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NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 7, 1998
FOR THE SECOND TIME in six months, pupils from Friendship Valley Elementary School will be honored at the governor's mansion in Annapolis.Fifth-graders Katie Allen, Tim Evelius, Brittany Byers, T J Farley, Will Landon, Patricia Repsher, Kurt Udseth, Anna Zawacki and their parents will participate in a dedication ceremony to "Celebrate the Holidays through Literature" at 1 p.m. Saturday.Their invitations came from Gov. Parris N. Glendening and first lady Frances Hughes Glendening after each pupil, under the direction of Friendship Valley art teacher Deb Welle, created ornaments for Christmas trees at the mansion.
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NEWS
By Joseph R. L. Sterne | March 25, 2002
SECRET PLANS seem to be underway for the first Deep Pockets Gala at the $1.4 million Towson University presidential mansion in Guilford. The university's new Center for the Study of Entrepreneurial Acquisitiveness has prepared behavioral recommendations and talking points for Mark L. Perkins, whose "coronation" (an alumnus' word) as the university's 11th president was celebrated on the Ides of March. According to quasi-final documents, President Perkins is asking Bill Gates and his wife, Melinda, to be his first guests of honor at his first big fund-raising bash.
BUSINESS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1997
SEVERNA PARK -- Great houses, like great ideas, often outlive their creators -- and so it is with Wroxeter-on-Severn, a turn-of-the-century Normandy mansion built by a wealthy Edwardian industrialist and being offered for sale Tuesday at an absolute auction.The house has survived almost a century of shifting owners and changing fortunes, said owner Jim Bowersox, who rescued it from a wrecking ball in 1992 and has spent five years restoring it to its original elegance."By the time we got around to it, it was really on its last legs," Bowersox said of the 33-room mansion he and his wife, Linda, share with their two children.
FEATURES
By Carleton Jones | June 9, 1991
Old mansions on river fronts and tidal streams are nothing new in quaint (and rich) Talbot county. But the Combsberry estate is something specialAge is one reason. It's about 273 by the best estimates and features an ancient, 1730 pile from the days of the Georgian kings, when Marylanders hadn't outnumbered the original Indian population for too long.Combsberry, along its 46-foot river front, also has mysterious, paneled and recessed windows with glazed brick headers, windows of vague Palladian form, rare in early Colonial architecture (but not on English buildings of the same era, say architectural historians)
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | July 24, 1992
Oliver Beach residents who have been fighting for two years to preserve the open land around a historic 1819 mansion on the Gunpowder River have won a rare victory from Baltimore County's bureaucracy.The county Board of Appeals reversed an earlier approval of Emerald Development Corp.'s proposed 12-home Oliver Landing project. The board decided July 16 that the county planning board did not properly consider the historic significance of the three acres around the mansion.Such reversals are rare, since the board is legally constrained from throwing out development approvals unless they're found to be arbitrary or procured by fraud.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | February 6, 1993
In an unusual but happy conclusion to what began 2 1/2 years ago as a bitter fight over the preservation of an historic 1819 mansion and its surrounding vistas in eastern Baltimore County, a developer and community residents celebrated a common victory this week with a bottle of champagne.The Friends of Oliver House Inc., the community group, had bought five housing lots from the Emerald Development company, which originally had proposed building 14 homes on four acres surrounding the historic building.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | March 8, 1991
Hilda Mae Snoops is making a list."Some things we can give away to museums," she told me. "And some to historic buildings. And some things we can sell."Mrs. Snoops, Maryland's hostess and the governor's best friend, is planning to empty out much of the governor's mansion.Some things will be given away and some things will be sold, the money going to the Governor's Mansion Foundation and not Mrs. Snoops.And Mrs. Snoops seems intent on getting rid of the mansion's furnishings before she leaves her post so her enemies can't get rid of them after she leaves her post.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | March 1, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Hilda Mae Snoops started spring cleaning a little early yesterday with a plan to empty the Governor's Mansion of most of its furnishings so her critics can enjoy a return to the residence's "seedy" pre-William Donald Schaefer appearance.She said she might even unload the $168,000, 12-foot outdoor fountain installed on the property less than a year ago."I've been rebuffed continually by the press and by delegates and senators who want a little cheap publicity," Mrs. Snoops explained.
NEWS
December 21, 1990
Two young men have been charged with trespassing on the grounds of the Governor's Mansion in Annapolis after they allegedly were found carrying some workmen's tools and paint thinner.The two men "entered the property uninvited" about 2:30 a.m. Dec. 7, according to documents filed in Annapolis District Court.Brendon C. Smith, 19, of Riva, and Chad J. Godhard, 20, of College Park, were charged with trespassing at a public agency after hours, a misdemeanor, records show.Godhard also was charged with being drunk at a public place and causing a disturbance, according to documents.
NEWS
June 26, 1991
An antique mid-19th century cast-iron dolphin lawn ornament at the Hampton Mansion in Towson has been reported stolen, an FBI spokesman said yesterday.Authorities believe that whoever took the rare dolphin -- valued at about $12,000 -- may have thought it was made of copper or bronze and intended to sell it for the metal, said James Dearborn, a spokesman for the FBI office in Baltimore. The FBI is investigating the theft because the mansion sits on federal property managed by the National Park Service.
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