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By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2013
If you've got any Edgar Allan Poe manuscripts lying around, this may be a good time to sell them. A copy of Poe's poem "The Conqueror Worm," hand-written and signed by the author, sold for $300,000 Saturday -- about $280,000 more than the New England auction house handling it had expected. The yellowed document was purchased by an anonymous collector, SouthCoastToday.com reports, who has 10 days to verify its authenticity before the sale is final. It had been owned by a Rhode Island family since 1920, and was offered for auction by Marion Antique Auctions in Marion, Mass.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
In the spring of 1981, when Marion Rodgers was a senior at Goucher College, she nearly fell on top of a box of old papers that would change her life. Rodgers was preparing an article for the student newspaper paper on a former author and Goucher professor named Sara Haardt - who later married the iconoclastic journalist H.L. Mencken. "I was putting away one of her scrapbooks in the vault of the library's rare book room when I literally stumbled over a box that was lying on the floor next to a shelf," said Rodgers, now a resident of Washington, D.C. "Taped on the top of the box was a message that basically said, 'Do not open until 1981.
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
A handwritten draft of one of Edgar Allan Poe's earliest poems and a letter to author Washington Irving are among a handful of items that will be part of an exhibit opening April 26 at a Richmond, Va., museum devoted to the writer. "This is the kind of exhibit that comes around only once in a generation," Chris Semtner, curator of Richmond's Edgar Allan Poe Museum, said of "From Poe's Quill: The Letters and Manuscripts of Edgar Allan Poe," which will run through July 11. "Because Poe's manuscripts were not highly valued during his brief life, many have been lost or dispersed over time, making them very rare today.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Print is another country, and from the time we first discover the correspondences between the world of the senses and the shapes of letters, we explore a parallel landscape.  Speech we begin to learn before we can even walk, but reading and writing take years of application. It used to be even harder, as Keith Houston describes in Shady Characters: The Secret Life of Punctuation, Symbols & Other Typographical Marks  (W.W. Norton, 340 pages, $25.95):  "The orthographic world of ancient Greece was a sparse old place.
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By Michael Kenney and Michael Kenney,BOSTON GLOBE | May 1, 1996
The manuscript of an unpublished novel by Louisa May Alcott has been discovered at a Harvard University library and has aroused keen interest from book publishers and movie producers, sight unseen.The newly discovered novel, titled "The Inheritance" and believed to be Alcott's first novel, was written in 1849 when she was only 18. It is the second Alcott manuscript to surface in the last two years; in 1994, "A Long Fatal Love Chase" was purchased by Random House for a reported $1.5 million and had a good run on best-seller lists last fall.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 2, 2000
"The Saragossa Manuscript" was a favorite of Jerry Garcia and Luis Bunuel, and why not? Wojciech Has' 1965 film is a hallucinatory trip into history, the sub-conscious and narrative itself. Zbigniew Cybulski stars as a Napoleonic soldier who spies a book of drawings and is drawn into a series of ever-unfolding dream-stories worthy of Scheherazade. Garcia gave the Pacific Film Archives some money to find a complete print of the 180-minute movie, and the process of finding one ended the day before he died.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | April 1, 1992
At the beginning of "Manuscript Illumination in Flanders" at the Walters Art Gallery is a painting of a crucifixion in a Psalter of about 1300. Christ is shown on the cross between the Virgin Mary and John the Evangelist, on a flat gold background with both the sun and the moon above. The event is rendered in an almost abstract, symbolic way, with no attempt to create a setting from the real world for it.Toward the end of the same show is a depiction of the flight into Egypt from a book of hours of about 1510-1520, probably from Bruges.
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,Special to The Sun | January 29, 1995
Not counting restaurants, my favorite room in Baltimore is on the top floor of the downtown branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library. It doesn't look like much from the outside -- just a nondescript blue metal door with "Mencken Room" painted on it -- but I love it anyway. The Mencken Room is the place where I unearthed the long-forgotten manuscript of an unpublished book America's greatest journalist.On the inside, the Mencken Room looks like the library of a slightly seedy men's club: book-lined walls, aging chandeliers, reasonably comfortable chairs.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 13, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Federal law enforcement officials said yesterday that agents searching Theodore J. Kaczynski's Montana cabin had found the original typewritten manuscript of the Unabomber's 35,000-word manifesto, a powerful piece of evidence that has convinced the authorities that they have the long-sought serial terrorist.Elated officials said the recent discovery of the manuscript in the cabin capped a week-long search of the remote mountain cabin, in Lincoln, Mont., that has so far yielded a trove of physical evidence that prosecutors hope will provide them with an incontrovertible case against Mr. Kaczynski.
NEWS
By Herbert Mitgang and Herbert Mitgang,New York Times News Service HC | April 26, 1992
In December 1860, more than four years before John Wilkes Booth assassinated Abraham Lincoln in Ford's Theater in Washington, the actor wrote a 21-page manuscript that showed his fanatical state of mind, his sympathies for the Southern secessionists, and his association with the historical characters he portrayed in Shakespeare's plays.In the view of Lincoln scholars, had these sentiments been known to the officials responsible for guarding the president, it is possible that Booth would not have had such easy access to the theater on April 14, 1865.
