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By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2005
PINEHURST, N.C. - The champion of the 105th U.S. Open at the Pinehurst Resort and Country Club was not only the tournament's best player, but also one of the sport's more intriguing personalities. Michael Campbell, the 36-year-old native New Zealander who beat Tiger Woods by two strokes Sunday and drew even in his four-day battle with the No. 2 course, has family roots that go back to his country's indigenous Maori culture as well as to Scotland, the game's ancestral home. A Maori symbol for kikikaha - meaning inner strength, Campbell said - was printed on the back of his shirt, and a player for whom stardom was once predicted showed enough of it to make his countrymen proud.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | November 7, 2013
The Super Bowl champion Baltimore Ravens have three wins and five losses; they just lost to the Cleveland Browns for the first time in seven seasons, and they play the conference-leading Cincinnati Bengals on Sunday. So I'll say this: The home team could use a Maori haka right about now, and I know where to get one. The Baltimore-Chesapeake Brumbies, the city's entry in the Mid-Atlantic Rugby Football Union, have been practicing the haka - the most famous pre-game ritual in the world - for the last seven weeks.
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NEWS
By EILEEN SOSKIN and EILEEN SOSKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 2, 2005
Diversity will be in the air tomorrow night when the Candlelight Concert Society presents the New Zealand String Quartet in a program of two of the most beloved string quartets in Western music plus a piece for string quartet and taonga puoro (Maori instruments made from gourds). The program, at 8 p.m. in Smith Theatre at Howard Community College, sandwiches Hine-pu-te-hue (the name of the Maori goddess of peace) between Haydn's String Quartet, Op. 76, No. 4 ("Sunrise") and Beethoven's String Quartet Op. 132. event begins at 6:45 p.m. Information: 410-480-9950, or www.candlelightconcerts.
NEWS
May 10, 2013
Just so your readers know, His Holiness the Dalai Lama was having fun with his fellow dignitaries at the end of his lecture Tuesday at the University of Maryland ("At UM, a face-to-face with the Dalai Lama," May 8). He demonstrated various forms of taking leave of another person - shaking a hand, giving a hug, a kiss on a cheek or touching foreheads (a traditional Tibetan form). He also demonstrated rubbing noses with Gov. Martin O'Malley, a form the Tibetan spiritual leader attributed to the Maori.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | March 3, 1995
New York. -- "Once Were Warriors,'' a film from New Zealand that opened last week in just two small theaters, is a startling and profoundly depressing statement on the human condition everywhere -- a movie about hell in a small place that should be paradise. It makes the most recent serious American movies on race and rage -- ''Boyz 'N the Hood'' being the best of them -- seem like Disney.And you should read the book! As rough as it is, the film about the life of Maoris today -- descendants of the Polynesian warriors who got to New Zealand hundreds of years before the white man came with his Bible, and guns and rum -- is significantly toned down from the relentless 1990 novel of the same name by Alan Duff.
NEWS
July 29, 1997
Irving Geis,88, an artist who illuminated the wonders of science, from the vastness of space to the intricacies of molecular structures, died of a cerebral hemorrhage July 22 at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New YorkFor much of his career, the Manhattan resident regularly contributed illustrations to Scientific American, helping readers visualize material about astronomy, astrophysics, geophysics, biochemistry and the like.Mr. Geis supplied the journal's first drawings of Sputniks in orbit, continental drift and the double helix of DNA.His innovations in biomolecular art gave him an international reputation, serving as a guide for generations of researchers and science students.
SPORTS
By Bruce Stannard and Bruce Stannard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 21, 1998
AUCKLAND, New Zealand - Auckland is known as "The City of Sails," and with good reason. It seems everyone here either has a boat or has access to one, and they are almost always out on the water.When the Whitbread Round the World Race fleet came barreling up the Hauraki Gulf toward the pale green shallows of Auckland's Waitemata Harbour, it seemed as if the entire city had become waterborne to meet them.Tens of thousands of people lined the grassy hills around the harbor, and thousands more joined a joyous flotilla of welcome.
NEWS
May 10, 2013
Just so your readers know, His Holiness the Dalai Lama was having fun with his fellow dignitaries at the end of his lecture Tuesday at the University of Maryland ("At UM, a face-to-face with the Dalai Lama," May 8). He demonstrated various forms of taking leave of another person - shaking a hand, giving a hug, a kiss on a cheek or touching foreheads (a traditional Tibetan form). He also demonstrated rubbing noses with Gov. Martin O'Malley, a form the Tibetan spiritual leader attributed to the Maori.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic Sun pop music critic J.D. Considine contributed to this report | July 10, 1994
Artscape is always a huge potpourri of pop music, food, poetry readings and -- believe it or not -- art. This year's version of the annual festival, which begins Friday, will be even more so. It will include opera, a one-act play, cars as art, and a Maori dance group, among other new attractions."
