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NEWS
March 21, 2010
Maple syrup lovers can get a second helping this weekend at three Maryland state parks. Syrup-making demonstrations are planned today from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Cunningham Falls State Park near Thurmont. Pancake breakfasts are available today from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Cunningham Falls. Pancakes also will be served today from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Herrington Manor State Park near Oakland, along with a syrup-making demonstration. - Associated Press
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ENTERTAINMENT
For The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2013
Jeffrey Clayton from Baltimore was hoping someone would have the recipe for the sticky buns that were served in the cafeterias at Garrison Junior High and Forest Park High school back in the 1950s when he and his wife were students there. Unfortunately, I did not receive any recipes for those particular goodies, but I did get a super-easy and delicious recipe for making sticky buns from Helen Braun of Charleston, S.C., that I decided to try. She said she frequently makes these when she has last-minute company or if she just wants to treat her kids on a weekend morning.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2011
At first, the clear liquid doesn't quite resemble the thick, gooey brown substance dribbled across pancakes and French toast, but naturalists assured the crowds gathered Saturday at Oregon Ridge Park that the sap tapped from maple trees, with a little elbow grease, would make maple syrup. Several hundred came for tours led by the Baltimore County park employees over the weekend for the annual Maple Sugar Weekend held each February, when weather conditions help the flow of sap with cold nights and warmer days.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2013
The plink, plink, plink of sap hitting the bottom of a metal bucket is music to Sheryl Pedrick's ears, she says. That means there will be a symphony in the woods around Ladew Topiary Gardens in Monkton in the weeks ahead. The education coordinator at the gardens has been tapping the maple trees the old-fashioned way - with a hand drill and metal spouts and stainless steel buckets that she's collected from farm sales - and before the season ends in March, she will have collected 30 or 40 gallons of sap and boiled it down until it becomes the delicious amber-colored syrup that puts Aunt Jemima to shame.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk and Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 9, 2001
THE WOODLAND TRAILS meandering through Downs Park are, for the most part, empty this time of year. The warm-weather crowds of day-tripping families, joggers, bike riders and concert-goers have given way in recent weeks to a few hardy volunteers traipsing through the underbrush. They're looking for sap - collecting it from plastic jugs attached to trees - for making maple syrup in an annual public demonstration. The production will get under way this weekend at the temporary maple sugar shack in the park's Brightwater Pavilion.
NEWS
By CINDY PARR | February 27, 1995
Last week gave us all hope that spring might make an early return.The weather was quite wonderful at the beginning of the week, making outside activities enjoyable.Let us hope that we have similar weather toward the end of this week for the 10th annual Maple Sugarin' Festival at Hashawha Environmental Center in Westminster.The festival, scheduled from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday, will celebrate the tradition of collecting maple sap and boiling it into maple syrup.Families are invited to attend and enjoy taste testing, programs and films on maple-syrup making.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 31, 1998
GORMAN -- In a scene that recalls images from a Li'l Abner cartoon, a cloud of steam -- rich with the fragrance of maple water -- drifts from the aged shack with the weathered board siding and sheet-metal roof perched on the side of a hill.It's maple syrup production time, and a new generation of the Steyer family is busy keeping up a tradition that dates back more than 100 years."My daddy used to say he could go up on the top of this hill and see the steam rising from 19 or 20 sugar maple camps and a like number of moonshine operations," Michael Steyer said as he stirred a boiling tank of "maple water," or sap, slowly being transformed into syrup.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | March 14, 1999
THURMONT -- From the Catoctin Mountains in Frederick County comes this message: Forget Vermont.Maryland isn't renowned for producing syrup, but the folks who trekked here yesterday for a celebration of the state's sticky stuff were acting as if they were in a new maple heaven.Seminars on how sap is extracted from maple trees drew hordes of visitors, and the lines for pancakes poured out the door."I've been a big fan of maple products for a long, long time," offered one visitor, Crystal Testerman of Bel Air. "I never thought a lot about Maryland being a maple state."
NEWS
By Jennifer Blenner and Jennifer Blenner,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2003
To most people, the snow melting and flowers beginning to bloom signify the first signs of spring. But at the Eden Mill Nature Center in Pylesville, the last two weeks of February and the first two weeks of March signify the running of the sap from maple trees. Last weekend, more than 20 area residents gathered at the nature center's first family-night program of the year to learn the history, make spiles, or spigots, and get instructions for production of maple syrup in their own back yards.
FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood and Dorothy Fleetwood,Contributing Writer | March 5, 1995
In March, when days are warmer and nights still cool, sap begins to run in the maples. This is the time to tap the trees to collect their golden syrup. Many sites offer an opportunity to see this process, which was taught to settlers by Native Americans.One big celebration is in Highland County, Va., where the 37th annual Maple Festival takes place over two weekends. The celebration next weekend and March 18-19 includes tours of the area sugar camps, a huge arts and crafts show, a Maple Queen and a Maple Queen Ball, free entertainment and food.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | February 11, 2013
Oh, the physical sacrifices I make for my job as a journalist. True, I have never been assaulted by a mob in Cairo's Tahrir Square, as CBS' Lara Logan was. And I've never been injured by a bomb, as happened to ABC's Bob Woodruff and CBS' Kimberly Dozier in Iraq. In fact, the last time I left Maryland for an assignment, it was to cover the Philadelphia Flower Show, and that's not exactly hazard duty. But I am recovering from injuries suffered while writing a food story for our Wednesday Taste section, and I'd like a little more attention to my suffering than I got in the emergency room.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
Sue Pierce from South Bend, Ind., wrote in looking for a recipe for making elephant ears, the kind that you can get at many local fairs across the country. She said her mom loves them and she was hoping someone would be able to share an easy recipe so that she could make them for her at home. Beth Raker from Mishawaka, Ind., saw Pierce's request and sent in a recipe that she said was given to her by a teacher who served as a missionary in Mexico. She said she has enjoyed making these with her children and grandchildren for at least 25 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | January 24, 2012
Adrian Ross-Boon, head bartender at Wit and Wisdom in Harbor East, won't make you a drink - he will build you one. The bar and restaurant, located on the ground floor of the new Four Seasons hotel, adheres to the sage-like philosophy of layering flavors to ensure a distinct, high-quality taste experience. At the bar, Ross-Boon and company take the technical aspect of serving drinks to a whole new level. "We make classic cocktails the way they should be done: fresh juices daily, we make our own syrups, bitters, and infusions ... we even use cold draft ice cubes so that your drink never waters down," said Ross-Boon.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | January 3, 2012
Just because the holidays are over and we're into a new year, that doesn't mean the need for "roast beast" is over. Hearty winter dinners are still the order of the evening, but cold weather eating doesn't have to be all about stews and soups. You can serve up some easy (and relatively quick) meals with a bit of finesse, using pork tenderloin and coordinating it with whatever flavoring elements you decide to add. Pork tenderloin is a tempting entree item since it's generally lean and mild, is easy and quick to fix and with planovers in mind, it can star in later weekday dinners, like stir-fries, quick pasta or hot sandwiches.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2011
Anne Stein from Baltimore wrote in looking for a good recipe for oatmeal scones. Susan Bacon from Knoxville, Tenn., sent in her favorite recipe for making oatmeal scones. It comes from "The Barefoot Contessa Cookbook" by Ina Garten. She said these scones are easy to make and always well liked by young and old. Unlike some scones that can tend to be on the dry side, these turned out light and soft on the inside with a slight crunch on the outside. You can control the degree of sweetness with the amount of glaze you use. While the recipe says it makes 14 scones I found it made quite a few more than that.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2011
At first, the clear liquid doesn't quite resemble the thick, gooey brown substance dribbled across pancakes and French toast, but naturalists assured the crowds gathered Saturday at Oregon Ridge Park that the sap tapped from maple trees, with a little elbow grease, would make maple syrup. Several hundred came for tours led by the Baltimore County park employees over the weekend for the annual Maple Sugar Weekend held each February, when weather conditions help the flow of sap with cold nights and warmer days.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | February 19, 2006
On a brisk sunny afternoon, several mothers and their children carried galvanized buckets, drills and hammers into the woods surrounding Bear Branch Nature Center in Westminster. They identified the tallest, hardiest maple trees, mostly by their silvery white bark, and set to work on the first phase of a process that could end with maple syrup. "Mom, drill please," said Victoria Dinisa, 9, of Littlestown, Pa. "I need to make a big hole." Actually, Victoria only needed to twist and turn the hand drill, called a brace and bit, long enough to place a 2-inch hole in the thick bark.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | February 11, 2013
Oh, the physical sacrifices I make for my job as a journalist. True, I have never been assaulted by a mob in Cairo's Tahrir Square, as CBS' Lara Logan was. And I've never been injured by a bomb, as happened to ABC's Bob Woodruff and CBS' Kimberly Dozier in Iraq. In fact, the last time I left Maryland for an assignment, it was to cover the Philadelphia Flower Show, and that's not exactly hazard duty. But I am recovering from injuries suffered while writing a food story for our Wednesday Taste section, and I'd like a little more attention to my suffering than I got in the emergency room.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | November 23, 2010
As I write this, Thanksgiving is only hours away, and I still have no idea what I am serving. There will be a turkey, of course. And potatoes and vegetables and stuffing and gravy. But exactly what form these basic elements will take is still under discussion with my daughter, who believes she was cruelly separated at birth from Ina Garten. I call it "Thanksgiving in the time of the Food Network: All bets are off. " These cooking shows — which are to college students what soap operas were to us when we were in school — have produced a generation of confident young cooks who don't think you have to have years of practice under your belt before you prepare your first truffle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper | March 31, 2010
A sk Lucie L. Snodgrass what she would recommend for Easter dinner and she does not simply say lamb. Instead, she says, "some of Edwin's lamb." She is referring to what would be an extremely local main dish, a lamb raised by her Harford County neighbor and cookbook collaborator, Edwin Remsberg. Remsberg is a photographer who worked with Snodgrass to produce a striking new cookbook, "Dishing Up Maryland." The book contains 150 recipes featuring local fare from Maryland farmers, watermen and restaurateurs.
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