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Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
Some things just naturally go together, like peanut butter and jelly. This summer, Francis Scott Key's original manuscript for "The Star-Spangled Banner" - America's national anthem - will be reunited for the first time with the flag that inspired it. "The National Museum of American History is proud to be the home of the iconic Star-Spangled Banner, the flag that inspired Francis Scott Key in 1814 to write passionate lyrics after the relentless...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
Henry Walters and J.P. Morgan were frenemies. Both were the sons of powerful fathers. They didn't come into their own until they reached middle age, when they were widely acknowledged as two of the premier financiers of the Gilded Age. Both displayed an inclination toward collecting art as children. As grown-ups, the two titans competed over who would acquire the next painting or objet d'art. So it's only fitting that portions of a 2,000-year-old Egyptian papyrus known as "The Book of the Faiyum" belonging to institutions founded by each mogul are being displayed for the first time in 150 years in a new exhibit opening Sunday at the Walters Art Museum . "There was this kind of early-20th-century friendly rivalry between J.P. Morgan and Henry Walters," says Julia Marciari-Alexander," the director of the Baltimore museum.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2013
If you've got any Edgar Allan Poe manuscripts lying around, this may be a good time to sell them. A copy of Poe's poem "The Conqueror Worm," hand-written and signed by the author, sold for $300,000 Saturday -- about $280,000 more than the New England auction house handling it had expected. The yellowed document was purchased by an anonymous collector, SouthCoastToday.com reports, who has 10 days to verify its authenticity before the sale is final. It had been owned by a Rhode Island family since 1920, and was offered for auction by Marion Antique Auctions in Marion, Mass.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2013
The Walters Art Museum, a trail-blazer in digitizing its collection and making it available online, has reached an agreement with Stanford University Libraries to give more than 100,000 high-res images of medieval manuscripts what is being called "a second home" in the Stanford Digital Repository. There, the images will receive "long-term protection against file loss or corruption," according to a statement released Thursday by Stanford. Also provided in the arrangement will be "digital handling tools that allow scholars to analyze the manuscripts and compare them with manuscripts elsewhere.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2012
The linguist Charles Carpenter Fries strove to show how far classroom English diverged from what is actually standard English, both in speech and writing. In The Story of Ain't   (reviewed yesterday) , David Skinner describes how Fries set out to establish this through empirical evidence, a corpus study of three thousand letters written to the U.S. government by ordinary citizens. He developed this analysis in a book, American English Grammar , demonstrating that "the actual difference in underlying grammar between vulgar and standard was, in reality, quite small.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
A handwritten draft of one of Edgar Allan Poe's earliest poems and a letter to author Washington Irving are among a handful of items that will be part of an exhibit opening April 26 at a Richmond, Va., museum devoted to the writer. "This is the kind of exhibit that comes around only once in a generation," Chris Semtner, curator of Richmond's Edgar Allan Poe Museum, said of "From Poe's Quill: The Letters and Manuscripts of Edgar Allan Poe," which will run through July 11. "Because Poe's manuscripts were not highly valued during his brief life, many have been lost or dispersed over time, making them very rare today.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 14, 1991
HOLLYWOOD -- A priceless "Huckleberry Finn" manuscript discovered stashed away in a librarian's attic here appears destined for the Buffalo public library in New York to which Mark Twain first donated it more than a century ago.Sotheby's of New York, in formally announcing the rare find yesterday, said that there were no plans to auction the manuscript, and the Hollywood librarian who made the discovery said that she probably would return the handwritten papers...
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1995
The sun came out midway through the card and dried out the track, changing the surface rating from muddy to fast.Oliver's Twist had command for more than a mile, running easily on the lead with a leisurely pace.But the Preakness runner-up couldn't fight off the late charge of My Manuscript, who overtook him in the final 16th of a mile to win the $100,000 Governor's Cup by 3 1/4 lengths at Laurel Park yesterday.There were no excuses for Oliver's Twist, the 1-2 favorite who was making his third start after being eased in the Ohio Derby on June 17."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
Baltimore's Walters Art Museum has received a $265,000 National Endowment for the Humanities grant to put toward digitizing its collection of medieval manuscripts and making it available, via computer, to the general public. The three-year project, "Imaging the Hours: Creating a Digital Resource of Flemish Manuscripts," includes 113 illustrated manuscripts, encompassing 45,000 pages of text with over 3,000 pages of illumination — elaborate illustrations, such as stylized letters or border decorations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2011
Twelve years ago, Walters Art Museum curator Will Noel opened a parcel and discovered what he calls "Archimedes' brain in a box. " Thus began a search for buried treasure — in this case, the lost writings of Archimedes of Syracuse, a famed Greek mathematician and inventor who lived in the third century B.C. Noel and his boss, museum director Gary Vikan, found a 174-page book made of cured goatskin that was ugly beyond belief. The sheaves were singed around the edges, the text and pages were defaced by water stains, and mold had eaten away entire sections.
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