanson and Holly Hanson,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | February 26, 1992
DALLAS -- This wouldn't seem to be the best time to be a fashion designer, what with retail outlets folding, designer labels dying and customers staying away from stores in droves.But Marc Jacobs doesn't see it that way."The recession has made it more fun for me," said Mr. Jacobs, 28, who has been the women's wear designer for the Perry Ellis label for more than three years."I can't see doing anything that requires spending money unless it's a pleasant, fun experience," he said. "If I spend money, it has to be on something I love.
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By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
Anne Keane, Fashion Director at Lucky magazine, took a few moments to dish with us about the top trends she saw at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week. Q: What are the biggest trends you saw on the runways? A: So far I love the playful stripes at Marc Jacobs and Michael Kors. It's a little bit '60s with a fresh spin. Q: How do you recreate these trends at home? A: Pay attention to shapes and accessories. A boxy bag and sharp pointy flats were fun compliments to Marc Jacobs' striped looks.
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By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
Anne Keane, Fashion Director at Lucky magazine, took a few moments to dish with us about the top trends she saw at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week. Q: What are the biggest trends you saw on the runways? A: So far I love the playful stripes at Marc Jacobs and Michael Kors. It's a little bit '60s with a fresh spin. Q: How do you recreate these trends at home? A: Pay attention to shapes and accessories. A boxy bag and sharp pointy flats were fun compliments to Marc Jacobs' striped looks.
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By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2010
Jane Randall , Monkton native and Roland Park Country School graduate, just missed out on the finals of "America's Next Top Model" when she was eliminated last week, but she vows to pursue a modeling career even if it delays the completion of her degree from Princeton University. The 5-foot-9 head-turner with killer bone structure left the competition during a close double-elimination. Before her exit, she was showered with compliments and words of encouragement from show's head judge and creator, Tyra Banks.
FEATURES
By Teresa Gubbins and Teresa Gubbins,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | July 3, 2001
Words, words, words. They're turning up on everything from shirts to bags to shoes to skin. It's graffiti without the walls. Think "I AM SO PRETTY" scrawled across the bodice of a Christian Dior creation. Or "LOUIS VUITTON PARIS" spelled out in thickly painted letters on a $700 Vuitton bag. Or the doodles that cover a pair of Marc by Marc Jacobs jeans. This is writing by hand: scrawled on an impulse, infused with the outlaw spirit of a graffiti artist. It is a gesture of bold expressionism.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Johnston and Cheryl Johnston,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2003
Cheaters never prosper, the old adage goes. But Winona Ryder, Stephen Glass and Jayson Blair might beg to differ. All three can tell you that sometimes crime pays. After appearing in court dressed in fashion label Marc Jacobs' clothes to face charges of shoplifting a Marc Jacobs top, among other items, Ryder has now modeled for the designer. Stephen Glass, a former writer for The New Republic, Rolling Stone, Harper's and George magazines, was discovered in 1998 to be fabricating his articles.
FEATURES
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN REPORTER | February 13, 2006
New York -- Fashion Week came to a close last week just as a snowstorm approached to blanket the city. The chilly weather was a fitting end to the eight-day extravaganza of top designers' picks for fall and next winter, which showed us how to go out and brave the cold in style. Here are some of the looks for next season: Coats and wraps From the beautifully embroidered coats at Bill Blass, to the fur-drenched wraps at Zang Toi, to the artfully loose and unstructured numbers at Marc Jacobs, women will have myriad choices as to how to cover up. "You just felt this sense of warmth and coziness and luxury with all the coats," says Dannielle Romano, editor-at-large of DailyCandy.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR | January 26, 1997
The dream dressFormal-wear manufacturers are anticipating a demand for this summer's ultimate wedding gown, a knockoff of last year's ultimate wedding gown. The Carolyn Bessette-Kennedy dress, which was front page in virtually every periodical in September, has caught the fancy of brides-to-be."Our version is certainly inspired, but not a copy," says Peter Noviello, who along with Sherrie Bloom designs the Chetta B label. "The bias asymmetrical cut with the trumpet hem puts the look across," he says of the devore velvet dress.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2000
NEW YORK - As if it weren't bad enough that the '80s began making a comeback this fall, the news from Fashion Week is that designers seem determined to keep that dastardly decade around for a while. Marc Jacobs - one of more than 100 designers who unveiled spring collections this week - was all but ordering a revival of '80s non-chic. The models wore jersey T-shirt dresses with thick belts and fat, colorful bows in their hair like Madonna used to do. Anna Sui trotted out models in purple, yellow, electric blue and hot pink dresses and skirts with big rips in them.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | November 10, 1994
MARC JACOBSWith his reborn business still too modest for the fashion week tents in New York's Bryant Park, Marc Jacobs got a day's head start showing in a photo loft in Soho.It was a select audience, with the top fashion players in attendance. A showroom setting with limited seating is a more accurate barometer of fashion clout. What they saw was a first glimpse of the retro fever that raged through many spring collections. Marc Jacobs hopped decades and drew inspiration from clothing as diverse as Dale Evans cowgirl frocks and Busby Berkeley tap pants.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2010
The fashion magazines have a considerable amount of heft to them this month. The children are off to school, and the fashionistas are flocking north to New York City for Fashion Week. The fall fashion season is officially here. Local fashion insiders have put their wish lists together for the hottest items this autumn. We asked them to share their must-have items this season. Here are their responses: Justin Head, designer for j.Robert, based in Upper Marlboro "Make sure you have a pair of dark-colored-frame sunglasses.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun reporter | September 9, 2007
Under the glare of bright lights, camera flashes and critical eyes, big-named designers such as Carolina Herrera, Oscar de la Renta and Anna Sui will unveil their spring collections tomorrow - the sixth day of New York's Fashion Week. But the frenetic day of runway shows will end where many of the industry's most savvy say contemporary fashion begins: At the Marc Jacobs show. No matter what his freshly envisioned clothes actually look like - glamorous or grunge, romantic or retro - the 44-year-old designer Jacobs will unveil a fashion vision tomorrow night that is almost certain to define the direction for spring and set trends for future seasons.
