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By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2012
Sebastian Martorana is a stoop storyteller in the finest tradition of Baltimore's stoop storytellers. The sculptor, a transplant to the city who recognized immediately the cultural meaning of rowhouse marble steps, tells the story of trying to rescue many of those steps from demolition. "These steps are a savable part of Baltimore history," said Martorana, whose work has been chosen for display in the prestigious "40 under 40: Craft Futures" at the Renwick Gallery at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington that opened Friday.
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By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
Alice Johnson noticed the checker boards that recently popped up behind her house, a neat brick rowhouse in the Barclay neighborhood of Baltimore. "People will definitely use them," she said. "I play. I wish I could play chess, too. " She should have time to learn. The boards have been etched permanently into 1,000-pound slabs of marble in a new community courtyard. The stones are salvaged steps from several area houses, and the artist who placed them in the courtyard hopes they become a new kind of Baltimore front steps - where urban dwellers have long gathered, told stories and played games.
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By Will Morton, For The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2013
White marble has stood as a Baltimore icon for decades, primarily as rowhouse steps, the preferred gathering place for residents in many neighborhoods. The marble also served as the street-level façade for a number of downtown buildings, greeting thousands of Baltimoreans on their daily rush to work. But amid decades of renovation and redevelopment, cheaper replacements relegated countless tons of once-gleaming stone to the dump. That's where Stuart B. Foard found inspiration for a heavyweight home project.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
Byron G. "Geoff" Tosi Jr. the semiretired president and CEO of Albre Marble Restoration Specialists Inc., died May 23 of complications from emphysema at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 70. The son of Byron G. Tosi, a wine and spirits importer, and Palmyna Albre Tosi, a patron of the arts, Byron Geoffrey Tosi was born in Boston and raised in that city's Chestnut Hill neighborhood. After graduating in 1962 from Avon Old Farms School in Avon, Conn., he earned a bachelor's degree in 1966 in business administration from Boston College, where he played ice hockey and was commissioned a lieutenant in the ROTC program.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1998
As elaborate scaffolding envelops the Washington Monument in the nation's capital for a $9.4 million restoration, pallets of snowy-white Cockeysville marble await delivery to the site. Just as early builders sought the impressive rock from central Baltimore County to construct the towering monument to George Washington in the mid-1800s, today's contractors wanted similar stone to patch the monument's aging, weather-worn exterior. "There was an obvious benefit to using marble from the same quarry," said Vikki Keys, a deputy superintendent with the National Park Service, which oversees the 555-foot-high obelisk.
NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2000
In the beige marble shower at the vice president's home in Washington, the floor is slotted so Al Gore doesn't slip while he's lathering up. In Whitney Houston's New Jersey residence, peach granite counters -- including one atop an island shaped like a baby-grand piano -- highlight the kitchen. And in a conference room on the 28th floor of Rockefeller Center in New York rests a 6-ton, $51,000 granite table so long that to talk to someone at the other end one would have to send e-mail.
NEWS
By Susannah Rosenblatt and Susannah Rosenblatt,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 9, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Tomb of the Unknowns, the memorial that honors unidentified American servicemen and servicewomen killed in battle and attracts millions of visitors annually, is being replaced after 72 years. The white marble monument atop a hill in Arlington National Cemetery is cracked on all four sides. The fault runs diagonally 1 1/2 times around the rectangular tomb, cutting through its classic facade, slicing the three laurel wreaths etched on two sides and marring the Greek relief figures of Peace, Victory and Valor carved into one end. The crack doesn't obscure the solemn inscription: "Here Rests In Honored Glory An American Soldier Known But To God."
