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By Heather Lloyd and Heather Lloyd,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2001
All the children of Marble Hill need do to find heroes to look up to is walk to the southwest corner of Laurens Street and Druid Hill Avenue. There, about 30 feet above their heads, tower some of the community's luminaries. Six of the West Baltimore neighborhood's most prominent one-time residents - including Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall and Afro-American newspaper founder John H. Murphy - have been immortalized in a recently completed mural at 1740 Druid Hill Ave. Mural designer Jason Dohanish, 22, said the work is meant to bring the images - and possibly the spirits - of the figures home.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
The committee tasked with filing a vacant City Council seat listened to more than four hours of testimony Tuesday evening from 14 candidates with a wide range of experiences. But when it came time to debate their relative merits, there was little discussion. The committee voted on only one candidate - Eric T. Costello, 33, the president of the Federal Hill Neighborhood Association - and approved him by an 11-2 vote, after considering the matter for less than five minutes. "I'm humbled and honored at the opportunity," said Costello, an information technology auditor in the U.S. Government Accountability Office.
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NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1997
Twenty years ago, Marion McGaskey Blackwell was a pioneer, moving into a depressed area of West Baltimore that many people were fleeing for the suburbs.Attracted by low prices for large, historic houses, Blackwell and a number of other young, black professionals planned to make their neighborhood, Marble Hill, as trendy as nearby Bolton Hill, Federal Hill and Union Square. But that dream hasn't been realized."We never got that critical mass of homeowners that's needed to make a significant change," said Blackwell, 53.Now, in another effort to attract homeowners, the Marble Hill Community Association is offering a Black History Month Tour from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. tomorrow and March 1, beginning at the community association's offices at 418 Mosher St.On both days, visitors will receive a list of 25 homes for sale by private owners -- mostly long-vacant buildings that are generally architecturally sound, Blackwell said.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2003
In a gesture aimed at softening the hardships of living amid airport noise and traffic, state officials awarded grants yesterday to three communities near Baltimore-Washington International Airport to improve sidewalks, trim trees and paint speed bumps. The grants, which total about $225,500, are the largest given since the state created the community enhancement program two years ago. The program, which grew from a bill sponsored by Democratic state Sen. James E. DeGrange Sr., authorizes the state to contribute $1 for each takeoff and landing into a fund for transportation-related improvements within the airport's noise zone.
NEWS
By ANTERO PIETILA | November 7, 1992
For a decade and a half, efforts to rescue the old Orchard Street Methodist Church were a seemingly never-ending saga of false starts and frustrations. But when the Baltimore Urban League decided to acquire the badly vandalized landmark for its new headquarters, it injected enough credibility and clout to get things moving.Now that the $3.7 million restoration has been completed, it is heartening to report that the result is nothing short of spectacular.''I think we are going to be an anchor for the whole Druid Hill Avenue corridor,'' says Urban League president Roger I. Lyons.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2003
In a gesture aimed at softening the hardships of living amid airport noise and traffic, state officials awarded grants yesterday to three communities near Baltimore-Washington International Airport to improve sidewalks, trim trees and paint speed bumps. The grants, which total about $225,500, are the largest given since the state created the community enhancement program two years ago. The program, which grew from a bill sponsored by Democratic state Sen. James E. DeGrange Sr., authorizes the state to contribute $1 for each takeoff and landing into a fund for transportation-related improvements within the airport's noise zone.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Evening Sun Staff | October 4, 1990
When Baltimore Heritage's latest series of walking tours gets under way this weekend, those who attend are in for an important lesson: Architectural excellence is not the only concern of historic preservationists.The series of five tours, to be conducted on weekends through Nov. 4, begins Sunday with "Formstone: Friend or Faux," one of the two new additions to the walking tours lineup."Our goal is to mix tours about architecture with tours about neighborhoods," says coordinator Dean Krimmel, of the non-profit group that advocates cultural and architectural preservation in the city.
NEWS
March 29, 1996
Clarence E. Clemens, 79, educator, historianClarence E. Clemens, a retired Baltimore County educator who wrote a history of the northern part of the county, died Tuesday of cancer at Charlestown Care Center in Catonsville. He was 79.He retired in 1978 as head of the guidance and counseling department at Hereford High School, ending a career in education that began in 1947.Known as Clem, he was a resident of Corbett, a small community south of Monkton.In 1976, he published "From Marble Hill to Maryland Line: A History of Northern Baltimore County."