FEATURES
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN REPORTER | February 13, 2006
New York -- Fashion Week came to a close last week just as a snowstorm approached to blanket the city. The chilly weather was a fitting end to the eight-day extravaganza of top designers' picks for fall and next winter, which showed us how to go out and brave the cold in style. Here are some of the looks for next season: Coats and wraps From the beautifully embroidered coats at Bill Blass, to the fur-drenched wraps at Zang Toi, to the artfully loose and unstructured numbers at Marc Jacobs, women will have myriad choices as to how to cover up. "You just felt this sense of warmth and coziness and luxury with all the coats," says Dannielle Romano, editor-at-large of DailyCandy.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2004
NEW YORK - If fall fashion is a refined woman, all prim, ladylike and tweedy, then spring is her ebullient younger sister - innocent, girly and fun. As Fashion Week came to a close yesterday, a fanciful mood for spring was forecast - with floaty, candy-colored dresses, sweet cuffed shorts, romantic prints and soft, luxurious fabrics. The designers, displaying their work under a light and airy tent in Manhattan's Bryant Park, gave women permission to be paradoxes when shopping for clothes this spring.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Johnston and Cheryl Johnston,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2003
Cheaters never prosper, the old adage goes. But Winona Ryder, Stephen Glass and Jayson Blair might beg to differ. All three can tell you that sometimes crime pays. After appearing in court dressed in fashion label Marc Jacobs' clothes to face charges of shoplifting a Marc Jacobs top, among other items, Ryder has now modeled for the designer. Stephen Glass, a former writer for The New Republic, Rolling Stone, Harper's and George magazines, was discovered in 1998 to be fabricating his articles.
FEATURES
By Teresa Gubbins and Teresa Gubbins,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | July 3, 2001
Words, words, words. They're turning up on everything from shirts to bags to shoes to skin. It's graffiti without the walls. Think "I AM SO PRETTY" scrawled across the bodice of a Christian Dior creation. Or "LOUIS VUITTON PARIS" spelled out in thickly painted letters on a $700 Vuitton bag. Or the doodles that cover a pair of Marc by Marc Jacobs jeans. This is writing by hand: scrawled on an impulse, infused with the outlaw spirit of a graffiti artist. It is a gesture of bold expressionism.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2010
Jane Randall , Monkton native and Roland Park Country School graduate, just missed out on the finals of "America's Next Top Model" when she was eliminated last week, but she vows to pursue a modeling career even if it delays the completion of her degree from Princeton University. The 5-foot-9 head-turner with killer bone structure left the competition during a close double-elimination. Before her exit, she was showered with compliments and words of encouragement from show's head judge and creator, Tyra Banks.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2010
The fashion magazines have a considerable amount of heft to them this month. The children are off to school, and the fashionistas are flocking north to New York City for Fashion Week. The fall fashion season is officially here. Local fashion insiders have put their wish lists together for the hottest items this autumn. We asked them to share their must-have items this season. Here are their responses: Justin Head, designer for j.Robert, based in Upper Marlboro "Make sure you have a pair of dark-colored-frame sunglasses.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2000
NEW YORK - As if it weren't bad enough that the '80s began making a comeback this fall, the news from Fashion Week is that designers seem determined to keep that dastardly decade around for a while. Marc Jacobs - one of more than 100 designers who unveiled spring collections this week - was all but ordering a revival of '80s non-chic. The models wore jersey T-shirt dresses with thick belts and fat, colorful bows in their hair like Madonna used to do. Anna Sui trotted out models in purple, yellow, electric blue and hot pink dresses and skirts with big rips in them.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR | January 26, 1997
The dream dressFormal-wear manufacturers are anticipating a demand for this summer's ultimate wedding gown, a knockoff of last year's ultimate wedding gown. The Carolyn Bessette-Kennedy dress, which was front page in virtually every periodical in September, has caught the fancy of brides-to-be."Our version is certainly inspired, but not a copy," says Peter Noviello, who along with Sherrie Bloom designs the Chetta B label. "The bias asymmetrical cut with the trumpet hem puts the look across," he says of the devore velvet dress.
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