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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
The number of concertos for guitar and orchestra is not long; the list of those heard regularly in concert halls is shorter still. This week, a Baltimore-rooted guitar concerto will enter the repertoire and, given the considerable assets behind it, should have a good chance of becoming one of the more successful works of its kind. Jonathan Leshnoff, a rising figure in the contemporary music world and a Towson University faculty member, is the composer. He has written the concerto for and dedicated it to prominent classical guitarist and longtime Peabody Conservatory faculty member Manuel Barrueco, who will be the soloist for the premiere, backed by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and music director Marin Alsop.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
The number of concertos for guitar and orchestra is not long; the list of those heard regularly in concert halls is shorter still. This week, a Baltimore-rooted guitar concerto will enter the repertoire and, given the considerable assets behind it, should have a good chance of becoming one of the more successful works of its kind. Jonathan Leshnoff, a rising figure in the contemporary music world and a Towson University faculty member, is the composer. He has written the concerto for and dedicated it to prominent classical guitarist and longtime Peabody Conservatory faculty member Manuel Barrueco, who will be the soloist for the premiere, backed by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and music director Marin Alsop.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | September 30, 1993
That Manuel Barrueco is a remarkable musician was apparent from the beginning of the guitar recital he gave last night in Friedberg Hall.Anyone who can play the slow opening allemande of Silvius Weiss' Suite in D minor and sustain it with so gripping a sense of inevitability demands attention and respect.Anyone who can make this music, which was written for the lute and which was played in what was presumably the guitarist's own arrangement, sound like great music deserves even more.Weiss, an almost exact contemporary of J. S. Bach and probably the greatest lutentist of the Baroque period, was no Bach.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
When Peabody Institute professor Manuel Barrueco received an email alerting him that he had been nominated for a prestigious fellowship carrying a five-figure cash prize, he assumed it was spam, perhaps a variation of the Nigerian lottery scam, and deleted it. When Barrueco received several follow-up emails in the ensuing weeks, he also sent them unread to his computer's trash bin. It took a phone call and the blunt question, "What are you doing?"...
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 1, 2004
In a world filled with the loud and the blatant, the classical guitar - a plug-free, not unplugged instrument - offers a rare, inviting balm. And when Manuel Barrueco's hands are at work, the guitar speaks volumes, without ever having to raise its voice. There wasn't any doubt that Barrueco had talent when he entered the Peabody Institute to study guitar in the early 1970s. The extent of that talent, though, came as a surprise. "We knew by his second year that this was a kind of player we had never seen before," says Ray Chester, head of Peabody's guitar department.
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By Larry Harris and Larry Harris,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1995
The ever-rising spiral of Manuel Barrueco's career reached a high point recently when the Cuban-born classical guitarist entered a London studio to begin work on a CD with tenor Placido Domingo.On this occasion, Mr. Domingo was doing more than singing. Having recently expanded his horizons as a conductor, Mr. Domingo was leading the London Philharmonia as Mr. Barrueco performed the soulful "Concierto de Aranjuez" by Joaquin Rodrigo.The two struck an instant camaraderie, and Mr. Domingo insisted on changing plans for the rest of the disk.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 11, 2000
I feel that variety is the spice of life." At the moment, classical guitarist Manuel Barrueco is talking about his recital at Shriver Hall tomorrow evening, a program that will include works by Bach, Spanish composer Joaquin Rodrigo and the contemporary American composer Lou Harrison. But he may as well be speaking of his artistic life in general, because Barrueco's musical career is nothing if not varied. For half the year, the Cuban-born guitarist is in Baltimore, where he lives and teaches at the Peabody Conservatory; for the other half, he's on the road, giving performances or making recordings.
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By Larry Harris and Larry Harris,Special to the Sun | April 4, 1999
Going to a party at Manuel Barrueco's spacious, comfortable home in Lutherville is much like attending a session of the United Nations.On one side of the room three young Asian men, obviously students, are in deep, subdued conversation.A beautiful Russian girl from Siberia, with hints of the steppes in her cheekbones, enters, laughing along with her escort.In a corner, a Spanish composer, his arms flapping wildly, talks animatedly with an assistant conductor of the BSO. Down the hall a young Indian girl has a tug of war with the energetic beagle of the house, Heidi.
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By Stephen Wigler | February 20, 1997
A goodly number of the world's classical guitar aficionados argues that Manuel Barrueco is the greatest living master of the instrument -- and, certainly, no one is greater.The Cuban-American virtuoso makes one of his rare appearances this Saturday at the Peabody Institute in a program of Bach, Schubert, Angulo, Rodrigo and Falla that no guitar fancier will want to miss.Manuel Barrueco's recital takes place Saturday evening at 8 p.min Friedberg Concert Hall (1 E. Mount Vernon Place). Tickets are $20; $15 for Baltimore Classical Guitar Society and Walters Art Gallery members; and $12 for students with ID. For tickets or for more information, call (410)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jarrett Graver | November 13, 1997
Classical guitarist Manuel Barrueco and the Colorado String Quartet bring their elegantly refined playing styles to a Candlelight Concert at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre on Saturday. Barrueco, a faculty member of the Peabody Conservatory of Music, has a comprehensive repertoire that runs from Mozart to McCartney, and has worked with such renowned artists as Placido Domingo and the London Philharmonic Orchestra. The Colorado String Quartet has been lauded on four continents since winning first prize at the prestigious Banff International String Quartet Competition in 1983.
