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Manslaughter Conviction

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By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1999
A Baltimore judge's contentious behavior toward a defense lawyer, which included suggesting the jury might wish to aim the weapon in the case at him, prevented his client from getting a fair trial, the state's highest court ruled yesterday.In wiping out the manslaughter conviction of a Baltimore store owner, the Maryland Court of Appeals ruled that Circuit Judge Elsbeth L. Bothe's behavior toward lawyer William H. Murphy Jr. was so out of line that his client, John Howard Johnson, did not get a fair trial in the winter of 1994-1995.
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NEWS
By Elizabeth Evans and The York Dispatch (MCT) | December 21, 2011
Michael and Nanette Craver were back in York County Court Wednesday morning, where a judge refused to overturn their convictions and declined to reduce their nearly $100,000 in court costs. A jury previously acquitted the former Carroll Township parents of murder, instead finding them guilty of involuntary manslaughter, two counts of child endangerment and conspiracy to commit all three charges. On Nov. 18, they were sentenced to time served, each having spent 567 days in county prison.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2005
An Annapolis man was sentenced to 10 years in prison yesterday for fatally shooting a partygoer, after a judge said the defendant let previous efforts to help him slide by. "There is a need to protect the public," Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Michael E. Loney said before sentencing Mario Jermaine Kaskins to a decade in prison, the maximum allowed for his manslaughter conviction. Kaskins, 22, was convicted in December in the death of Damon Michael Rhodes on Aug. 10, 2002. The 32-year-old Baltimore man was attending a birthday party in an American Legion hall in Annapolis when he was shot in the neck.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2011
Maryland's highest court on Thursday granted a new manslaughter trial to Ricky Savoy, saying that a jury instruction in his Baltimore trial in the 1993 death of Marvin Watts was improper. In a 5-2 ruling that overturned the conviction, the majority of the Court of Appeals judges wrote that a jury instruction lowered prosecutors' burden of proof from the familiar "beyond a reasonable doubt," which is what is constitutionally required. A judge told them that proof was also to be to a "moral certainty," which was explained as "based upon convincing grounds of probability.
NEWS
By Flynn McRoberts and Flynn McRoberts,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 9, 2003
The jury in Rep. Bill Janklow's hometown deliberated for about five hours yesterday before convicting him of manslaughter in a traffic accident that killed a motorcyclist. Janklow, the favorite son of Flandreau, S.D., took even less time after the verdict was read to announce his own decision: South Dakota's only member of the House of Representatives and a political giant in the state for decades said he would resign from Congress. His abrupt resignation gives the Republican Party as much time as possible to mount a campaign to defend his seat.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Evening Sun Staff | September 19, 1991
Pearl Jones did not scream or cry out, but she could barely control her anger after a Baltimore County Circuit Court judge dismissed manslaughter charges against the 37-year-old Stevensville man who killed her son in a drunken-driving crash on the Baltimore Beltway in June 1989.Jones rushed from the courtroom where Judge John Grason Turnbull 2nd had just ruled that manslaughter charges against John Charles Glaser were dismissed on double jeopardy grounds. Turnbull also lowered Glaser's bail from $30,000 to $5,000.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Evening Sun Staff xHC lTB | September 18, 1991
A Baltimore County judge today dismissed manslaughter charges against John Charles Glaser, 37, the Stephensville man whose previous auto-manslaughter conviction was overturned because he had paid a $35 traffic ticket.Glaser, who was sentenced to five years in prison in 1990 for manslaughter in the highway death of Everett Lee Jones, 30, of North Point, had that conviction overturned in May on double jeopardy grounds. The Constitution prohibits prosecution twice for the same crime.Circuit Court Judge John Grason Turnbull 2nd today said it would be improper to let the state attempt the impossible -- to prosecute Glaser for manslaughter without mentioning the fact that he was driving the wrong way on the Beltway.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | December 18, 1991
The case of a Stevensville man whose conviction for automobile manslaughter was reversed because he paid a $35 fine may be headed back to the appeals court, after his guilty plea yesterday in Baltimore County Circuit Court to driving while intoxicated.Judge John Grason Turnbull II sentenced John Charles Glaser, 37, to one year in prison. He was freed because he has served almost two years since being jailed in the June 30, 1989, traffic death of Everett Jones, 30, of North Point.Immediately after that accident, Mr. Glaser paid a $35 fine for driving the wrong way on the Beltway in the crash.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | August 20, 1992
A 39-year-old Baltimore County man with a drunken driving record dating to 1974 and an auto manslaughter conviction in 1981 has been convicted again of drunken driving and sent to the county Detention Center for 90 days.Deputy State's Attorney Howard Merker, calling the sentence lenient, said he had asked for a significant period of jail time for the offender.John William Snyder of the 1700 block of Redwood Ave., which is off Loch Raven Boulevard east of Towson, was found guilty Monday in Towson District Court of drunken driving in an April 25 incident on Amuskai Road, near his home.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Thomas W. Waldron contributed to this article | March 28, 1997
For the second year, prosecutors and women's rights activists are struggling to eliminate a Maryland law that lets a spouse-killer get a lighter sentence by claiming the husband or wife was unfaithful."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2010
