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By Los Angeles Times | December 27, 1993
BEIJING -- On the 100th anniversary of Mao Tse-tung's birth, President Jiang Zemin yesterday called on the Chinese people to remember the late leader as a national hero who nevertheless made many grave mistakes that the country's current leadership is still trying to rectify.Mr. Jiang's nationally televised speech at the Great Hall of the People first praised Mao and then diminished him, casting paramount leader Deng Xiaoping as the man who saved China from Mao's errors. Mr. Deng, 89 and believed to be ailing, did not appear in public to acknowledge the anniversary.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | August 12, 2013
Not long ago, I wrote about a law in China, home of the one-child limit, requiring the kids to attend to the financial and emotional needs of their parents. The law was put in place in part to restore China's traditional veneration of ancestors - replaced under Mao with devotion to the state - and because China has little social safety net for its enormous aging population. I took the opportunity to whine that my children, if we lived in China, would be in jail or a re-education camp by now because they don't pay as much attention to me as I want.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff | January 18, 2000
"Mao: A Life," by Philip Short. Henry Holt and Co. 784 pages. $35. By any measure, Mao Tse-tung ranks as one of the great killers of the 20th century. Two of his worst policies, the Great Leap Forward (1958-1961) and the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976), cost China an estimated 30 million lives or more. And yet, on weekday mornings in Tiananmen Square, thousands of people from across the country stand in line to catch a glimpse of the Great Helmsman inside his crystal sarcophagus. Given the havoc Mao wrought, it would be easy to assume that all those tourists are simply checking to make sure he's still dead.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | June 17, 2013
"Why are there no libertarian countries?" In a much-discussed essay for Salon magazine, Michael Lind asks: "If libertarians are correct in claiming that they understand how best to organize a modern society, how is it that not a single country in the world in the early twenty-first century is organized along libertarian lines?" Such is the philosophical poverty of liberalism today that this stands as a profound question. Definitions vary, but broadly speaking, libertarianism is the idea that people should be as free as possible from state coercion so long as they don't harm anyone.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | August 2, 1991
BEIJING -- Every nook and cranny of Chen Zhengfan's tiny two-room house down a twisting alleyway in the eastern part of this city is chock-full of artifacts reflecting Mao Tse-tung's life.Every cupboard, bookcase, drawer and suitcase opens to reveal the fruits of a more than three-decade-long obsession: hundreds of posters dating to the 1950s, buttons and bookmarks from the Great Cultural Revolution in the 1960s and 1970s, paper-cuts and poems, statues and photos of the Great Helmsman -- even copies of Mao's calligraphy.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | December 23, 1993
BEIJING -- There have been no reports of cackling coming from the transparent casket in Mao Tse-tung's huge mausoleum in Tiananmen Square. But somehow "The Great Helmsman" must be laughing.With the approach of the 100th anniversary of his birth Sunday, the predictable hoopla is on.Communist Party boss Jiang Zemin -- a lackluster figure who couldn't hold a candle to the late chairman -- made a pilgrimage this week to Mao's hometown to unveil a new statue of the late leader.Researchers are turning out mounds of new treatises on Mao. The state press is rife with articles about almost anyone who crossed his path, even an elevator operator who served him.But don't be misled: More than 17 years after his death at 82 -- or 83, by the Chinese way of figuring age -- Mao and his failed vision of radical collectivism have become irrelevant here.
FEATURES
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | November 1, 1993
Jung Chang sees herself as the fabled child who voices the unspeakable truth that the emperor has no clothes.Ms. Chang, who left China in 1978 and now lives in London,believes that was one effect of her first book. And she says she'll play that role again with her next work.Her first book -- the widely acclaimed "Wild Swans," published in 1991 and recently released in paperback -- introduced many Western readers to the horrific details of China's 1966-76 Cultural Revolution by matter-of-factly recounting her own family's sad history.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 16, 1998
NANJIE, China -- If Walt Disney's Epcot Center ever adds a "Mao World," it will probably look a lot like Nanjie, a surrealistic village where people live in identical apartments with the same ,, blond-wood coffee tables and 21-inch-screen TVs.The villagers, who work in collectively owned factories, begin their mornings singing socialist songs, earn a paltry $7.50 for a seven-day work week and are forbidden to dance or hold hands in public.Sound like hell? Li Guobing doesn't think so."I like the town," says Li, a 24-year-old salesman, who misses the paternalism and stability of China's old socialist system and cheerfully sings a few bars of the Cultural Revolution anthem, "The East is Red," upon request.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 8, 2003
BEIJING - A one-time secretary to Mao Tse-tung has published a sweeping call for political change in a Beijing magazine, warning that China must embrace democratic politics and free speech to avoid stagnation and possible collapse. "Only with democratization can there be modernization," the retired official, Li Rui, said. "This has been a global tide since the 20th century, especially the Second World War, and those who join it will prosper while those who resist will perish." Li, 85, a longtime advocate of faster political liberalization, has been held at arm's length by party leaders.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | February 20, 2000
This is an era of memoir hell. The cause for all these awful books is manifold: self-indulgence; the victimization fad; the celebration of trivial bathos practiced shamelessly by Oprah Winfrey, Jerry Springer and their imitators; general dumbing down; the decline in the quality of editing in U.S. publishing houses. It is a moment of particular joy, then, when one discovers a personal story that is crafted with dignity and literary skill. It is with such joy that I greet "Colors of the Mountain" by Da Chen (Random House, 310 pages, $25)
TRAVEL
By Susan Spano and Susan Spano,Los Angeles Times | May 11, 2008
SHAOSHAN, China // Like visitors at George Washington's estate in Mount Vernon, Va., people come to Shaoshan village deep in the heart of China to remember and teach their children about their national hero. He launched the Long March, an estimated 3,750-mile epic exploit as central to the story of China as the Boston Tea Party is to America. He fought warlords, the Japanese and the U.S.-supported Nationalists under Chiang Kai-shek. On Oct. 1, 1949, he stood in Beijing's Tiananmen Square and proclaimed the birth of a new China.
