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Manufacturing Jobs

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NEWS
April 18, 2011
The Sun article by Jamie Smith Hopkins on unemployment ("Mismatch between jobs and seekers," April 17) was excellent. However, the decline in manufacturing was an area that was not emphasized enough as a cause of unemployment in Maryland and the United States. Students graduating from Maryland high schools that are not college bound have no place to turn to for good paying unskilled jobs. The steel industry barely exists. There are no shipbuilding jobs available, and there are no clothing manufacturing jobs around either.
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BUSINESS
By Luke Broadwater and Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
After decades of manufacturing decline in Baltimore, city officials say they believe industry is poised to bounce back — and they want to promote a new education track in city schools to train students for the field. The Computer Numerical Control Manufacturing program, being offered this year at Carver Vocational-Technical High School, will train high school students for hard-to-fill skilled machinist jobs. Despite years of job losses, more than 12,000 people worked at more than 440 manufacturing companies last year in Baltimore.
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NEWS
February 14, 2014
Regarding your article on the relocation of Sun Products Corp., you state that Baltimore "has lost two-thirds of its manufacturing jobs in the last 20 years" ( "Sun Products to close Baltimore manufacturing plant," Feb. 11). I couldn't help but notice who was running the city then. First it was former Mayor Martin O'Malley, who served a couple of terms on his way to The White house, then his sidekick, Sheila "I need some gift cards" Dixon, until she got convicted. Which brings us to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, who seems more concerned with the murder rate than our economic state.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
Helping manufacturers in Maryland, where the sector has changed - and shrunk - dramatically in the last generation, takes a certain type of person. Like Brian Sweeney, an engineer and attorney who grew up in a factory. Sweeney is executive director of the Maryland Manufacturing Extension Partnership. The Columbia nonprofit works with small and medium-sized makers of goods in the state to identify problems and opportunities and is among the groups that launched a Make it in Maryland campaign last week.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
The molten metal pouring from the foundry at Danko Arlington Inc. in Baltimore harks back to the early industrial era. But across the street in one of the company's other buildings, workers operate an X-ray machine, a laser probe and a 3D printer that seems plucked straight from science fiction. "We're trying to do pioneering things here," said John D. Danko, whose grandfather started the company 92 years ago. He's not alone. A new study suggests that manufacturers in the Baltimore region are disproportionately high-tech - and calls on leaders to build on local strengths, rather than writing the long-shrinking sector off as a dying field.
BUSINESS
By Luke Broadwater and Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
After decades of manufacturing decline in Baltimore, city officials say they believe industry is poised to bounce back — and they want to promote a new education track in city schools to train students for the field. The Computer Numerical Control Manufacturing program, being offered this year at Carver Vocational-Technical High School, will train high school students for hard-to-fill skilled machinist jobs. Despite years of job losses, more than 12,000 people worked at more than 440 manufacturing companies last year in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Gubernatorial candidate Douglas Gansler unveiled his jobs plan Thursday with a focus on bringing back manufacturing jobs, establishing a portal were academics and business workers can exchange ideas and offering incentives for small business owners to create jobs. "It's a plan built around one core truth: Maryland needs more jobs, entry-level jobs, mid-level jobs, high-tech jobs, construction jobs, engineering jobs - you name it, Maryland needs it," said Gansler, the state's Democratic attorney general.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Mark Guidera and Ian Johnson and Mark Guidera,Staff Writers Staff writer Kim Clark contributed to this article | October 17, 1993
When Wall Street economists confidently predict that the nation's economy will grow quickly next year, and when they tout the rise in Americans' income, they inevitably overlook people like John Krieger.The Annapolis engineer lost his $75,000-a-year job last spring at Digital Equipment Corp., where he had worked for eight years in computer operations and marketing. Just a few years ago, he could afford a $12,000 sailboat; these days, he's collecting $223 weekly unemployment insurance checks.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1998
Aluminum products maker Alcore Inc. intends to consolidate its headquarters and manufacturing operations in Harford County and hire about 120 new employees by early next year, a move that will nearly double its work force.Just as importantly, the company's planned June move represents the first significant step in a drive to expand Harford's manufacturing employment base, after years of landing some of Maryland's largest distribution centers."Alcore enhances the county's reputation as a place for manufacturers to be," said Paul Gilbert, director of the county's economic development office.
