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BUSINESS
By Jane Applegate and Jane Applegate,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 23, 1991
When new or temporary employees arrive at Vector Inc., they often are puzzled about what the company does and what they && are supposed to do."Most people who come to work for us have never heard about what we do, which is provide vocational rehabilitation for injured workers and serve as expert witnesses," said Marcia Andersen, co-owner of the small Westminster, Calif., company.To eliminate confusion and save time, Andersen hired Linda Reitman, a consultant and technical writer, to develop a job manual describing exactly how Vector's front office operation should work.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
For six straight hours for four straight afternoons during one of the largest ship-hosting events in Baltimore history, all water traffic within a large rectangle in the middle of the harbor is being completely restricted by a cadre of law enforcement agencies. No tall ships, no personal watercraft, no dinghys. Period. Only the icebreaker A.V. Sandusky of the Maryland Natural Resources Police and the Coast Guard cutter James Rankin are allowed in the so-called box, and even they are not allowed to move.
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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2004
Steven Oken's final days were carefully scripted in a 32-page state manual with eight appendixes. The state prison system's Execution Operations Manual establishes precise a sequence, starting 14 days before the death sentence is to be carried out, when an execution team is to be selected, through the hours after death, when a funeral director is summoned. In the dry language of a government training handbook, the manual - DCM 110-2 - lists, for example, preferred characteristics for a member of the execution team: "Ability to maintain confidentiality," "good moral character" and "professional appearance."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2014
The author Mohsin Hamid has a home in Pakistan and spent nearly two decades studying and working in the United States. He's 42 now, and he thinks of himself as living almost "between" countries. "I've lived half my life in America and Europe, and half my life in Pakistan," Hamid says over the phone. He's coming to Baltimore this week, where he will read from his third novel, "How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia. " "But I also live between generations, and I live between social classes with different political points of view.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
For six straight hours for four straight afternoons during one of the largest ship-hosting events in Baltimore history, all water traffic within a large rectangle in the middle of the harbor is being completely restricted by a cadre of law enforcement agencies. No tall ships, no personal watercraft, no dinghys. Period. Only the icebreaker A.V. Sandusky of the Maryland Natural Resources Police and the Coast Guard cutter James Rankin are allowed in the so-called box, and even they are not allowed to move.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1998
Imagine a rabbi offering a prayer specifically composed to ease the jitters that come with sending your kid off to camp, or praying for the parents and safety of a teen-ager who's just been licensed to drive.Such are the suggestions of a new rabbi's manual for Conservative Judaism's 750 congregations in North America and elsewhere that includes dozens of new rites, including a "grieving ritual" for a couple after an abortion.Last revived more than three decades ago -- before women rabbis and cantors were ordained and families began confronting a new generation of issues the new manual was issued by the Rabbinical Assembly of Conservative Judaism in response to a plethora of life events.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | February 17, 1998
Stephen Dixon, the most prolific author in Baltimore, divides his 40 years of writing into three periods: The Olivetti Period. The Royal Period. The Hermes Period.He's not discussing literary matters, such as the changing styles of his fiction, known to some as experimental realism.He's talking more important things -- the gears of creation in different manual typewriters he has insisted on using to the exclusion of computers and electric and electronic typewriters.In this day of the commanding computer, he has company in other authors, letter-writers, retired people and notables, including Ralph Nader, who are wedded to manuals and shudder at electrically powered instruments that are a mite too comfortable.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith and Jamie Smith,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 28, 1997
Every day, without fail, Rose Bradley has to put up with questions about her job: Are you claustrophobic? Doesn't this make you feel sick? Don't you get bored?Then there's her favorite: "Do you get paid for this?" " 'No,' I say. 'I'm just doing this for my health,' " says the 29-year-old Northwest Baltimore resident.The reason so many people are curious about what Bradley does that she's an elevator operator, one of a handful in the city. Eight manual elevators remain in the metropolitan area, according to the state's Elevator Safety Inspections agency.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 23, 2000
WASHINGTON - Warning of a potential "constitutional crisis," Texas Gov. George W. Bush asked the U.S. Supreme Court yesterday to strike down manual recounts in Florida - clearing the way for Bush to win the presidency. "This is a case of the utmost national importance," lawyers for Bush argued in papers that took the dispute to the Supreme Court for the first time. "The outcome of the election for the presidency of the United States may hang in the balance." If the justices do not step in, his attorneys said, "the consequence may be the ascension of a president of questionable legitimacy or a constitutional crisis."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Sun Staff Writer | April 15, 1994
Grady Ward was pretty sure he had the real thing: An Employee Security Manual, stamped "official use only," from the National Security Agency.But he wasn't certain until the morning after he distributed the 21-page manual over Internet -- a global computer network with more than 16 million subscribers -- and the phone rang at his Arcata, Calif., home."Security Duty Officer No. 10," said the voice at the other end of the line."He asked me where I got it from. He grilled me," recalled Mr. Ward, 43, a computer software designer.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2011
Sometimes the best thing a columnist can do is make way for the good sense of others. This is one of those times. In this case, that common sense is provided by an unlikely source — the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration. Now the MVA does a lot of things wrong. Who of us has not griped about waiting in line at one of its offices? (To be fair, on my last visit, I was in and out with a replacement driver's license in 10 minutes.) But the MVA has a new version of its Maryland Drivers Manual out on the street, and the section on bicycles is clear and well-stated.