NEWS
By From staff reports | August 6, 1998
WOODLAWN -- Nearly 4,200 people were evacuated from two Social Security Administration buildings yesterday after a suspicious package was discovered in the mail.The evacuation lasted from about 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. while a hazardous material unit was called to the scene and removed the package. Authorities found that the package, a footlocker sent through the mail, contained motorcycle parts and an unknown but nonhazardous liquid.The package was traced to an address in Houston, Texas, said Postal Inspector Doug Bim, who called the incident a hoax.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
The committee tasked with filing a vacant City Council seat listened to more than four hours of testimony Tuesday evening from 14 candidates with a wide range of experiences. But when it came time to debate their relative merits, there was little discussion. The committee voted on only one candidate - Eric T. Costello, 33, the president of the Federal Hill Neighborhood Association - and approved him by an 11-2 vote, after considering the matter for less than five minutes. "I'm humbled and honored at the opportunity," said Costello, an information technology auditor in the U.S. Government Accountability Office.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2001
More than 200 residents of the Bolton Hill and Marble Hill neighborhoods gave a list of demands yesterday to representatives of two grocery chains vying to replace the vacant Super Fresh store on McMechen Street, including specialty sections for patrons and a living wage paid to employees. Teams from the 900-store, St. Louis-based Save-A-Lot grocery chain and the small Baltimore chain of Stop Shop & Save addressed questions from the public at a meeting organized by BUILD (Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development)
NEWS
By Heather Lloyd and Heather Lloyd,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2001
All the children of Marble Hill need do to find heroes to look up to is walk to the southwest corner of Laurens Street and Druid Hill Avenue. There, about 30 feet above their heads, tower some of the community's luminaries. Six of the West Baltimore neighborhood's most prominent one-time residents - including Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall and Afro-American newspaper founder John H. Murphy - have been immortalized in a recently completed mural at 1740 Druid Hill Ave. Mural designer Jason Dohanish, 22, said the work is meant to bring the images - and possibly the spirits - of the figures home.
NEWS
By From staff reports | August 6, 1998
WOODLAWN -- Nearly 4,200 people were evacuated from two Social Security Administration buildings yesterday after a suspicious package was discovered in the mail.The evacuation lasted from about 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. while a hazardous material unit was called to the scene and removed the package. Authorities found that the package, a footlocker sent through the mail, contained motorcycle parts and an unknown but nonhazardous liquid.The package was traced to an address in Houston, Texas, said Postal Inspector Doug Bim, who called the incident a hoax.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1997
Twenty years ago, Marion McGaskey Blackwell was a pioneer, moving into a depressed area of West Baltimore that many people were fleeing for the suburbs.Attracted by low prices for large, historic houses, Blackwell and a number of other young, black professionals planned to make their neighborhood, Marble Hill, as trendy as nearby Bolton Hill, Federal Hill and Union Square. But that dream hasn't been realized."We never got that critical mass of homeowners that's needed to make a significant change," said Blackwell, 53.Now, in another effort to attract homeowners, the Marble Hill Community Association is offering a Black History Month Tour from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. tomorrow and March 1, beginning at the community association's offices at 418 Mosher St.On both days, visitors will receive a list of 25 homes for sale by private owners -- mostly long-vacant buildings that are generally architecturally sound, Blackwell said.
NEWS
March 29, 1996
Clarence E. Clemens, 79, educator, historianClarence E. Clemens, a retired Baltimore County educator who wrote a history of the northern part of the county, died Tuesday of cancer at Charlestown Care Center in Catonsville. He was 79.He retired in 1978 as head of the guidance and counseling department at Hereford High School, ending a career in education that began in 1947.Known as Clem, he was a resident of Corbett, a small community south of Monkton.In 1976, he published "From Marble Hill to Maryland Line: A History of Northern Baltimore County."
NEWS
By ANTERO PIETILA | November 7, 1992
For a decade and a half, efforts to rescue the old Orchard Street Methodist Church were a seemingly never-ending saga of false starts and frustrations. But when the Baltimore Urban League decided to acquire the badly vandalized landmark for its new headquarters, it injected enough credibility and clout to get things moving.Now that the $3.7 million restoration has been completed, it is heartening to report that the result is nothing short of spectacular.''I think we are going to be an anchor for the whole Druid Hill Avenue corridor,'' says Urban League president Roger I. Lyons.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2001
More than 200 residents of the Bolton Hill and Marble Hill neighborhoods gave a list of demands yesterday to representatives of two grocery chains vying to replace the vacant Super Fresh store on McMechen Street, including specialty sections for patrons and a living wage paid to employees. Teams from the 900-store, St. Louis-based Save-A-Lot grocery chain and the small Baltimore chain of Stop Shop & Save addressed questions from the public at a meeting organized by BUILD (Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development)
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2011
A 23-year-old male was shot in the torso in the area of Cold Spring Lane and Marble Hill Road around 7:50 p.m. Friday, according to Baltimore City Police. As of Saturday morning, the victim was in stable condition and expected to recover. There is no information about suspects or a motive in the shooting and the investigation is continuing, a police spokesman said.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Evening Sun Staff | October 4, 1990
When Baltimore Heritage's latest series of walking tours gets under way this weekend, those who attend are in for an important lesson: Architectural excellence is not the only concern of historic preservationists.The series of five tours, to be conducted on weekends through Nov. 4, begins Sunday with "Formstone: Friend or Faux," one of the two new additions to the walking tours lineup."Our goal is to mix tours about architecture with tours about neighborhoods," says coordinator Dean Krimmel, of the non-profit group that advocates cultural and architectural preservation in the city.
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