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By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,tim.smith@baltsun.com | February 12, 2009
Two of the Peabody Conservatory's finest faculty artists - Manuel Barrueco and Gary Louie - are featured on recent CDs worth seeking out. Barrueco, the eminent classical guitarist, explores a sampling of arresting works for guitar and string quartet from the past two decades on a collection called Sounds of America, released by the Baltimore-based, Barrueco-centered Tonar Music label. "Bay of Pigs," Michael Daugherty's "elegy for Cuba, past and present," opens with three guitar notes that evoke Joaquin Rodrigo's famous "Concierto de Aranjuez," drawing the listener into a moody, but very colorful, world.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 1, 2004
In a world filled with the loud and the blatant, the classical guitar - a plug-free, not unplugged instrument - offers a rare, inviting balm. And when Manuel Barrueco's hands are at work, the guitar speaks volumes, without ever having to raise its voice. There wasn't any doubt that Barrueco had talent when he entered the Peabody Institute to study guitar in the early 1970s. The extent of that talent, though, came as a surprise. "We knew by his second year that this was a kind of player we had never seen before," says Ray Chester, head of Peabody's guitar department.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | February 24, 2002
There's an unmistakable Russian tint to the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's 2002-2003 season -- 17 works by 11 Russian composers. But that's only part of the picture. Also providing color is a welcome sampling of pieces by contemporary composers, along with works by rather infrequently encountered masters of the past (more than a dozen pieces will get their first BSO performances). Putting the finishing touches on the season, as usual, will be lots of meat-and-potatoes music. The lineup lacks the extra excitement that, say, a world premiere can provide, but it has distinct strengths.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 25, 2001
It's one of the oldest, subtlest, even sexiest of instruments. It has endured periods of public disinterest and has maintained its dignity while an electric version of it has hogged the spotlight. And, unlike that plugged-in model, no one ever cavorts crazily all over a stage while playing it, or smashes it after a performance. It's the classical guitar. And it's quite a survivor. "Some of the first truly great composers wrote for it," says Ray Chester, coordinator of the guitar department at Peabody Conservatory.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 4, 2000
Newly installed squeak-free seats and an exceptional variety of repertoire and artists will greet audiences for the Peabody Conservatory of Music's 2000-2001 concert season. The long-awaited seats, the first renovation of Peabody's Friedberg Concert Hall in 17 years, will not be the only novel sensation in store. The Baltimore premiere of Philip Glass' Double Concerto for Timpani and Orchestra (co-commissioned by the conservatory), a program of works by eminent British composer Nicholas Maw, and a production of Benjamin Britten's brilliant opera "A Midsummer Night's Dream" are among the season's highlights.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 11, 2000
I feel that variety is the spice of life." At the moment, classical guitarist Manuel Barrueco is talking about his recital at Shriver Hall tomorrow evening, a program that will include works by Bach, Spanish composer Joaquin Rodrigo and the contemporary American composer Lou Harrison. But he may as well be speaking of his artistic life in general, because Barrueco's musical career is nothing if not varied. For half the year, the Cuban-born guitarist is in Baltimore, where he lives and teaches at the Peabody Conservatory; for the other half, he's on the road, giving performances or making recordings.
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By Larry Harris and Larry Harris,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1996
"Angels' Glory"; Kathleen Battle and Christopher Parkening; Sony ClassicalWhen Christopher Parkening and soprano Kathleen Battle recorded a disc several years ago, it was hugely successful, and fTC follow-up was inevitable. This collection of Christmas songs, with a strong infusion of American spirituals, is a logical second offering and has much to recommend it. Throughout, Parkening provides a relaxed, laid-back accompaniment to the tempestuous Battle and indeed only takes one lengthy solo during the entire course of the disc.
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By Larry Harris and Larry Harris,Staff Writer | January 14, 1993
As one of the world's finest classical guitarists, Manuel Barrueco is quite accustomed to exotic ports of call. Faraway places with strange-sounding names are part of his everyday life.Forgive him, then, if he confesses to a twinge of home-turf nervousness as he prepares to guest solo with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra at the Meyerhoff.Even though the program -- Joaquin Rodrigo's Concierto de Aranjuez -- is a familiar one and no great challenge for an artist of Mr. Barrueco's magnitude, the native Cuban who now calls Baltimore home says he will be a bit edgy until actually beginning to play.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Larry Harris and Larry Harris,Special to the Sun | April 4, 1999
Going to a party at Manuel Barrueco's spacious, comfortable home in Lutherville is much like attending a session of the United Nations.On one side of the room three young Asian men, obviously students, are in deep, subdued conversation.A beautiful Russian girl from Siberia, with hints of the steppes in her cheekbones, enters, laughing along with her escort.In a corner, a Spanish composer, his arms flapping wildly, talks animatedly with an assistant conductor of the BSO. Down the hall a young Indian girl has a tug of war with the energetic beagle of the house, Heidi.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | September 17, 1998
BSO's 82nd seasonThe Baltimore Symphony Orchestra opens its 82nd concert season with the world premiere of Steven Stucky's Concerto Mediterraneo for Guitar and Orchestra at 8 p.m. today at Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. The program, featuring guitar soloist Manuel Barrueco (pictured) and guest conductor Gunther Herbig, also includes Beethoven's Egmont Overture and Symphony No. 3, "Eroica". The program will be repeated at 8 p.m. tomorrow and Saturday. A free pre-concert lecture starts at 7 p.m. tomorrow.
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