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EXPLORE
November 3, 2011
16th annual Needleart exhibit opens Friday Needleart 2011 fills the rooms of Montpelier Mansion, 9652 Muirkirk Road, with an array of stitched art, from needlepoint to ribbon work. Sponsored by Stitching Pretty of Laurel, the exhibit opens Friday, Nov. 4 from 3 to 7 p.m. and continues Nov. 5 through 27, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. (closed Thanksgiving). This year's theme is "Life on the Chesapeake. " Judges choose winners in several categories and exhibit visitors are invited to vote for the People's Choice award.
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EXPLORE
October 28, 2011
There's a treasure sitting in our neighborhood, constructed between 1781 and 1785. It's the Montpelier Mansion. The house is breathtaking; the land surrounding is pristine and well maintained by the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, Department of Parks and Recreation, and Prince George's County. Seeing this historic property first-hand is indeed a rewarding experience for all. One of the main focuses of the history of Montpelier is to educate guests of all ages.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2011
A long-neglected mansion on the city's west side has been restored to its 19th-century grandeur so that it can provide a home and hope for homeless women. Dozens of volunteers have adopted rooms in the 8,000-square-foot Victorian, built in 1893 by the owner of a Baltimore tugboat company. They swept away years of abandonment, sanded floors, painted walls, restored stained-glass windows, repaired fireplaces and polished the fixtures. They have rebuilt the kitchen, added new bathrooms and donated linens, handmade quilts and every stick of furniture — save for the few pieces that came with the house.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | February 25, 2011
Time, fashion and finances were not kind to a fabled West Baltimore mansion, a winter palace built by 19th-century railroad builder and engineer Thomas deKay Winans. He gave his residence a curious name, Alexandroffsky. It was every bit a walled Xanadu that caused Baltimoreans to gasp and gossip until the day the wreckers flattened it. The mansion's site is now part of the University of Maryland biotech park. The story behind Alexandroffsky is a good tale, well-documented by Baltimore County historian John McGrain.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2011
The Perry Hall Mansion, one of Baltimore County's most historically significant buildings, sits on a hill in a fairly fresh coat of white stucco, poised between redemption and decay.  The new stucco is already peeling in spots and the straw-colored grass is long enough to bury your boots. While there are new windows, heating, air conditioning, electrical and fire alarm systems, wallpaper is peeling everywhere, plaster is cracking, and the place seems abandoned behind a wire fence and forbidding sign: "Baltimore County Property.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2010
The fire-damaged property at Charles and Madison streets, known as the Park Plaza, marks a gateway to Baltimore's Mount Vernon cultural district and serves as a symbol of the neighborhood's vibrancy. Associated with a century and a half of well-known Marylanders, from Baltimore Sun founder Arunah S. Abell to former ambassador to Luxembourg Kingdon Gould Jr. to arts patron Constance Caplan, the five-level building and its carriage house at Charles and Madison streets have been a laboratory of architectural adaptation.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
Sister Katherine Homburg stepped off a tour bus Tuesday and easily slipped back a half-century to her days at the Lutheran Deaconess House and School in Towson. She studied for her ministry on a campus known today as Greenwood, the Baltimore County Board of Education's administrative offices. "As soon as we drove up the driveway, I recognized the curve in the road and the brick buildings," said Homburg, a retired member of the Deaconess Community of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America; the deaconesses are convening in Baltimore this week.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2010
Lady , the golden retriever who graced Maryland state highway maps and gubernatorial Christmas cards, died last month. She was 13 and lived in the governor's mansion. One of many pets in the O'Malley menagerie, Lady came to the family 10 years ago when Gov. Martin O'Malley was mayor of Baltimore. A friend of a friend had some health problems and had to give her up. The O'Malleys, who then had three young children (the fourth came later), were looking for a dog that was housebroken.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | May 30, 2010
Back when Bill Clinton was running for president for the first time, my Chicago cousin announced that he was too cynical to vote because Democrats and Republicans had become so much alike he had lost all sense of distinctions. "Tweedledum and Tweedledee," he used to say. Both parties are completely compromised by big business and status quo politics, he said. There was a permanent political class in America — a big tent that covers Republicans and Democrats, their affluent friends, special-interest lobbyists and influential insiders.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2010
When designers sign on to transform a house into a "show house," they aren't working with a blank slate. It's more likely they are working with a slate that has issues and challenges and charming quirks. A slate that needs some TLC. Homeowners hunting for the right wall color or trying to cover up unsightly elements in a room can probably relate. So we took a tour of this year's Baltimore Symphony Associates' Decorators' Show House in Pikesville, which opens to the public Saturday, to search out designer secrets that homeowners can use on their own slates.
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