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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 15, 2012
The stories of marathon runners collapsing and dying at the finish line are enough to scare anybody thinking of participating in one of the 26.2 mile races popular around this time of year. But a new study by Johns Hopkins researchers has found the risk of deaths at marathon races is pretty low. Not impossible, but not all that likely either. A runner's risk of dying during or soon after the race is about .75 per 100,000 the research found. Men were twice as likely to die as women.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
The Baltimore Running Festival consistently generates about $40 million in economic impact each year, according to official estimates, and at its peak, the Grand Prix of Baltimore pumped $47 million into area hotels, restaurants and stores. Organizers of 2012's Star-Spangled Sailabration say that weeklong event poured even more money - about $166 million - into the local economy. But city officials say this week's Star-Spangled Spectacular - which marks 200 years since troops in Baltimore beat back a British invasion and the national anthem was written - could surpass all those totals.
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NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
Safari Charles of Owings Mills learned a few important lessons after running her first half-marathon last year. Wear shoes that fit, or your toenails may turn black. Run with a group for motivation (and for those days your husband would rather sleep in). Carry water on your long runs. This year as Charles prepares to run her first full marathon at the Baltimore Running Festival in October, she hopes to have learned from last year's experience. She has bigger shoes and trains with the group Black Girls Run, which she says gets her on the pavement consistently.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Charnie L. "Les" Kinion Jr., a city firefighter who founded the Baltimore Road Runners Club and the Maryland Marathon, died July 23 of a heart attack in Brooklyn, N.Y. He was 78. "The Maryland Marathon was Les' baby. He did a lot of the work and knew how to get races organized," said John Roemer, a friend for more than 40 years. "People liked him and he was the best face the Maryland Marathon ever had," said Mr. Roemer, who lives near Parkton. "It attracted some of the best runners in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
The final stage direction in Samuel Beckett's “Play” is “repeat.” The Acme Corporation, one of Baltimore's experimental theater companies, is taking that instruction very seriously. Last Friday, the one-act, three-character, roughly one-hour work was performed on a kind of continual loop from noon until midnight in a high-ceilinged, balconied hall at St. Mark's Lutheran Church. But that's just a warm-up. This week, the production's length will double, running continually from one noon to the next.
EXPLORE
June 17, 2013
For one student, it took learning to strategize to make it through. Another became noticeably more responsible in all aspects of life. Yet another learned that time management and goal-setting lead to success. Each of them, along with 24 of their peers, used these new skills to cross the finish line in this year's Marathon of Achievement. The Marathon of Achievement, or MOA, is a way for the students to excel outside of their regular studies. Created more than a decade ago by Southampton Team 7D teachers, the goal is to challenge students with academic, cultural and character building exercises that offer each of them a chance to be a winner.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | September 5, 1994
Three marathons, one telethon, and still it seems like nothingthon.* "Jerry Lewis Muscular Dystrophy Telethon" (continues 6 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Channel 2) -- Jerry Lewis, still at the helm of the TV fund-raising phenomenon he turned into an annual event and media institution, is planning to go the distance again, with help during this 29th annual telecast from Tony Bennett, Boyz II Men, Elayne Boosler, Larry King and others.* "Don't Tell Mom the Babysitter's Dead" (8-10 p.m., Channel 45) -- This 1991 telemovie, starring Christina Applegate of "Married . . . With Children," is echoed, in a way, in another Fox series, the family drama "Party of Five," which premieres a week from tonight.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 25, 2005
I'm running the Shamrock Marathon in Virginia Beach in mid-March. What do I need to pack? I'm worried that I'll forget something. Don't feel too frazzled. If you forget anything, most of what you'll need for the race can be bought there when you arrive. Here's what not to forget: your running shoes and socks, one comfortable running outfit and your race confirmation packet. If you have nothing else, make sure these are safely packed and ready to go, and if you fly, carry them on. As for the rest of your gear, here is our Top 10 list: 1. Warm-up suit.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Twice a year, in March and November, St. Leo the Great, a Roman Catholic parish in Little Italy, hosts a ravioli and spaghetti dinner fundraiser. And every year, volunteers gather at the parish's former school building to prepare tens of thousands of ravioli. Take a look at scenes from a past marathon ravioli-making, and meatball-making, session at St. Leo's. It's almost ravioli time at St. Leo's [Pictures]    
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham and The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
Boys' Latin is gearing up for round-the-clock lacrosse starting Thursday morning to raise money for wounded American soldiers through the Wounded Warrior Project. Shootout for Soldiers is a 24-hour lacrosse game set to take place from 9 a.m. Thursday through 9 a.m. Friday. The 24-hour game, for males 10 years old and up, will be divided into 24 one-hour sections. A number of professional and college players have signed up to play and support the benefit. Through lacrosse, the goal is to raise significant funds for wounded American soldiers as well as establish a stronger connection with local veterans.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
