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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2012
A reader put out a request today for me to remark on the mantel/mantle  distinction, and you people know that I would do anything for you.  A mantel  is a shelf above a fireplace. The  mantelpiece can include the facing around the fireplace as well as the shelf. A mantle  can be a number of things, but the one that we need to pay most attention to is a cloak. A very specific cloak at that: "When they had crossed, Elijah said to Elisha, 'Tell me what I may do for you, before I am taken from you.' Elisha said, 'Please let me inherit a double share of your spirit.' He responded, 'You have asked a hard thing; yet, if you see me as I am being taken from you, it will be granted you; if not, it will not. As they continued walking and talking, a chariot of fire and horses of fire separated the two of them, and Elijah ascended in a whirlwind into heaven.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2012
A reader put out a request today for me to remark on the mantel/mantle  distinction, and you people know that I would do anything for you.  A mantel  is a shelf above a fireplace. The  mantelpiece can include the facing around the fireplace as well as the shelf. A mantle  can be a number of things, but the one that we need to pay most attention to is a cloak. A very specific cloak at that: "When they had crossed, Elijah said to Elisha, 'Tell me what I may do for you, before I am taken from you.' Elisha said, 'Please let me inherit a double share of your spirit.' He responded, 'You have asked a hard thing; yet, if you see me as I am being taken from you, it will be granted you; if not, it will not. As they continued walking and talking, a chariot of fire and horses of fire separated the two of them, and Elijah ascended in a whirlwind into heaven.
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SPORTS
By Joe Nicholson and Dick Sheridan and Joe Nicholson and Dick Sheridan,New York Daily News | June 7, 1995
New York Yankees legend Mickey Mantle was fighting for his life last night in a Dallas hospital, struck down by progressive liver failure.The condition of the former Yankee's liver, racked by cirrhosis from years of heavy drinking, has been so complicated by a powerful infection, said his doctor, that he needs a liver transplant to survive."
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 27, 2011
The American kabuki dance known as the Congressional supercommittee has ended where it started, with no deal on cutting $1.2 trillion from the federal deficit. What it has mostly accomplished is to underscore why public approval of Congress as a whole is mired at a ludicrous 9 percent in the polls. At the outset, logic seemed to suggest that having only a dozen experienced cooks in the kitchen made more sense than having 535 pairs of hands in the pie. The fallacy was in believing or hoping that the distinguished dozen would manage to put aside the groupthink dominating each party and come to an agreement on a sensible compromise.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | August 20, 1995
Mickey Mantle is pictured on one of the most popular -- and expensive -- baseball cards, No. 311 in the 1952 Topps set.But it was his autograph that collectors were seeking last week, shortly after the Hall of Famer's death.Joe Bosley, who specializes in vintage cards at The Old Ball Game in Reisterstown, says he has a good supply of Mantle cards. His store is closed on Mondays, and he says on Tuesday his answering machine had about half a dozen requests for autographed balls he couldn't fill.
SPORTS
By Dolores Kong and Dolores Kong,The Boston Globe | August 2, 1995
Less than two months after a transplant replaced his cancerous liver, Mickey Mantle is being treated for cancer that has spread to his lungs, doctors said yesterday, reopening questions about the fairness of the transplant process.Doctors at Baylor University Medical Center said if they had known the liver malignancy had spread, Mantle -- who waited only two days for a donor organ -- would not have received the transplant. But tests done at the time did not show any cancer outside the liver.
NEWS
By Larry Beinhart | June 22, 2004
SO THE REPUBLICANS - not just the Republicans, most of America - just had this orgy of posthumous Reaganism. All my knee-jerk liberal friends were appalled. The standard refrain was, "That's not the Reagan I remember." There were various specifics: "He busted unions." "He was against the environment." "He traded arms for hostages." "He couldn't tell the difference between movies and reality." "He supported death squads all over Central America." But nobody listened to the liberals. As usual.
SPORTS
By New York Daily News | August 13, 1995
DALLAS -- Mickey Mantle's desire to keep his battle with lung and abdominal cancer a private one was enforced yesterday by family and friends.Mantle's normally candid son David was especially tight-lipped yesterday over his father's medical condition as he emerged from his father's 16th-floor suite at Baylor University Medical Center."
