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NEWS
May 29, 2012
After many years of frustration, the map accompanying the story about waterfront development near White Marsh ("Battle lines form over site near bay," May 25) forces me to ask: When is The Sun going to provide graphics containing useful information pertinent to the story? For example, the article describes 292 acres of woods and fields now zoned for conservation. Wouldn't a topographic map or aerial view have been a better depiction of the land and the surrounding area? And how about introducing actual property lines rather than a dot indicating the general area?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
A winter forecast map that is going viral and suggests above-normal snowfall for most of the country -- and "well above-normal" snow for the mid-Atlantic and New England -- comes from a satire website. The story has been shared widely across social media, carrying the headline "Meteorologists Predict Record-Shattering Snowfall Coming Soon. " The accompanying map forecasts an unusually snowy winter for about two-thirds of the country, and a corridor of even heavier snow from Virginia to Maine.
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NEWS
July 16, 2012
Now that the "Political map is headed for vote" (July 12), The Sun could do the voters of Maryland a big favor by printing a separate map of each individual congressional district. While the overall map merely looks like a crazy quilt of lines and colors, when one looks at the individual map of each district the incredible gerrymandering is obvious. This is especially true of Districts 2, 3, 4, 7 and 8. Let's show the voters exactly what our politicians have been up to! Bob Vaughan, Lutherville
TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
"Monocacy" is an Americanized version of the Shawnee word "Monnockkesy," which means "river of many bends," and the Monocacy River lives up to its name. Though my kayak glides calmly under my kayak through the opaque green water, I struggle to keep up with my guide, Andy Lett, recreation supervisor for the Frederick County Department of Parks and Recreation. Whenever I get the hang of things, dipping one oar and then another to propel myself in a relatively straight line, another curve arrives to confuse me, and I have to stop to change direction so I don't paddle right into the riverbank.
NEWS
October 18, 2011
Maryland's legislature should take the time to develop congressional districts that make sense. Democratic officials have said that the current map was just a starting point from which to develop new districts, which sounds good on the surface. But if we continue to take that approach every 10 years, the congressional district maps will get more and more ridiculous. Surely the data and computer software are available, or can be reasonably developed, to lay out congressional districts that look reasonable on a map and that group constituents with similar interests together.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2011
A congressional map drafted by Maryland Democrats drew more opposition Wednesday as Republican leaders offered alternative proposals, the state NAACP requested changes and the O'Malley administration released 600 comments — mostly critical — submitted by citizens. Gov. Martin O'Malley's office said it was unclear when he will unveil his final proposal to the General Assembly, which will meet in special session next week to approve new boundaries for the state's eight congressional districts.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2011
Three federal judges expressed skepticism Tuesday that Maryland's political mapmakers intentionally diluted black voting power when they drew new congressional districts, as the map's opponents have argued. The three-judge panel held a hearing in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt to determine whether the state's new congressional map passes constitutional muster. Judge Paul V. Neimeyer, one of the three deciding the matter, said that the General Assembly-approved plan appeared to be drawn with an eye toward ensuring that some incumbent members of Congress would be re-elected.
NEWS
November 17, 2011
As a representative for a non-partisan legislative group, my position requires me to see as many people and businesses in Maryland as I can every day to get their opinions on urgent issues facing the federal government At the end of the week, I amass these opinion ballots and send them to Congress. In order to do this correctly, I enter an official Congressional website and post the addresses of these constituents to ensure that I am sending their ballots to the correct elected official.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2012
Comptroller Peter Franchot broke with Democratic Party leaders Tuesday as he urged voters to reject the congressional redistricting map drawn by Gov. Martin O'Malley and the General Assembly. During a radio appearance on WBAL, Franchot  said the map has "embarrassed our state" and called for future redistricting plans to be developed by a bipartisan commission instead of legislators and the governor. The congressional map, which the courts have upheld even though some judges criticized it as an obvious case of gerrymandering, was petitioned to referendum through the efforts of mostly Republican activists.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2011
A chorus of Democratic officials concerned about minority voters in the Washington suburbs said Tuesday that they oppose the new congressional districts proposed by Gov. Martin O'Malley's redistricting commission, setting up a key battle as the General Assembly prepares to take up the issue. Led by Rep. Donna F. Edwards, the African-American congresswoman from Prince George's County, the downstate Democrats say the proposed districts do not reflect the recent growth of black and Hispanic communities, particularly in Montgomery County.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2014
William Smith's disease has grim milestones. At 2, the Gambrills triplet known as Mick couldn't walk or talk as well as his siblings. In kindergarten, he started losing language and motor skills. At 12, he needed a wheelchair and a feeding tube. Doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital dedicated to treating his symptoms said he had an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease. But a new test may provide something the family has long sought: a name. "The idea that there is something out there that can tell you [what's wrong]
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | June 3, 2014
There is no near-term downside to the Baltimore area enjoying a week at the center of the golf universe in late July. The inaugural LPGA International Crown, which will bring together 32 top women from eight countries for a new-concept team competition at Caves Valley Golf Club, is going to be a major event with significant global reach. And we're not even going to have to tear up any light rail tracks or turn downtown into a traffic nightmare to make it possible. There are no major infrastructure issues like the ones that made the Baltimore Grand Prix such a tough sell and there is nothing to boil the blood of local commuters and jilted business owners - just a classy showcase event at a classy location that will show off both Baltimore City and Baltimore County to millions of potential visitors worldwide.