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2010
Poi dancers might not be in great demand outside New Zealand, but Adrian Galvin is hoping the skill he has developed in the ancient Maori hand-strengthening routine will land him a walk-on role at the Cirque Dreams show starting next month in Baltimore. Galvin, a 22-year-old student at the University of Maryland, College Park, said the fuzzy balls at the end of the short ropes he twirled would ordinarily be on fire. But he imagined that a more authentic presentation might note have been appreciated by the management of the Hunt Valley Town Centre shopping center, where he and nine other performers tried out Saturday for a single spot in "Cirque Dreams Illumination," the new show scheduled to open Oct. 5 at the Hippodrome Theatre.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2010
Poi dancers might not be in great demand outside New Zealand, but Adrian Galvin is hoping the skill he has developed in the ancient Maori hand-strengthening routine will land him a walk-on role at the Cirque Dreams show starting next month in Baltimore. Galvin, a 22-year-old student at the University of Maryland, College Park, said the fuzzy balls at the end of the short ropes he twirled would ordinarily be on fire. But he imagined that a more authentic presentation might note have been appreciated by the management of the Hunt Valley Town Centre shopping center, where he and nine other performers tried out Saturday for a single spot in "Cirque Dreams Illumination," the new show scheduled to open Oct. 5 at the Hippodrome Theatre.
NEWS
By EILEEN SOSKIN and EILEEN SOSKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 2, 2005
Diversity will be in the air tomorrow night when the Candlelight Concert Society presents the New Zealand String Quartet in a program of two of the most beloved string quartets in Western music plus a piece for string quartet and taonga puoro (Maori instruments made from gourds). The program, at 8 p.m. in Smith Theatre at Howard Community College, sandwiches Hine-pu-te-hue (the name of the Maori goddess of peace) between Haydn's String Quartet, Op. 76, No. 4 ("Sunrise") and Beethoven's String Quartet Op. 132. event begins at 6:45 p.m. Information: 410-480-9950, or www.candlelightconcerts.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2005
PINEHURST, N.C. - The champion of the 105th U.S. Open at the Pinehurst Resort and Country Club was not only the tournament's best player, but also one of the sport's more intriguing personalities. Michael Campbell, the 36-year-old native New Zealander who beat Tiger Woods by two strokes Sunday and drew even in his four-day battle with the No. 2 course, has family roots that go back to his country's indigenous Maori culture as well as to Scotland, the game's ancestral home. A Maori symbol for kikikaha - meaning inner strength, Campbell said - was printed on the back of his shirt, and a player for whom stardom was once predicted showed enough of it to make his countrymen proud.
SPORTS
By Bruce Stannard and Bruce Stannard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 21, 1998
AUCKLAND, New Zealand - Auckland is known as "The City of Sails," and with good reason. It seems everyone here either has a boat or has access to one, and they are almost always out on the water.When the Whitbread Round the World Race fleet came barreling up the Hauraki Gulf toward the pale green shallows of Auckland's Waitemata Harbour, it seemed as if the entire city had become waterborne to meet them.Tens of thousands of people lined the grassy hills around the harbor, and thousands more joined a joyous flotilla of welcome.
NEWS
July 29, 1997
Irving Geis,88, an artist who illuminated the wonders of science, from the vastness of space to the intricacies of molecular structures, died of a cerebral hemorrhage July 22 at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New YorkFor much of his career, the Manhattan resident regularly contributed illustrations to Scientific American, helping readers visualize material about astronomy, astrophysics, geophysics, biochemistry and the like.Mr. Geis supplied the journal's first drawings of Sputniks in orbit, continental drift and the double helix of DNA.His innovations in biomolecular art gave him an international reputation, serving as a guide for generations of researchers and science students.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | March 3, 1995
New York. -- "Once Were Warriors,'' a film from New Zealand that opened last week in just two small theaters, is a startling and profoundly depressing statement on the human condition everywhere -- a movie about hell in a small place that should be paradise. It makes the most recent serious American movies on race and rage -- ''Boyz 'N the Hood'' being the best of them -- seem like Disney.And you should read the book! As rough as it is, the film about the life of Maoris today -- descendants of the Polynesian warriors who got to New Zealand hundreds of years before the white man came with his Bible, and guns and rum -- is significantly toned down from the relentless 1990 novel of the same name by Alan Duff.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | November 7, 2013
The Super Bowl champion Baltimore Ravens have three wins and five losses; they just lost to the Cleveland Browns for the first time in seven seasons, and they play the conference-leading Cincinnati Bengals on Sunday. So I'll say this: The home team could use a Maori haka right about now, and I know where to get one. The Baltimore-Chesapeake Brumbies, the city's entry in the Mid-Atlantic Rugby Football Union, have been practicing the haka - the most famous pre-game ritual in the world - for the last seven weeks.
TRAVEL
May 3, 2009
My husband, Tom, and I live in Elkridge. In December and January, we went on a five-week adventure, traveling through Australia and New Zealand. In Rotorua, New Zealand, we took this shot of the steam pools. Rotorua is on the North Island among a thermally active region with volcanoes and geysers. It is a center of the native Maori culture. The Baltimore Sun welcomes submissions for "My Best Shot." Photos should have been taken within the past year and be accompanied by a description of when and where you took the picture and your name, address and phone number.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic Sun pop music critic J.D. Considine contributed to this report | July 10, 1994
Artscape is always a huge potpourri of pop music, food, poetry readings and -- believe it or not -- art. This year's version of the annual festival, which begins Friday, will be even more so. It will include opera, a one-act play, cars as art, and a Maori dance group, among other new attractions."
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