SPORTS
By N.Y. Times News Service | February 1, 1994
NEW YORK -- Mickey Mantle and Pat Summerall are longtime friends, former star athletes in their 60s with different backgrounds and education.But they had one common, destructive vice: alcohol.Two years ago, after Summerall could not complete his announcing chores at the Masters golf tournament, friends and family intervened to persuade him to get help for his alcohol abuse. He reluctantly agreed to enter the Betty Ford Center, the clinic in Rancho Mirage, Calif., for a 33-day stay and has been sober ever since.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 20, 1995
DALLAS -- Nobody can place a monetary value on human life, but the medical costs of keeping Mickey Mantle alive for the 2 1/2 months until he died last Sunday came to more than $300,000. That's typical of how America apportions health care. Almost 30 percent of the nation's entire Medicare budget is spent during patients' last year of life.Most medical cost-cutters target the high cost of dying. But anyone following the trail from the statistics to a specific, and special, case like Mr. Mantle's might wonder where to aim.Had Mr. Mantle been an aging soccer player in Europe instead of a swaggering baseball legend in the United States, he probably would have succumbed without the liver transplant he received June 8. Many countries refuse transplants to patients as old as Mr. Mantle, who died at 63, or just put them on a waiting list.
SPORTS
By Mark Herrmann, Newsday | September 29, 2011
NEW YORK - Fifty years later, Sal Durante admitted he was so short, he needed to stand on his seat to catch that ball - the one hit by Roger Maris, a man whose stature just keeps growing. There was only admiration Saturday at Yankee Stadium for the reluctant and possibly under-appreciated star whose 61st home run on Oct. 1, 1961, broke what had been the most revered record in sports. The Yankees brought back Maris' family. They brought back two sons of Mickey Mantle, who had been the people's choice in a two-way race to break Babe Ruth's venerated single-season home run mark.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | August 26, 2011
A few weeks ago, I recalled a summer night in 1950s Baltimore when the gas street lamps came on as the sun set. Obviously, judging from my mail, others shared the experience of old lamplights: "I grew up on Calvin Avenue and we had a lamplighter for one lamp on the southwest side of the street," wrote Bob Ludwig. "Those several street lights closer to Greenmount Avenue had already been electrified, likely because of their proximity to what was then a really thriving business area.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | June 3, 2009
The Oriole with the hurricane swing turns 75 today. Happy birthday, Diamond Jim. What's the best gift for someone your age? "To live to be 76," Jim Gentile said. In the early 1960s, he was Baltimore's tempestuous slugger, a fiery first baseman with a whiplike cut that battered the air and roused the crowds, contact or no. Watching Gentile flail was as entertaining as seeing his home runs soar out of Memorial Stadium. Strikeouts begat tantrums, broken bats, smashed water coolers and ejections.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn | August 21, 2008
Mantle author is on deck Books Sportswriter Fred Glueckstein will discuss his new book, Mickey Mantle: Rookie in Pinstripes, at the Sports Legends Museum at Camden Yards on Sunday before the Orioles home game against the New York Yankees. The book chronicles the life of Hall of Famer Mantle from his childhood through his 1951 rookie season with the Yankees. Glueckstein explores his relationships with his father, teammates and coaches who helped shape his career. Mantle played his entire 18-year career for the Yankees and still holds several records.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to the Sun | April 18, 2008
Fourteen years ago, Meredith Bower read in her northern Baltimore community's newsletter a for-sale-by-owner house ad. Her life, and that of her family, was about to change forever. "I wrote the guy [saying], `We always loved your house'," said Bower, 46, who is director of communications at Maryvale Preparatory School in Brooklandville. In the winter of 1994, she and her husband, Craig Bower, 50, vice president of Asian operations at Pall Corp., purchased the 1905 Victorian in the city's Cedarcroft neighborhood.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,sun reporter | October 31, 2007
The promise of Parole as a retail magnet is closer to being realized this week as Westfield Annapolis unveils a $150 million mall expansion of 60 stores and restaurants just in time to capitalize on the holiday shopping season. Tomorrow's opening will make the mall the largest in Anne Arundel County, at 1.5 million square feet. The completion of the 240,000-square-foot addition on Westfield's north side comes as building has kicked into high gear at Annapolis Towne Centre at Parole, a $400 million project of homes, shops and office space less than a mile from the mall.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 1, 2007
Finally, a TV comedy worth going out of your way to see. And it's on the network some might think least likely to succeed in delivering one: CW. But not since Northern Exposure's Joel Fleischman found himself stranded in Cicely, Alaska, has there been a fish as swimmingly out of water as Raja Musharaff on the new CW sitcom Aliens in America. Funny, charming and smart, the ultimate appeal of this series about a middle-class Wisconsin family and the foreign exchange student who comes into their home is the winning way in which it explores core tensions of post-Sept.
NEWS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,Sun reporter | September 13, 2006
It's not that Severna Park football coach J.P. Hines doesn't believe in senior leadership or isn't grateful that he has the experience of 28 seniors on his 47-player roster. It's just that he doesn't think leadership is limited to seniors - nor the best talent, for that matter. "Senior leadership is not really important to me," said Hines, whose 28 seniors are the most he has had on a Falcons team in his nine years as coach. "I have captains who are juniors. I expect leadership from my seniors.
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