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NEWS
March 8, 2013
The Baltimore City Police are looking for a suspect in a brazen daytime murder witnessed by many, but no one is talking. In keeping with the urban street code where no one speaks for fear of retaliation, De'ontae Smith's murder the day of the Ravens downtown parade remains a mystery ("Police believe stabbing victim was downtown for parade" Feb. 6). The "stop snitching" mantra of urban youths is the code of the street. For fear of reprisals and harm, many urban crimes, such as murder, go unsolved.
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NEWS
March 8, 2013
The Baltimore City Police are looking for a suspect in a brazen daytime murder witnessed by many, but no one is talking. In keeping with the urban street code where no one speaks for fear of retaliation, De'ontae Smith's murder the day of the Ravens downtown parade remains a mystery ("Police believe stabbing victim was downtown for parade" Feb. 6). The "stop snitching" mantra of urban youths is the code of the street. For fear of reprisals and harm, many urban crimes, such as murder, go unsolved.
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EXPLORE
August 31, 2012
I would like to respond to "No amount of spin can explain Obama's abundant failures" (letter, Aug. 2). The letter states that the country is not better off than it was four years ago. Now, I know telling people that things are really, really bad and that it's all President Obama's fault is Fox News 101 mantra, but if you examine the facts, things are gradually getting better. If we can step into the "way-back" machine and return to the Fall of 2008, the economy was hemorrhaging jobs, financial institutions were reeling with bad debt, foreclosures were running in the millions.
EXPLORE
August 31, 2012
I would like to respond to "No amount of spin can explain Obama's abundant failures" (letter, Aug. 2). The letter states that the country is not better off than it was four years ago. Now, I know telling people that things are really, really bad and that it's all President Obama's fault is Fox News 101 mantra, but if you examine the facts, things are gradually getting better. If we can step into the "way-back" machine and return to the Fall of 2008, the economy was hemorrhaging jobs, financial institutions were reeling with bad debt, foreclosures were running in the millions.
NEWS
July 12, 2011
Loved the letter from Simon Moroney about Paul Hewson, aka Bono ("Cardin's affection for Bono foundation is indefensible," July 9). Bono should run for Congress or the U.S. Senate. He'd fit right in with the "do as I say, not as I do" crowd. D. Pazourek, Sparks
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | July 31, 1994
It has become a mantra. Ask a candidate what's on voters' minds and the answer always includes crime.Sara Engram is editorial-page director of The Evening Sun.
NEWS
September 30, 2001
"Our mantra for the year is: Every teacher is a teacher of reading. It's the only thing that's going to keep these kids in school and moving forward." Barbara Livermon, staff trainer with the Achievement First school reform program at Lombard Middle School in Baltimore, one of 10 low-performing schools singled out for improvement.
BUSINESS
By Stephen L. Rosenstein | December 23, 2007
Small business owners are not always the best employee motivators. Some are so wrapped up in operational issues that their people skills fall short. If your business already has employees or plans to hire them, these individuals will be critical to your success. You need to learn how to elicit good results from your employees without micromanaging every detail of their work. Most business owners delegate work to an employee, only to find a finished task that isn't what they envisioned.
NEWS
By Desonta Holder and By Desonta Holder,Knight Ridder / Tribune | November 14, 2004
Mia Glick is always encouraging her prenatal yoga class to "breathe, relax, open, let go." The class is for pregnant women, but spouses are invited, too, and the few who give it a try are amazed at how hard it can be to just breathe and let go. "I call out each part of their body and dramatically have them relax each part," Glick says. "And then once I get them to relax, I get them to relax even more. And once they relax even more, I get them to relax even more. It's like layers of an onion.
NEWS
By Daniel Collings | July 16, 2004
IT'S THE PERFECT photo. Sitting at President Bush's right hand, British Prime Minister Tony Blair grasped the president's hand firmly and looked at him with a forceful, closed-mouth smile, expressing in one gesture the resolve and unfailing support for which Mr. Blair is now famous. Taken at the recent NATO summit in Turkey, the photo captured the moment June 28 that the two leaders learned of the successful transfer of sovereignty to Iraq. Little wonder, given Mr. Blair's U.S. popularity, that the image took pride of place on the Bush-Cheney 2004 Web site.
FEATURES
May 30, 2012
By Bailey Shiffler Special to The Baltimore Sun A summer vacation implies relaxation, but it doesn't guarantee it. In the age of 24-hour connectivity, it's nearly impossible to clear the mind and give in to leisure. Even when lying on the sands of a tropical beach or on the deck of a cruise ship, it's tough not to think of emails piling up, the impending family reunion or the bills left to pay. Use these tips from relaxation experts — from an aesthetician to doctors and a yoga teacher — to make the most of your time away from work this summer.