NEWS
By James Hohmann and James Hohmann,The Washington Post | August 19, 2009
Metrorail passengers frustrated with jerkier rides and longer waits for trains after June's Red Line crash can expect those irritations to continue indefinitely as operators run every train in the system manually. Metro does not have precise data on how much slower the system is moving, but spokeswoman Lisa Farbstein said trains controlled by operators tend to spend more time at station platforms and take extra time to accelerate than do trains run by computers. "You could lose a couple of minutes from one end [of a line]
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | June 2, 2007
I have been hearing voices. Sometimes they call out to me in the middle of the night. Mostly they bellow in the morning. They are familiar voices; they come from my pocket-size portable radio. Yet they startle me. The voices boom like intruders with perfect pitch, even though I have not turned the device on. Moreover, no matter how many buttons I push, I have great difficulty silencing the clamor. On a personal level, these radio eruptions are yet another instance of a guy struggling with a new gizmo.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | January 20, 2007
Rogue ice had formed on the floor of the refrigerator freezer, and I was getting frosted. This was the household's backup fridge, one that sits in the basement. It had been moved there when a new first-line fridge took up residence in the kitchen some months back. It had become known as the "beer fridge," the place where brews, brats and other vital components of basement life were stashed. The machine started acting up right before Christmas -- the fridge wasn't cooling properly, and ice was forming, then melting on the freezer floor.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun reporter | September 7, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Under the glare of world condemnation for abuse of U.S. detainees at Abu Ghraib and Guantanamo, the Pentagon ordered for the first time yesterday that all of its prisoners in the war on terrorism be treated humanely under international law. It took the highly unusual step of publishing on the Army Web site a new military interrogation manual that prohibits such practices as hooding, using electric shock, depriving detainees of sleep or...
NEWS
By TOM BOWMAN and TOM BOWMAN,SUN REPORTER | November 16, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The Pentagon is delaying the planned release this week of the Army's new interrogation manual, which calls for humane treatment of prisoners and specifically prohibits the kind of harsh tactics that came to light in the Abu Ghraib scandal, officials said yesterday. Two defense officials said that White House aides believe the manual, which was scheduled to be released tomorrow, is too vague about the precise interrogation methods that may be used. The manual, largely completed last spring, is designed to replace the current version, now 13 years old. The new instructions specifically bar such tactics as sleep deprivation, stripping prisoners and the use of dogs.
NEWS
By Larry Fish and Larry Fish,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 16, 2005
PHILADELPHIA - They lend charm and character to the roads of Lancaster County, Pa., but horse-drawn buggies and their operators may be more susceptible to roadway perils than other drivers. So for the first time, a distinctively attuned "Horse and Buggy Driver's Manual," which draws upon the Golden Rule as much as modern traffic laws, has been published for Amish and others who rely on the kind of horsepower that has hooves. The manual, prepared with assistance from the Lancaster County Planning Department and the state's police and Department of Transportation, is meant to help buggy drivers understand how to be safer on roads dominated by motor traffic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | November 19, 2000
"The Booklover's Repair Kit: First Aid for Home Libraries," by Estelle Ellis with Wilton Wiggins and Douglas Lee (Knopf, 117 page manual with tools, $125). A gift for a person with an aging but beloved library from an admirer who has nothing more important to do with $125, this is a deliciously elegant gesture. There is a beautifully designed and meticulously illustrated hardcover manual, with sections ranging from "Reattaching Loose Flyleaves, Pages, and Illustrations" to "Repairing Frayed Cover Edges" to "Why Books Need Cleaning."
NEWS
By SIOBHAN GORMAN AND TOM BOWMAN and SIOBHAN GORMAN AND TOM BOWMAN,SUN REPORTERS | November 3, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration should re-evaluate its long-term plan for detaining suspected terrorists in light of reports that the CIA has a secret prison system in Eastern Europe and elsewhere, members of Congress and current and former intelligence officials say. Details of the post-9/11 network of so-called "black sites" were first reported by The Washington Post and the locations confirmed by The Sun. The report raised questions about how...
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2005
For the man who loves to grill, Weber's Real Grilling (Sunset, 2005, $24.95) may be the perfect Father's Day gift. It's full of red meat, heavy on the how-tos without being offensive to the sophisticated, and mouthwatering just to look at. Author Jamie Purviance and photographer Tim Turner have created a book that covers all the basics of gas and charcoal cooking, and ventures far beyond. With more than 200 recipes, you'll find everything from straightforward burgers and brats to Tangerine Lobster Tails, T-Bone Steaks With Eggplant Caponata and Whole Roasted Turkey Breast With Sage and Prosciutto.
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