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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | June 18, 1995
Back when North Baltimore was suburbia, the Gallagher Mansion looked like just another city resident's country villa, one of many dotting the former Govanstown landscape along York Road.A doctor first lived behind the thick stone walls in the mid-1800s, treating patients in a side room. Later, the family of a local grocer put down roots that spread over three generations.Today, tangled vines wind their way up the boarded, rotting shell of the 17-room manor house. The still imposing mansion seems out of time and place in waist-high grass, behind a Ford dealership, across the lane from a townhouse development.
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NEWS
November 21, 2002
The Howard County Council of Garden Clubs will sponsor two tours Dec. 9 of Waverly Mansion in Marriottsville, which has been decorated for the holidays. A morning tour will be offered from 10 a.m. to noon. The evening tour, which will feature candlelight and seasonal music by Die Liedersanger Madrigal Singers, will be held from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Cider and cookies will be served. The cost is $3; $2 for senior citizens, and $1 for children. The mansion is at 2300 Waverly Mansion Drive.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Meredith Cohn and Laura Smitherman and Meredith Cohn,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | August 6, 2009
Gov. Martin O'Malley and his wife, Katie, have put a "green" stamp on the governor's mansion since moving in three years ago. Next week, they will take environmentalism to a new level by installing solar panels on the roof. The panels, and other upgrades such as more efficient lighting and temperature controls, are part of a broader project to save energy at state-operated buildings. The solar array will provide about half of the hot water used by the mansion's residents, and will be installed inconspicuously to preserve the character of the 140-year-old historic mansion that is one of the most visible landmarks in Annapolis.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | June 5, 1994
In 14 years, Bruce Scherr had just about built it all, from sprawling homes in the suburbs to affordable, $72,000 townhouses in the city. Then he met the ultimate challenge.As an officer in the Home Builders Association of Maryland, the president of Scherr Homes had worked on planning a "Dream Homes" exposition three years ago. As the economy began improving, the group finally found a central site that could support $500,000-plus homes and a developer -- Greenebaum & Rose Associates -- who could work with multiple builders.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1996
The midway point of his term won't arrive for six months, but Gov. Parris N. Glendening has history on his mind.He's preparing to pose for his gubernatorial portrait -- and wealthy Maryland business people are being asked to pay the artist.An accompanying portrait of the governor's wife, Frances Anne, and several other mansion-related projects also would be covered by contributions from business people to the recently established Government House Foundation."The portraits really aren't the focus," Mrs. Glendening said yesterday of the foundation.
FEATURES
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 16, 1996
Today, if you spent $100,000 on a house and all its furnishings, you'd probably be spending below the average. But in 1893, it bought you a mansion complete with intercom, security system, elevator, central heating and bathrooms with running water.The Rosemount Victorian House Museum in Pueblo, Colo., built for Pueblo merchant, miner, banker and rancher John Thatcher, was a marvel in its time. The 37-room, four-story home was named for the favorite flower of Thatcher's wife, Margaret, and features roses in the decor throughout.
NEWS
By JEAN LESLIE | December 12, 1994
Tonight, the Howard County Council of Garden Clubs invites you to join the annual Candlelight Tour of Waverly Mansion. The garden clubs have dolled up the mansion in its holiday best for visitors to tour from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Die Liedersanger Madrigal Singers will carol while visitors enjoy evergreens, antiques, mulled cider and fudge.Waverly Mansion's history is peppered with Howard County's favorite family names.John Dorsey bought the land from Daniel Carroll in 1750 as a wedding gift for his son Nathan.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | March 8, 1991
MOVERS AND SHAKERS: Haven't you just been dying to know who serves on the Governor's Mansion Trust with Maryland's official hostess, Hilda Mae Snoops? Nowhere have I seen all those names except in the good old Maryland Manual. It's there, the rules and the names of the Governor's Mansion Trust, which was founded in 1980 as the Government House Trust and revamped and renamed in 1988.Martin Walsh Jr., secretary of general services, chairs the committee, which consists of voting members Hilda Mae Snoops, the governor's designee; Nancy German, Senate president designee; Charles Ryan, House speaker designee, and J. Rodney Little, director of Maryland Historical Trust.
BUSINESS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1997
SEVERNA PARK -- Great houses, like great ideas, often outlive their creators -- and so it is with Wroxeter-on-Severn, a turn-of-the-century Normandy mansion built by a wealthy Edwardian industrialist and being offered for sale Tuesday at an absolute auction.The house has survived almost a century of shifting owners and changing fortunes, said owner Jim Bowersox, who rescued it from a wrecking ball in 1992 and has spent five years restoring it to its original elegance."By the time we got around to it, it was really on its last legs," Bowersox said of the 33-room mansion he and his wife, Linda, share with their two children.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | March 26, 1995
Stop to see what is happening at 111 Springdale Ave. in New Windsor and the homeowner might hand you a paintbrush.Joan V. Bradford is scraping and painting the walls and converting the century-old mansion into the town's first bed-and-breakfast operation."
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