NEWS
July 12, 2011
Loved the letter from Simon Moroney about Paul Hewson, aka Bono ("Cardin's affection for Bono foundation is indefensible," July 9). Bono should run for Congress or the U.S. Senate. He'd fit right in with the "do as I say, not as I do" crowd. D. Pazourek, Sparks
NEWS
June 28, 2010
Here's a stumper for your next current events quiz: Top leaders from what political party called for "full disclosure" of campaign contributions and expenditures as a "helpful move towards restoring confidence of voters"? Anyone who observed last week's 219-206 vote in favor of just such reforms might have assumed it was the Democrats, as members of that party cast all by two of the yea votes. But not so fast. The above phrases were lifted from the remarks made by House Minority Leader John Boehner and Minority Whip Eric Cantor.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | February 15, 2009
At Beehive Baltimore's still-spartan office in Canton, about a half-dozen intense people huddled recently at laptops, with cell phones, Coke cans and power cords scattered across tables. But they aren't employed by the same company; they're software developers, entrepreneurs and freelancers busy with their own projects - part of a trend called "co-working." All have one thing in common: They're tired of working from home alone. The Beehive was formed for independent workers "tired of talking to their dogs," says co-founder Dave Troy, a software developer who's been involved with the local technology scene for years.
BUSINESS
By Stephen L. Rosenstein | December 23, 2007
Small business owners are not always the best employee motivators. Some are so wrapped up in operational issues that their people skills fall short. If your business already has employees or plans to hire them, these individuals will be critical to your success. You need to learn how to elicit good results from your employees without micromanaging every detail of their work. Most business owners delegate work to an employee, only to find a finished task that isn't what they envisioned.
NEWS
January 13, 2007
Draft could corrode our resolve to fight What Lawrence J. Korb and others who advocate reinstating the draft fail to recognize is that emotions should have nothing to do with fighting wars ("Burden should be shared," Opinion Commentary, Jan. 9). Mr. Korb suggests that forcing 18-year-olds into the armed forces will cause families and friends of those forced into service to be so "emotionally involved" that they would advocate for an immediate cessation of violence. Mr. Korb paints this as a good thing.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2004
By the time Maryland's Democratic-controlled General Assembly wrapped up this year's legislative session, it had voted down a popular tax shelter, imposed a corporate income tax surcharge and approved a budget expected to quickly fall out of balance. And those were just three losses for the business lobby. There was blame to go around Annapolis. But to the business community, none of it would be pinned on Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., the first Republican in the seat in decades. Some quietly quibbled that he was stubborn and singularly focused on expanding gambling in Maryland, but for the most part, the business establishment saluted his performance.
FEATURES
May 30, 2012
By Bailey Shiffler Special to The Baltimore Sun A summer vacation implies relaxation, but it doesn't guarantee it. In the age of 24-hour connectivity, it's nearly impossible to clear the mind and give in to leisure. Even when lying on the sands of a tropical beach or on the deck of a cruise ship, it's tough not to think of emails piling up, the impending family reunion or the bills left to pay. Use these tips from relaxation experts — from an aesthetician to doctors and a yoga teacher — to make the most of your time away from work this summer.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Sun Reporter | December 12, 2006
Proving how complicated December can be in the NFL, one only has to look at the Ravens' predicament this week. Are the Ravens rooting for the Indianapolis Colts to beat the Cincinnati Bengals in order to wrap up the AFC North? Or are the Ravens hoping the Bengals knock off the Colts because it helps their cause for grabbing a top-two seed in the playoffs? Rather than attempt to clarify the playoff picture, the Ravens have a more simple formula: Just win their last three games. From experience, the Ravens know that it's the hottest teams - not the highest-seeded ones - that usually win the Super Bowl.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | September 27, 2005
WASHINGTON -- One can only imagine what was going on in Russian President Vladimir V. Putin's head as he watched President Bush explain to reporters how he was going to cut taxes yet spend more money on wars and hurricane relief. "It's going to cost whatever it costs," Mr. Bush said of Hurricane Katrina's relief and reconstruction efforts in a joint news conference with Mr. Putin last week. "And we should not raise taxes." Without being asked, Mr. Putin stepped up to defend the president against Mr. Bush's fiscal conservative critics who fear he is spending our children and grandchildren's nest eggs.
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