NEWS
December 22, 2000
CHRISTMAS CAME early in far Western Maryland. A remote mountain region hit by decades of plant closings soon will be home to a manufacturing plant that could employ 800 people. The proposed ClosetMaid plant in Grantsville marks a stunning turnaround for Garrett and Allegany counties, which worked closely with state officials to close this deal. The number of plant jobs is higher than the number of residents on unemployment in Garrett, Maryland's westernmost county. There's more good news.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Gubernatorial candidate Douglas Gansler unveiled his jobs plan Thursday with a focus on bringing back manufacturing jobs, establishing a portal were academics and business workers can exchange ideas and offering incentives for small business owners to create jobs. "It's a plan built around one core truth: Maryland needs more jobs, entry-level jobs, mid-level jobs, high-tech jobs, construction jobs, engineering jobs - you name it, Maryland needs it," said Gansler, the state's Democratic attorney general.
NEWS
February 20, 2014
The debate over the minimum wage, both in Maryland and nationally, and related concerns over income inequality have provoked some unpleasant and ongoing side effects. The recent trend of billionaires flaunting their perceived superiority over the less-economically-well-endowed while simultaneously decrying "class warfare" and even invoking a comparison to Nazi persecution being among the worst. Yet the very parameters of the conversation seem flawed. Many people assume, for instance, that raising the standard of living for the working class necessarily takes away from those on the highest rung of the ladder.
NEWS
February 14, 2014
Regarding your article on the relocation of Sun Products Corp., you state that Baltimore "has lost two-thirds of its manufacturing jobs in the last 20 years" ( "Sun Products to close Baltimore manufacturing plant," Feb. 11). I couldn't help but notice who was running the city then. First it was former Mayor Martin O'Malley, who served a couple of terms on his way to The White house, then his sidekick, Sheila "I need some gift cards" Dixon, until she got convicted. Which brings us to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, who seems more concerned with the murder rate than our economic state.
NEWS
December 28, 2013
Small business owners on the Eastern Shore, especially Ocean City , may not be able to afford to pay an employee more than $8.25 per hour. And we are not alone; many small towns in Maryland have Mom and Pop businesses. In Ocean City , we have a four-month season, and after that business owners are forced to live off our savings and meager profit from the summer. Many businesses here close after Oct. 1 and have a zero revenue stream until April. Many people that live here year-round are placed on unemployment in the winter.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2013
The General Motors factory in Baltimore, the Solo Cup plant in Owings Mills and the steel mill at Sparrows Point all made things for decades. And all closed in the past 10 years. It's a familiar tale for much of the country. But Maryland's manufacturing job losses - the result of cutbacks, shutdowns and technological innovations requiring fewer people - are among the nation's steepest. The state saw a faster pace of job reductions in the sector than all but seven other states and the District of Columbia in the past six years, according to a Baltimore Sun analysis comparing the most recent Labor Department figures with the period just before the recession.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2013
HAGERSTOWN — Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler brought his all-but-official campaign for governor to Western Maryland on Friday, pledging to help rebuild the state's manufacturing base by giving Maryland companies preference in securing government contracts. Gansler, speaking at a United Auto Workers union hall near Hagerstown's Mack Truck/Volvo plant, laid out a seven-point plan to increase the manufacturing sector, which he said now ranks 43rd in the nation. The most significant of those steps would be a reversal of Maryland's decades-old policy of letting in-state and out-of-state companies compete on an equal basis for billions of dollars annually in state contracts.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2013
President Barack Obama will visit Baltimore next Friday, the second in a series of outings aimed at selling his stalled jobs agenda. The trip follows one the president took this week to Austin, Texas, where he visited a school and a manufacturing plant. An administration official said it was too early to say where, specifically, the president's Maryland events will take place. The White House has been working to refocus attention on manufacturing jobs at a time when much of Washington is more consumed by the debates on immigration and the federal budget.
NEWS
March 1, 2013
As one of Maryland's manufacturing companies, we enthusiastically support The Sun's position on the offshore wind legislation now before the state Senate ("Wind picks up steam," Feb. 25). The Sun's position provides a realistic description of the balance between commercial investment uncertainties and the very large potential to create jobs, new manufacturing and renewable sources of energy. The state's role in offshore wind energy is as a catalyst for commercial investment. There is no assurance that such investment will occur in Maryland, but without the state's forward-looking strategy, the manufacturing jobs associated with offshore wind are likely to be captured by other states.
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