SPORTS
Trevor Hass and The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
Maryland baseball coach John Szefc paused and looked forward, trying to articulate just how special it was to be part of the Terps ' first NCAA tournament team in 43 years. Szefc was just 4 years old when Maryland lost its first two games in Gastonia, N.C., in the 1971 national tourney. "It's kind of hard for me to wrap my mind around that," Szefc said. Since then, the program has endured 27 losing seasons in 43 years, failing to compete with perennial Atlantic Coast Conference powerhouses such as North Carolina State, Georgia Tech, Virginia and Florida State.
TRAVEL
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Just because you're on vacation at the shore doesn't mean every drink has to come with a tiny beach umbrella. Pitch the slushy or cosmopolitan, and think more along the lines of craft. Craft beer, that is. For a long time, beer drinkers lacked choices beyond "light or dark?" But the increasingly popular craft beer movement has expanded in imbibers' minds the possibilities for beer. Independent microbreweries have existed for years, but America's growing appreciation of small-batch, handcrafted products - and their never-quenched love of beer - seem to signal that this trend is not going away.
NEWS
By T'Jae Gibson | May 7, 2014
She was part of the first graduating class of the Science and Math Academy at Aberdeen High School. When it opened, some thought it was hard to get students to compete for admission. Now, it's clear the challenge is getting past the waiting list. For Christine Harvey, 23, her enrollment there led her to an experience her senior year of high school that helped shape her future. She accepted an internship at the Army Research Laboratory working with David Webb, a mathematical statistician in the weapon and materials research area.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
A New York Times interactive map posted yesterday could settle the debate about which Baltimore-area communities show the most support for the hometown O's. The outstanding infographic uses a team's Facebook "Likes" in a given area to determine fandom within every ZIP code in the country, and in Maryland, it shows about what you'd expect. The Orioles are the dominant team, in terms of percentage of fans, in the Baltimore metro region, with the Nationals gaining a stronghold in D.C. suburbs and the Phillies only creeping across the border in the eastern Maryland towns that border Delaware.
NEWS
By Paul McCardell | May 12, 2012
The weather map was first published in an American newspaper on May 12, 1876, at the International Exposition at Philadelphia, according to the U.S. Weather Bureau. The New York Herald was working with the Weather Bureau, which telegraphed data to make a demonstration map. The weather map didn't begin to appear regularly in a newspaper until May 9, 1879, in the New York Daily Graphic. USA Today first published on Sept. 15, 1982, and revolutionized the weather map with color and more data, causing the newspaper industry to change and update.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2011
Above, find a high-resolution map of Merriweather Post Pavilion grounds on Saturday for Virgin FreeFest. The map looks much like last year's. There are three stages: a dance forest, a festival stage on the venue's West side, and a main stage at the amphitheater. There will again be a ferris wheel. The heart of the venue will be again commandeered by festival sponsor Kyocera. Doors will open at 11 a.m. The first band goes up at noon on the dance forest stage. The full schedule is here .
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | April 14, 2014
York Road is the main thoroughfare in downtown Towson and those commuters who travel it on a daily basis know the congestion around the intersection of York and Burke Avenue during rush hour. The crossroads have been deemed by the county as a failing intersection, meaning congestion is a critical issue because the crossroads cannot handle the amount of vehicles it sees at a given time. However, Baltimore County officials say the stretch of York Road just north of Burke Avenue is exempt from a development moratorium in place near failing intersections — according to its annual Basic Services Map, which designates infrastructure and traffic needs across the county.
NEWS
March 14, 2014
Lord and Lady Crawley, the Earl and Countess of Grantham, made an appearance. So did their daughters, the ladies Mary, Edith and Sybil, along with Carson, the butler, and assorted lady's maids, valets and footmen. When fans of "Downton Abbey" were invited to masquerade as their favorite character on the hit television series, 500 people showed up at the Gordon Center for Performing Arts, dressed from haute to humble. On a wintry afternoon in February, Randi Benesch sat in her office at the Jewish Community Center Owings Mills and talked about the event.
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