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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | April 9, 2010
The Baltimore County mansion known as Cliffeholme, built in the mid-19th century and owned by businessman Stephen A. Geppi, was bought back at a foreclosure sale Thursday by the mortgage lender. A trustee for lender Bank of America bid $2.8 million for the nearly 14,000-square-foot residence on 9 acres in Green Spring Valley. Geppi and his wife, Melinda, who bought the property in 2004 for $4.8 million, defaulted on the loan in February 2009 and owed $3.2 million on the mortgage, according to court documents.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | April 8, 2010
One of the Baltimore area's most historically significant residences is headed for a foreclosure auction today, more than two years after owner and prominent businessman Stephen A. Geppi put it up for sale for $7.7 million amid the slumping housing market. The mid-19th-century mansion in Green Spring Valley known as Cliffeholme, with eight bedrooms and nine fireplaces, is scheduled for sale at the Baltimore County Courthouse with an outstanding mortgage debt of $3.25 million, court records show.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | April 8, 2010
The Baltimore County mansion known as Cliffeholme, built in the mid-19th century and owned by businessman Stephen A. Geppi, was bought back at a foreclosure sale Thursday by the mortgage lender. A trustee for lender Bank of America bid $2.8 million for the nearly 14,000-square-foot residence on 9 acres in Green Spring Valley. Geppi and his wife, Melinda, who bought the property in 2004 for $4.8 million, defaulted on the loan in February 2009 and owed $3.2 million on the mortgage, according to court documents.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey | annie.linskey@baltsun.com | January 14, 2010
Several hundred anti-tax "Tea Party" protesters converged on a courtyard outside the governor's mansion Wednesday night after the Maryland General Assembly opened its legislative session, shouting, "Vote them out." The star protester: Former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., a Republican who is considering a rematch against the Democratic governor who defeated him four years ago. Ehrlich, who attended the rally with his wife, Kendel, and several former aides, did not speak but milled around the gathering of activists.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard , Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2009
There's no mistaking a historic estate. A long driveway with old trees off a country road is one indication. Shutters that close over bubbled and wavy windows is another. Outbuildings and symmetry of construction are clues. The giveaway is the marker bearing the name of the land and home. Clynmalira, owned by Dick and Nancy Councill, rests in grand fashion on what was originally a 5,000-acre manor surveyed in 1705 for Annapolitan Charles Carroll, the attorney general. The Carroll family made little use of the land until the 19th century, when Carroll's great-great-grandson Henry Carroll built the house in 1822 out of bricks made on the property, in what is now northern Baltimore County.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2009
T here's no mistaking a historic estate. A long driveway with old trees off a country road is one indication. Shutters that close over bubbled and wavy windows is another. Outbuildings and symmetry of construction are clues. The giveaway is the marker bearing the name of the land and home. Clynmalira, owned by Dick and Nancy Councill, rests in grand fashion on what was originally a 5,000-acre manor surveyed in 1705 for Annapolitan Charles Carroll, the attorney general. The Carroll family made little use of the land until the 19th century, when Carroll's great-great-grandson Henry Carroll built the house in 1822 out of bricks made on the property, in what is now northern Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | October 10, 2009
The decrepit mansion once served as home to the president of the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore, but two decades of brush has grown and, along with vandals, has made it uninhabitable. Cue the goats. In what's the first step to a $10 million project to transform this piece of Druid Hill Park into an environmental and recreational center for the city, the four-legged weed whackers have cleared a half-acre ring of ivy and other invasive species. The herd of 40 will be brought back to clear the rest of the 9-acre parcel that few have used, legally anyway, for years.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Meredith Cohn and Laura Smitherman and Meredith Cohn,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | August 6, 2009
Gov. Martin O'Malley and his wife, Katie, have put a "green" stamp on the governor's mansion since moving in three years ago. Next week, they will take environmentalism to a new level by installing solar panels on the roof. The panels, and other upgrades such as more efficient lighting and temperature controls, are part of a broader project to save energy at state-operated buildings. The solar array will provide about half of the hot water used by the mansion's residents, and will be installed inconspicuously to preserve the character of the 140-year-old historic mansion that is one of the most visible landmarks in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Larry.carson@baltsun.com | August 2, 2009
The two-story, white-painted mahogany portico that is now the main entrance to the late Elizabeth C. "Nancy" Smith's beloved 19th-century mansion evokes a time long past, although it is newly, and painstakingly, restored. "It almost re-creates the old photos," Howard County park planner Clara Gouin said, imagining the woman who lived there all her life and the house as she knew it as a young woman before World War II, living on what was then a remote farm in pastoral Howard County. That's exactly the effect National Park Service exhibits specialist Brandon Gordon, 29, and his co-workers wanted as they completed three years of work on the outside of the brick house destined to become the centerpiece of 300-acre Blandair Park in east Columbia.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | June 19, 2009
Some preservationists fight bulldozers and wrecking balls. Marty and Tony Azola had to outwit a black vulture. The female vulture laid eggs in the attic of Ruscombe, a vacant 1860s-era mansion near Cylburn Arboretum that the Azolas proposed to restore for commercial tenants. Because the black vulture is a migratory species protected by law, the father-and-son development team had to wait until her eggs hatched and she and her offspring flew away before they could begin work. She came back the next year and laid eggs again, delaying the project even more.
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