Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMarble Bar
IN THE NEWS

Marble Bar

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2011
The Marble Bar at the Congress Hotel was quietly re-listed again last week. The bar/club, which once hosted the likes of R.E.M. and Iggy Pop, went up for lease in December at an undisclosed price. But it seems no offers materialized. Congress Financial, which bought the hotel last year, retired the bar from the market several months ago, said Henry Deford, the JBL Real estate agent handling the property. The company listed it for lease because, with all 36 units at the once iconic hotel filled, it also wants to revive the bar, Deford said last year.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2013
Seven weeks in, The Chesapeake is still finding its sea legs. There is potential here. The servers are capable and friendly, and there's evidence of talent in the kitchen, but the new restaurant near Station North has yet to assemble a coherent message. It's exasperating. What are they waiting for? The owners of The Chesapeake have talked about wanting it to be approachable. They've achieved that, at least with the physical space, which is roomy, comfortable and blandly attractive.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
The historic Congress Hotel on Baltimore's west side, built in 1905 as one of the grande dames of city hotels and converted to housing nearly a decade ago, sold at a foreclosure auction Tuesday for $2.35 million. The renovated 36-unit apartment building was bought back by its lender, Congress Financial LLC. That entity is made up of "investors with significant local ties," said Y. Jeffrey Spatz, an attorney representing the winning bidder at the auction outside the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
The original Chesapeake Restaurant was a Baltimore dining institution for more than 50 years until it closed in the late 1980s. After a 24-year dormancy, the doors at 1701 North Charles St. are open again. The new restaurant began dinner service on Monday. We figured you'd have some questions, so we went to see The Chesapeake for ourselves. It's too early to give it a full review, but here's what things look like so far.  Is it the old Chesapeake Restaurant? It is not. But it's not trying to be. The old Chesapeake was for destination dining.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2001
Renovation is in full swing at the Congress Hotel, where Struever Brothers, Eccles & Rouse Inc. has invested $7.2 million in restoring the down-on-its-heels dowager of a hotel that looms large over the 300 block of West Franklin St. Conversion of the eight-story landmark hotel, built in 1903 in Second Empire style, into 12 one-bedroom and 24 two-bedroom apartments is being hailed as one of the first projects to be completed in the city's much ballyhooed west-side...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2013
Seven weeks in, The Chesapeake is still finding its sea legs. There is potential here. The servers are capable and friendly, and there's evidence of talent in the kitchen, but the new restaurant near Station North has yet to assemble a coherent message. It's exasperating. What are they waiting for? The owners of The Chesapeake have talked about wanting it to be approachable. They've achieved that, at least with the physical space, which is roomy, comfortable and blandly attractive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
The original Chesapeake Restaurant was a Baltimore dining institution for more than 50 years until it closed in the late 1980s. After a 24-year dormancy, the doors at 1701 North Charles St. are open again. The new restaurant began dinner service on Monday. We figured you'd have some questions, so we went to see The Chesapeake for ourselves. It's too early to give it a full review, but here's what things look like so far.  Is it the old Chesapeake Restaurant? It is not. But it's not trying to be. The old Chesapeake was for destination dining.
BUSINESS
By Ed Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2010
A landmark apartment building on Baltimore's West Side, the 36-unit Congress Hotel, is going on the auction block. The foreclosure auction will be at 2:30 p.m. on Sept. 28 at the Clarence M. Mitchell Court House, according to the website for Alex Cooper Auctioneers, which is handling the sale. The eight-story building, constructed in 1903 and once known as the Kernan Hotel, was renovated to contain 12 one-bedroom and 24 two-bedroom apartments nearly 10 years ago by Kernan Apartments LLC, an affiliate of Struever Bros.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2000
The city Board of Estimates yesterday approved a 20-year city tax break to developers renovating downtown's Congress Hotel. In addition to being exempt from paying $38,500 in city property taxes over 20 years, Struever Brothers, Eccles & Rouse Inc. will receive a $1.5 million state loan, as well as federal and state historic-preservation tax credits, to renovate the 97-year-old hotel at 306 W. Franklin St. Struever Brothers will invest $7.2 million to...
NEWS
December 7, 1995
Charles Village plan called a fiascoYour Nov. 28 editorial discussing the proposed "Midtown benefits district" says, in part, "too bad the Midtown vote is occurring before the Charles Village district can be properly assessed."While it's true that there has been no formal evaluation of the experimental benefits district in Charles Village yet, several facts may shed light on its dismal record so far.According to its own financial reports, the Charles Village district is spending about $22,600 per month on security.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2011
The Marble Bar at the Congress Hotel was quietly re-listed again last week. The bar/club, which once hosted the likes of R.E.M. and Iggy Pop, went up for lease in December at an undisclosed price. But it seems no offers materialized. Congress Financial, which bought the hotel last year, retired the bar from the market several months ago, said Henry Deford, the JBL Real estate agent handling the property. The company listed it for lease because, with all 36 units at the once iconic hotel filled, it also wants to revive the bar, Deford said last year.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
The historic Congress Hotel on Baltimore's west side, built in 1905 as one of the grande dames of city hotels and converted to housing nearly a decade ago, sold at a foreclosure auction Tuesday for $2.35 million. The renovated 36-unit apartment building was bought back by its lender, Congress Financial LLC. That entity is made up of "investors with significant local ties," said Y. Jeffrey Spatz, an attorney representing the winning bidder at the auction outside the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2001
Renovation is in full swing at the Congress Hotel, where Struever Brothers, Eccles & Rouse Inc. has invested $7.2 million in restoring the down-on-its-heels dowager of a hotel that looms large over the 300 block of West Franklin St. Conversion of the eight-story landmark hotel, built in 1903 in Second Empire style, into 12 one-bedroom and 24 two-bedroom apartments is being hailed as one of the first projects to be completed in the city's much ballyhooed west-side...
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1999
BALTIMORE'S historic Congress Hotel would be reborn as a 36-unit apartment residence called The Kernan, under the latest plan to bring housing to the west side of downtown Baltimore.Owner J. Thomas Dowling recently joined forces with a co-developer, Struever Bros., Eccles & Rouse, and they are working to begin construction on the $5 million project by June.Plans call for the building's upper six floors to be converted to market-rate apartments and for the lower levels, including the hotel ballroom, mezzanine and Marble Bar, to be leased to commercial or office tenants.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1995
HENRY FONDA and Margaret Sullavan were married in its ballroom. Sarah Bernhardt, Charlie Chaplin and Will Rogers were among the hundreds of celebrities who reportedly stayed in guest rooms upstairs.Soon, a new generation of artists and performers may be able to visit or even live in the historic Kernan Hotel, as a result of Baltimore's efforts to transform the Howard Street corridor into an Avenue of the Arts.The vacant building at 306 W. Franklin St., last known as the Congress Hotel, is in line to be converted to a 42-unit apartment building, with lower-level restaurants and other public spaces.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.