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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | May 12, 1992
By an eerie coincidence, the Maryland Stage Company's production of "Marat/Sade" opened the day after the jury's decision in the Rodney King case. Watching the asylum workers trying to subdue patients with clubs in the play, it was impossible to divorce the theatrical images from the repeatedly broadcast videotape of the King beating.Nor should such an effort even have been attempted. As is suggested by its unwieldly unabridged title -- "The Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat as Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum of Charenton Under the Direction of the Marquis de Sade" -- Peter Weiss' drama is an examination of anarchy.
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NEWS
January 31, 2006
On January 28, 2006, FREDERICK B. BEADENKOPFF, SR.; dear husband of Ruth Naomi Beadenkopff; beloved father of Naomi Marat, Sharon Fremd and Frederick B., Jr.; loving brother of Hazel Stone; devoted grandfather of seven grand and eight great-grandchildren. The family will receive friends at Fink Funeral Home, P.A., 426 Crain Highway SW, at 5th Avenue, on Wednesday and Thursday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9, where services will be held on Friday, 1 P. M at the funeral home. Interment Loudon Park Cemetery.
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | May 12, 1992
By an eerie coincidence, the Maryland Stage Company's production of "Marat/Sade" opened the day after the jury's decision in the Rodney King case. Watching the asylum workers trying to subdue patients with clubs in the play, it was impossible to divorce the theatrical images from the repeatedly broadcast videotape of the King beating.Nor should such an effort even have been attempted. As is suggested by its unwieldly unabridged title -- "The Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat as Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum of Charenton Under the Direction of the Marquis de Sade" -- Peter Weiss' drama is an examination of anarchy.
SPORTS
By Charles Bricker and Charles Bricker,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | May 29, 2005
PARIS - As the fourth and final set reached the crisis point and Marat Safin's brilliance began to desert him, it seemed like only a matter of time until he produced one of his famous explosions. But for the third match in a row at this French Open, there were no smashed rackets or livid tirades. This time, Safin grasped the butt of the handle with one hand, the top of the frame with the other and feigned splintering it over his cocked knee. He then went about the business of shutting down 2003 champion Juan Carlos Ferrero, 7-6 (5)
NEWS
January 31, 2006
On January 28, 2006, FREDERICK B. BEADENKOPFF, SR.; dear husband of Ruth Naomi Beadenkopff; beloved father of Naomi Marat, Sharon Fremd and Frederick B., Jr.; loving brother of Hazel Stone; devoted grandfather of seven grand and eight great-grandchildren. The family will receive friends at Fink Funeral Home, P.A., 426 Crain Highway SW, at 5th Avenue, on Wednesday and Thursday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9, where services will be held on Friday, 1 P. M at the funeral home. Interment Loudon Park Cemetery.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2001
NEW YORK - The crowd's outbursts around Arthur Ashe Stadium took on an almost rhythmic repetition - "Pete ... Marat ... Pete. Marat. Pete ... Break him!" And No. 10 seed Pete Sampras, 30, responding perhaps not so much to the crowd but to his inner spirit, bullied his way into today's men's U.S. Open final. He shook his fists, urged the umpire into an overrule that gave him an ace to set up a hold on his own serve, pointed into cameras and kissed his racket, as he worked systematically toward a 6-3, 7-6 (5)
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2002
NEW YORK - The U.S. Open. Such serious business. So serious Gustavo Kuerten warmed up by going to the WNBA Finals at Madison Square Garden, settling into a courtside seat with an oversized bag of popcorn and cheering for the New York Liberty the night before his big, second-round match with No. 2 seed Marat Safin. "Oh, very nice," he said of the basketball game. "They always try to intimidate each other. I liked it very much. I was wishing the last seconds would have decided for New York, but L.A. pushed too hard."
SPORTS
By Charles Bricker and Charles Bricker,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | May 29, 2005
PARIS - As the fourth and final set reached the crisis point and Marat Safin's brilliance began to desert him, it seemed like only a matter of time until he produced one of his famous explosions. But for the third match in a row at this French Open, there were no smashed rackets or livid tirades. This time, Safin grasped the butt of the handle with one hand, the top of the frame with the other and feigned splintering it over his cocked knee. He then went about the business of shutting down 2003 champion Juan Carlos Ferrero, 7-6 (5)
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 4, 2001
WIMBLEDON, England - The last time a British man won Wimbledon, Franklin Roosevelt was in the White House and the Summer Olympics were in Berlin. So you can only imagine the pressure that is piled on the slender shoulders of Britain's only decent home-grown tennis player, Tim Henman. Every year, Henman is billed as the Briton most likely to duplicate the feat of Fred Perry in 1936 and win Wimbledon. And every year Henman fails, including twice in the semifinals, twice in the quarterfinals and, usually, on the 3rd of July.
NEWS
By Myron Beckenstein | July 26, 1992
RED ODYSSEY.Marat Akchurin.HarperCollins.406 pages. $25.7/8 "I . . . made a death mask of what was formerly the Soviet Union," writes Marat Akchurin of what he accomplished in "Red Odyssey." "That country no longer exists and never will again."That was the result, not what he set out to do, because when he left on his backwater tour in 1990 the Soviet Union still was sputtering along and the unimaginable events of August 1991 were still unimaginable.Most of the news westerners got about the Soviet republics dealt with Moscow and the major Russian cities.