One man stabbed another in an argument over marijuana — hardly a unique motive for a killing in Baltimore. But this confrontation occurred on South Calvert Street in the heart of the city's tourist district, two blocks from the Inner Harbor. It happened shortly after 10 in the morning on a warm spring day in April 2007. It happened in a stairwell of a McDonald's restaurant. A tourist from New York followed the suspect and called the police, who quickly made an arrest. Lewis Edward Rich, 22, who lived in Lower Charles Village, was charged with first-degree murder but was convicted of voluntary manslaughter and sentenced to 10 years in prison.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and jamison.hensley@baltsun.com | April 1, 2010
Ravens wide receiver Donte' Stallworth, signed as a free agent Feb. 16 after missing last season because he was suspended by the league, said today that "it's a daily process" in dealing with his past. On March 14, 2009, Stallworth struck and killed a pedestrian in Miami Beach, Fla. "Now that I'm back playing, it's not in the back of my mind," Stallworth said. "It's something I deal with everyday, waking up in the morning and going to sleep at night. It's a tough situation for everyone involved.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun reporter | September 28, 2007
The Court of Special Appeals has overturned the conviction of a Columbia woman in the choking death of a fellow Loyola College doctoral student in 2005, ruling that Howard County detectives waited until she made incriminating statements to advise her of her Miranda rights. Unless Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler decides to appeal the ruling to the state's highest court, prosecutors will either reach a plea agreement and lower Melissa Burch Harton's sentence or retry her on the charge of involuntary manslaughter.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2005
An Annapolis man was sentenced to 10 years in prison yesterday for fatally shooting a partygoer, after a judge said the defendant let previous efforts to help him slide by. "There is a need to protect the public," Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Michael E. Loney said before sentencing Mario Jermaine Kaskins to a decade in prison, the maximum allowed for his manslaughter conviction. Kaskins, 22, was convicted in December in the death of Damon Michael Rhodes on Aug. 10, 2002. The 32-year-old Baltimore man was attending a birthday party in an American Legion hall in Annapolis when he was shot in the neck.
NEWS
By Flynn McRoberts and Flynn McRoberts,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 9, 2003
The jury in Rep. Bill Janklow's hometown deliberated for about five hours yesterday before convicting him of manslaughter in a traffic accident that killed a motorcyclist. Janklow, the favorite son of Flandreau, S.D., took even less time after the verdict was read to announce his own decision: South Dakota's only member of the House of Representatives and a political giant in the state for decades said he would resign from Congress. His abrupt resignation gives the Republican Party as much time as possible to mount a campaign to defend his seat.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2002
An Anne Arundel County circuit judge gave a seven-year prison sentence yesterday to a Pasadena woman who claimed she was a battered spouse and who killed her estranged husband a day before he was expected to win custody of their son. Kelly Clutter, 35, looked relieved but sad as she turned toward friends and relatives in the packed courtroom at the end of a two-hour hearing before Judge Philip T. Caroom. She could have received 30 years in prison for the killing of David Clutter Sr., 32. The seven years for manslaughter and a gun violation means she could be released in about three years.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Staff Writer | November 6, 1993
Stephen Michael Smith, convicted three years ago and sent to prison for an alcohol-related auto manslaughter, was in Baltimore County Circuit Court again yesterday, this time for drunken driving.Judge John Owen Hennegan found Smith, 24, guilty yesterday of speeding and driving while intoxicated (DWI). The charges stem from a May 14 incident in which Smith had a blood-alcohol level of 0.17. The standard for driving while intoxicated is 0.10.A county police officer testified that he followed Smith's pickup truck from the Baltimore Beltway onto northbound Interstate 83, and saw him speeding and repeatedly changing lanes without signaling.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1996
Victims' rights groups sharply criticized the 120-day jail term given yesterday by a Howard County judge to a 52-year-old accountant in the 1993 chloroform death of his 20-year-old girlfriend.Melvin Robert Bowers, formerly of Ellicott City, could have received 10 years in prison for his Nov. 8 involuntary manslaughter conviction in the death of Geneva Marie Hodge of Baltimore. She died after Bowers put a chloroform-soaked rag over her nose and mouth and fell asleep, leaving the rag in place.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 29, 2000
Maryland prosecutors called on the General Assembly yesterday to make it less likely that drivers who kill will get off with just a traffic ticket. Flanked by family members of highway accident victims, five state's attorneys held a news conference in Annapolis to endorse legislation that would create the offense of "homicide by aggressive driving." The bill would allow incarceration of up to three years in cases where an "aggressive" driver -- someone who breaks multiple traffic laws -- causes a fatality.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Scott Higham and Caitlin Francke and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1999
The attorney for a man wrongfully convicted of murder because the Baltimore state's attorney's office withheld critical evidence said yesterday she will ask that her client receive a new trial and that his conviction be overturned.Also yesterday, The Sun learned that the prosecutor who handled the case, Nancy Beth Pollack, left her job shortly before the newspaper published a two-part series this week outlining evidence problems at the Baltimore courthouse. Sources in the state's attorney's office said she was forced to resign.
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