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 13, 2005
A key to Jon Isherwood's alluring, large-scale abstract stone sculptures at C. Grimaldis Gallery lies in the fascinating video installation set up in the rear gallery that suggests the sources of this British-born artist's inspiration. Isherwood makes emotive, vessel-like and architectural forms of striking freshness and technical polish. Some of the pieces resemble gourds or roughly hewn wine flasks, while others recall the swelling female forms of Stone Age sculpture. The pieces, carved from richly veined marbles in various colors, are scored on their surfaces with intricate swirling patterns and writhing curlicues that create a palpable impression of motion despite their heavy immobility.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | March 29, 1998
We want to remodel and divide a big, old-fashioned bathroom. One part is to be converted into a powder room for guests; the rest of the space will remain a bathroom adjoining a seldom-used spare bedroom. We want to give both spaces a bit of flair so that they don't look purely functional. Can you suggest alternatives to white fixtures, tile and counter tops, and pastel wallpaper?In aiming for "flair," you're probably also seeking to give that new powder room a touch of elegance. That will certainly preclude not only the lab-like look of all-white surfaces, but also any use of pastels.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | June 20, 2001
In ancient Athens, artists adorned buildings with sculptures of the human figure, called caryatids, that reflected the Greek ideal of beauty. In modern-day Baltimore, architects have collaborated with a Maryland sculptor to create four caryatids that reflect a different sort of ideal. The polished marble on the faces and hands is dark, in contrast to the light headdresses and robes. Two have broad noses and full lips that suggest an African-American heritage. The other two have features that seem European.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2014
The panache and entertaining lifestyle of 1920s Baltimore awaits the buyer who purchases the 88-year-old grand residence at 115 Woodholme Ave. in Baltimore County, currently offered at $889,000. "We've been calling it the '[Great] Gatsby' style of mansion," said listing agent Michael J. Schiff of Keller Williams Realty Baltimore. "It's very over the top; a true showhome for your guests. " Within its two-story, 7,100-square foot interior, the rooms are spacious and elegant. From the marble floor of the center hall foyer, the home's traditional layout boasts substantial rooms that include a formal, sunken living room, dining room, gourmet kitchen, a slate-floored sunroom, a family room with a wood-beam ceiling - and finally, a 19-foot by 45-foot ballroom with custom-painted hardwood floors and a ceiling painted in Victorian-style fashion.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
Homebuyers looking for a place to love might find their match in this property off Valentine Creek and Severn River in Anne Arundel County. The comtemporary home on Riverside Drive North has 1,910 square feet of open living space and a view of the water from every window. The four-bedroom home is listed for $837,900. "Relaxing on the deck overlooking Valentine Creek, with the sun setting or rising is truly a wonderfully serene experience," said Stefan Holtz, of the Creig Northrop Team of Long & Foster Real Estate, which listed the property.
FEATURES
By Will Morton, For The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2013
White marble has stood as a Baltimore icon for decades, primarily as rowhouse steps, the preferred gathering place for residents in many neighborhoods. The marble also served as the street-level façade for a number of downtown buildings, greeting thousands of Baltimoreans on their daily rush to work. But amid decades of renovation and redevelopment, cheaper replacements relegated countless tons of once-gleaming stone to the dump. That's where Stuart B. Foard found inspiration for a heavyweight home project.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
The first images of Earth as seen from space, appearing as a swirly blue marble, were groundbreaking. Now NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration have published photos of Earth by night using infrared imaging technology via satellite. The images show what is now a fairly familiar view of clusters of city lights, but what is different is it shows those twinkling lights from afar across the entire globe. You can see the darkened planet at various vantage points, as well as in an animated video, at NASA's Earth Observatory website . You can also view them in a gallery in the Sun's Darkroom photo blog . They were gathered through a partnership between NASA and NOAA.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2012
Sebastian Martorana is a stoop storyteller in the finest tradition of Baltimore's stoop storytellers. The sculptor, a transplant to the city who recognized immediately the cultural meaning of rowhouse marble steps, tells the story of trying to rescue many of those steps from demolition. "These steps are a savable part of Baltimore history," said Martorana, whose work has been chosen for display in the prestigious "40 under 40: Craft Futures" at the Renwick Gallery at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington that opened Friday.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
When the 50-year-old driver handed over his slingshot, he admitted to pelting the speed camera van with glass marbles. By the time Bruce L. May of Ellicott City was arrested and in Howard County police custody Tuesday night, police said, he had revealed he had taken it personally when he was issued two tickets in the past six weeks after being captured by speed cameras. The incident near a Howard County elementary school is just the latest in a spate of Baltimore-area vandalism against speed cameras.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Parijat Didolkar | March 22, 2001
Shoot 'em up Watch state, national and international marble-shooting champions demonstrate their expertise at the eighth annual Greater Baltimore-Washington Marble Show in Perry Hall Saturday. Watch or join in the American "ringer" and British marble games. Enter a Chinese checker tournament, get a free appraisal of your marble collection, attend an auction of marbles and marble-related items, and perhaps win one of the door prizes, including a jar of marbles. The show takes place Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Perry Hall Middle School, 4300 Ebenezer Road.
NEWS
March 22, 2000
Police Westminster: A resident of Long Valley Road told police Sunday that someone threw a marble through the front window of her home. Damage was estimated at $200. Fire Westminster: Firefighters responded at 5: 26 p.m. Monday to a fire alarm in the 500 block of Mark Drive. Units were out 21 minutes.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
Lady Baltimore has withstood much in 189 years perched overlooking Courthouse Square. She has lost both of her arms over the decades — one of them, holding high a wreath that signifies service to the republic, was sheared off by a gust of wind in January 1938, shattering on the pavement. And though it may be hard to tell from the street 52 feet below, wind, rain, snow, hail and pollution have dissolved much of the marble statue's eyes, nose and ears. But a new effort will finally give Lady Baltimore a new home — for her own good.
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
With some paint and glazes, a few tools and a little time, a plain, functional front door can become a home's welcoming statement, with the rich colors and grains of oak or mahogany. A concrete column can look like marble, a ceiling can become a cloud-dappled sky and old cabinets can get new life. To get those looks and more, all homeowners have to do is go to school. The Faux School, founded in Frederick by artist Ron Layman, 41, offers classes on decorative painting techniques to amateurs and professionals alike.
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