SPORTS
By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2004
WIMBLEDON, England - The day was unpleasant - dank and gray and worthy of producing grouches and grinches. So maybe Marat Safin's mind and body were swallowed up by the ugliness of the weather yesterday. If there is another explanation for a world-ranked tennis player abandoning his pride and bailing out on a final point while being featured on a show court at Wimbledon, then whining about the difficulty of dragging his cranky self around the grass courts of Wimbledon, it might be best not to learn about it. Safin, 24, the 19th seed, winner of one U.S. Open title and twice an Australian Open finalist, most recently in January, was summarily dismissed by 21-year-old Russian countryman Dmitry Tursunov, 4-6, 7-5, 6-3, 7-6 (7-1)
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2002
NEW YORK - The U.S. Open. Such serious business. So serious Gustavo Kuerten warmed up by going to the WNBA Finals at Madison Square Garden, settling into a courtside seat with an oversized bag of popcorn and cheering for the New York Liberty the night before his big, second-round match with No. 2 seed Marat Safin. "Oh, very nice," he said of the basketball game. "They always try to intimidate each other. I liked it very much. I was wishing the last seconds would have decided for New York, but L.A. pushed too hard."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2001
NEW YORK - The crowd's outbursts around Arthur Ashe Stadium took on an almost rhythmic repetition - "Pete ... Marat ... Pete. Marat. Pete ... Break him!" And No. 10 seed Pete Sampras, 30, responding perhaps not so much to the crowd but to his inner spirit, bullied his way into today's men's U.S. Open final. He shook his fists, urged the umpire into an overrule that gave him an ace to set up a hold on his own serve, pointed into cameras and kissed his racket, as he worked systematically toward a 6-3, 7-6 (5)
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2001
NEW YORK - No. 1 Martina Hingis and No. 2 Jennifer Capriati are all that stand in the way today of an all-Williams U.S. Open Final. Since the seeds were posted, fans have wondered if defending Open champ Venus Williams and her sister Serena, the 1999 Open champ, would make it through their draws to meet in tomorrow night's prime-time final. "We'll see," Venus said, after moving to the semifinals where she'll meet Capriati in today's second semifinal. "We've each got another match to play and each of us is up against a good player."
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 4, 2001
WIMBLEDON, England - The last time a British man won Wimbledon, Franklin Roosevelt was in the White House and the Summer Olympics were in Berlin. So you can only imagine the pressure that is piled on the slender shoulders of Britain's only decent home-grown tennis player, Tim Henman. Every year, Henman is billed as the Briton most likely to duplicate the feat of Fred Perry in 1936 and win Wimbledon. And every year Henman fails, including twice in the semifinals, twice in the quarterfinals and, usually, on the 3rd of July.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 30, 2001
WIMBLEDON, England - Wimbledon got the full Goran Ivanisevic yesterday. All three of them. And a strip show. Ivanisevic showed off his three-dimensional personality and sonic serve yesterday to oust Andy Roddick, 7-6 (5), 7-5, 3-6, 6-3, and storm into Wimbledon's round of 16. Ivanisevic smacked 41 service aces. He played the role of the 29-year-old, broken-down veteran against the 18-year-old rising star, the nearly Wimbledon champion against the champion in waiting. And he took the kid to grass-court school.
SPORTS
By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2004
WIMBLEDON, England - The day was unpleasant - dank and gray and worthy of producing grouches and grinches. So maybe Marat Safin's mind and body were swallowed up by the ugliness of the weather yesterday. If there is another explanation for a world-ranked tennis player abandoning his pride and bailing out on a final point while being featured on a show court at Wimbledon, then whining about the difficulty of dragging his cranky self around the grass courts of Wimbledon, it might be best not to learn about it. Safin, 24, the 19th seed, winner of one U.S. Open title and twice an Australian Open finalist, most recently in January, was summarily dismissed by 21-year-old Russian countryman Dmitry Tursunov, 4-6, 7-5, 6-3, 7-6 (7-1)
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2001
NEW YORK - No. 1 Martina Hingis and No. 2 Jennifer Capriati are all that stand in the way today of an all-Williams U.S. Open Final. Since the seeds were posted, fans have wondered if defending Open champ Venus Williams and her sister Serena, the 1999 Open champ, would make it through their draws to meet in tomorrow night's prime-time final. "We'll see," Venus said, after moving to the semifinals where she'll meet Capriati in today's second semifinal. "We've each got another match to play and each of us is up against a good player."
NEWS
By Myron Beckenstein | July 26, 1992
RED ODYSSEY.Marat Akchurin.HarperCollins.406 pages. $25.7/8 "I . . . made a death mask of what was formerly the Soviet Union," writes Marat Akchurin of what he accomplished in "Red Odyssey." "That country no longer exists and never will again."That was the result, not what he set out to do, because when he left on his backwater tour in 1990 the Soviet Union still was sputtering along and the unimaginable events of August 1991 were still unimaginable.Most of the news westerners got about the Soviet republics dealt with Moscow and the major Russian cities.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | May 12, 1992
By an eerie coincidence, the Maryland Stage Company's production of "Marat/Sade" opened the day after the jury's decision in the Rodney King case. Watching the asylum workers trying to subdue patients with clubs in the play, it was impossible to divorce the theatrical images from the repeatedly broadcast videotape of the King beating.Nor should such an effort even have been attempted. As is suggested by its unwieldly unabridged title -- "The Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat as Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum of Charenton Under the Direction of the Marquis de Sade" -- Peter Weiss' drama is an examination of anarchy.
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