NEWS
By Rick Maese and Rick Maese,Sun reporter | October 28, 2007
Cal Ripken Jr. has developed a lucrative, baseball-centered career that includes stints as a television analyst, co-owner of a minor league team and a long list of other business interests since retiring from the Baltimore Orioles in 2002. But when he boards a plane at Washington Dulles International Airport today for his latest venture, he'll be carrying a batch of newly printed business cards. On one side of the small card his name appears in English, and on the back is a series of Chinese characters - an important tool for the newly appointed special envoy for the U.S. Department of State.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | August 24, 2007
PARIS -- Washington and the European capitals are all preoccupied with China's economic growth and expanding international influence and activities, taken as evidence that in the not-too-distant future China will become a superpower. Washington thinks about China's becoming a military as well as economic superpower. The Europeans think about trade and economic competition. Both underestimate what it takes to become a modern industrial superpower. It requires a very high level of autonomous technological capacity, to begin with, as well as sophisticated and innovative industry to make use of it - both of which China today lacks.
NEWS
By Gary Hogan | August 29, 2005
SHORTLY AFTER seizing power in 1949, China's Chairman Mao Tse-tung had a plan: He considered mobilizing all comrades in the new communist state to kill a daily quota of flies and mosquitoes in an attempt to reduce insect-borne disease among his mainly peasant masses. He did. They did. And it worked. The 1950s "Four Pests" campaign was one of many launched by the Great Helmsman in nearly 30 years as supreme leader of the People's Republic of China. Some were successful; the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution were disastrous.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 21, 2004
BEIJING - Behind the choreographed withdrawal of Jiang Zemin from China's central leadership Sunday was the government's attempt to display a maturing Communist Party completing its first orderly transfer of power. By voluntarily handing control of the military, to President Hu Jintao, Jiang may have signaled the end of an era. But the behind-the-scenes maneuvering that preceded Jiang's departure from his last major post illustrated something much different: a political system still trapped in the opaque, Kremlin-style intriguing of a bygone era. The Communist Party of China is building a bureaucracy to run the country and writing rules by which to govern it, but all the key decisions continue to be made behind an impenetrable shroud.
NEWS
February 7, 2004
Zang Kejia, 99, Chinese poet and writer who edited a famous volume of poems by Mao Tse-tung, died Thursday, the official Xinhua news agency said, quoting the Chinese Writers Association. Mr. Zang published his first collection of poems, titled Brand, in 1937, and a collection of ironic political verses in 1946. After the Communist Party assumed power in 1949, he teamed with writer Zhou Zhenfu to edit the chairman's volume, Selected Poems of Chairman Mao. Born in the eastern Chinese province of Shandong, Mr. Zang was trained at the Wuhan Branch of the Central Military and Political School.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chicago Tribune | July 6, 2003
Apple CEO Steve Jobs and Ben and Jerry of super-fattening-ice-cream fame weren't the first guerrilla marketers, insists author Gabriel Stricker. As he puts it, "Mao -- the original 'Chairman' of the board -- beat you to the punch years ago." So what if Communist Party chairman Mao Tse-tung, the former head of China, wasn't a capitalist at heart? He knew how to win battles as an underdog, Stricker writes. In his new book, Mao in the Boardroom (St. Martin's Press, $14.95), out this past week, Stricker lays out Mao's theories, then describes how capitalist warriors apply them on the corporate battlefield today.
NEWS
October 1, 1999
TODAY is the 50th anniversary of the moment when the revolutionary Mao Tse-tung climbed atop the gate of Beijing's Forbidden City and proclaimed the People's Republic of China. War preceded and tumult followed.He was the worst of Communists, embodying world revolution when Josef Stalin was rhetorically more restrained. He was the greatest of liberators, unchaining a giant from feudal slumber.He was the madman who proclaimed a great leap forward on sheer willpower that broke the nation. Where class, age and education were venerated, he was the paranoid who sicced teen-agers on parents and peasants on gentility, to destroy the social order and national genius.
NEWS
December 26, 2003
TODAY, CHINESE officialdom will unleash a notable degree of fanfare to commemorate the 110th anniversary of the birth of Mao Tse-tung, the founder of modern China and for a quarter-century its omnipotent Helmsman. In honor of Mao -- whose corpse still is on view in a mausoleum in the symbolic heart of China, Tiananmen Square -- a new symphony has been composed from that old Communist standby, "The East Is Red." And there's a flurry of Mao books, art, stamps, TV shows and even rap recordings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chicago Tribune | July 6, 2003
Apple CEO Steve Jobs and Ben and Jerry of super-fattening-ice-cream fame weren't the first guerrilla marketers, insists author Gabriel Stricker. As he puts it, "Mao -- the original 'Chairman' of the board -- beat you to the punch years ago." So what if Communist Party chairman Mao Tse-tung, the former head of China, wasn't a capitalist at heart? He knew how to win battles as an underdog, Stricker writes. In his new book, Mao in the Boardroom (St. Martin's Press, $14.95), out this past week, Stricker lays out Mao's theories, then describes how capitalist warriors apply them on the corporate battlefield today.
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