Drivers could hit some congestion in Anne Arundel County this weekend due to multiple events planned for the greater Annapolis area. The Maryland Transportation Authority is warning of heavy traffic at the Bay Bridge Friday through Sunday due to a NASCAR races at Dover International Speedway in Delaware. In the event of eastbound delays, officials will allow two-way traffic on the westbound span to alleviate delays, if weather permits. Also Friday through Sunday, BGE plans to continue utility work in Crownsville including the use of helicopters to replace wires and utility poles.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | May 11, 2014
Alex Paddison, 17, of Adamstown was the top finisher in the Maryland Half Marathon on Saturday with a time of 1 hour, 22 minutes, 14.2 seconds. Paddison, a junior at Tuscarora, is the youngest runner to win the race, which begins and ends in the Maple Lawn community of Howard County, south of Columbia. Monica Federoff, 25, of Bethesda was the first female runner across the finish line with a time of 1:34:27.3. Ashish Rathee, 38, of Ellicott City finished second overall in 1:26:08.6, followed by Tom Stock, 31, of Baltimore in 1:26:43.1.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | May 5, 2014
For 10 years Sandy Thomas had been running a 2-mile circuit most mornings around her North Laurel neighborhood of Hammond Village to stay physically fit, but in 2006 life handed her a detour. Her husband, Jim, died that year from skin cancer, and the ranch-style home where they had lived for nearly 40 years and raised five kids suddenly seemed too big. So she sold the house in 2007 to her son, Mark Thomas, and moved to Hanover, Pa. Sandy Thomas, who is fit and youthful at 71, continues to run in her new community.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
Manny Machado walked to the plate with a storybook return to major league action in mind. Machado, fresh from offseason knee surgery and in his first game of the season, led off the bottom of the ninth early Friday morning in a tied game. He ultimately popped up to short center field, capping an 0-for-5 performance at the plate that didn't put much shine on what was otherwise a good day for the Orioles. "Definitely. It crosses your mind a little bit, I'm not going to lie," said Machado, when asked whether he wanted to be the hero in that at-bat.
HEALTH
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
When the runners at this year's Maryland Half Marathon make their way across the finish line after 13.1 miles, Amy Babst plans to be there handing out medals with a smile. "It means so much to me to support those who are raising money to fight cancer," says the 29-year-old Linthicum resident. "Especially as a cancer survivor myself. I'm very lucky. And I have so much to live for. " Indeed, marathon co-founder Michael Greenebaum says the sixth annual race scheduled for May 10 in Howard County is about celebrating life.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
By the time Graham Peck was halfway up Heartbreak Hill during the Boston Marathon, he knew he'd be all right. The Fells Point resident had gone into Marathon Monday with a goal of finishing the 26.2-mile race in 2 hours and 28 minutes. Peck, running his first Boston Marathon, had made it up and over several other hills in Newton, Mass., and knew this hill, the course's most infamous obstacle, would be his most significant remaining challenge. "I think, at that point, with about six miles to go, is when I felt, 'I'm not going to screw up too much here,'" he said Tuesday.
FEATURES
By David Biancull and David Biancull,Contributing Writer | January 1, 1994
New Year's Day is a day of college football bowl games -- and of TV marathons. Regarding the latter, you can turn to Comedy Central at any point today (and until 10 p.m. tomorrow) and watch reruns of "Soap."Or, beginning at noon today, you can watch a marathon of 18 back-to-back USA Network telemovies -- though I wouldn't recommend it. This sounds like a joke, but isn't: All 18 of those movies are bad. Nickelodeon has its always-tapeable "Classic TV Countdown" (beginning at noon and running past midnight)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | July 25, 1997
Sex. Murder. Sex. Money. Sex. Alien abductions. Sex.From 1977 to 1981, that's what ABC offered American audiences hefty helpings of, thanks to "Soap," a sometimes brilliant, often stupid, rarely dull soap-opera spoof whose worst sin was the legacy it left behind: a spin-off, "Benson."But don't hold that against it. Rather, sit back and enjoy Comedy Central's "Soap" marathon (6 p.m.-4 a.m.), as the wealthy Tates and the blue-collar Campbells wage war on each other and on the rest of the world (the world usually wins)
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
Qualifying for the Boston Marathon was not on Michelle Hollingsworth's radar when she broke into a jog at the start of the Marine Corps Marathon in 2012, but it sure was 3 hours and 36 minutes later. The 47-year-old hadn't expected to cross the finish line in Rosslyn, Va., so quickly, fast enough to qualify for the prestigious 26.2-mile race that begins in Hopkinton and ends on Boylston Street in Boston. The disappointment came later, when she found that registration had closed for the 2013 Boston Marathon.
NEWS
By Catherine Rentz and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
Lynne Douglas stood frozen some 100 yards shy of the finish line at the Boston Marathon when the second bomb exploded, bringing last year's race to an abrupt and chaotic end. Today, the Columbia woman will run to overcome that moment. "We're running not to forget, but to replace the terror with a happy experience," said Douglas, 58. Douglas, whose leg was bruised by shrapnel, had expected the 2013 race to be her last marathon, the apex of running years that had begun in her 20s. But like dozens of other Maryland runners, she wants to create a new memory in place of the images of fallen runners, rising smoke and utter panic that defined last year's event.
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