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NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun Staff Writer | May 14, 1995
Hampton Mansion, the 18th-century centerpiece of a National Historic Site in Towson, has a radioactive intruder in the basement.The invisible invader is radon, the cancer-causing gas that is as old as the hills -- and somewhat mysterious as to how big a threat it is.Colorless and odorless, radon seeps into buildings from the soil. Concentrations usually reach a peak in the winter because closed windows reduce ventilation.In February, one room in the mansion basement had a reading of 11.6 picocuries per liter of air, well above the Environmental Protection Agency's risk point of 4 picocuries for dwellings.
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NEWS
By Francis Rahl | August 5, 1998
THE BIG house at the corner of West Lombard and South Stricker streets is vacant and slowly crumbling. Drab gray rectangles of plywood cover its 40 windows, plants sprout from voids in one brick wall.A 1992 Sun editorial identified the venerable mansion as a classic example of "demolition by neglect," and it remains so. Years of neglect by the building's owners, ineffective legal alternatives and bureaucratic delays have all contributed to its decline.There are many such buildings in Baltimore.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | February 25, 2011
Time, fashion and finances were not kind to a fabled West Baltimore mansion, a winter palace built by 19th-century railroad builder and engineer Thomas deKay Winans. He gave his residence a curious name, Alexandroffsky. It was every bit a walled Xanadu that caused Baltimoreans to gasp and gossip until the day the wreckers flattened it. The mansion's site is now part of the University of Maryland biotech park. The story behind Alexandroffsky is a good tale, well-documented by Baltimore County historian John McGrain.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 9, 2014
The Baltimore City Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation on Tuesday approved a developer's exterior renovation plans for the conversion of an historic former home for unwed mothers into apartments. CHAP voted 6-1 to approve staff recommendations endorsing the renovation of the mansion, the old Florence Crittenton Home for Girls at 3110 Crittenton Place in Hampden. Developer John Brooks wants to convert the house into 14 apartments, plus one in a nearby cottage.
NEWS
By Norris West and Norris West,Evening Sun Staff | November 5, 1990
A woman opened the large door to the Lilburn Mansion, a grand stone-faced structure perched atop a steep hill in Ellicott City's historic district, and identified herself as a bookkeeper for the home's owner.She said the owner, Dr. Randall G. Brandon, was away, but she said not to bother coming back. Brandon was selling the place after living there three years, and didn't care to talk about the ghost stories so as not to scare off prospective buyers.For years now, Lilburn has been reputed to be the residence of Margaret, a 19th century ghost.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 13, 2003
The hydraulic jaws of an excavator took giant bites out of the Mazie Smith Stoll house in Glen Burnie yesterday morning, shaking the foundation of the Civil War-era structure and causing masonry and wood beams to collapse in a cloud of dust. By dusk, the once-regal mansion at Crain Highway and Furnace Branch Road was but a memory, or at best an archival image on computer disc. The owner of the 19th-century farmhouse, which historians think might have sheltered runaway slaves, hired a demolition crew last week to raze it. Anne Arundel County had threatened to take owner Nageswara K. Karipineni of Clarksville to court if he didn't tear down the house, which has been empty since the early 1980s.
NEWS
By Melvin Durai and Melvin Durai,Contributing Writer | April 24, 1993
For many years, visitors to the Hampton National Historic Site have admired the grand old mansion that forms the centerpiece of the 60-acre national park.Built in the 1780s, the ornate, lavishly furnished structure housed several generations of the Ridgelys, a prominent Maryland family.Tomorrow, for the first time ever, visitors to the Towson park will be able to compare the Ridgelys' affluent lifestyle with the bare existence of their slaves.The park is allowing people to enter or look into the slave quarters, the overseer's house, the outhouses, the family cemetery and several other buildings on the sprawling estate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SLOANE BROWN | May 21, 2000
There's nothing quite like dining on the front lawn of a grand old house, reveling in a summery evening, and relaxing after an afternoon golf game. That's what Civic Works offered 200 supporters at its second-annual "Spring Swing -- Golf Tournament and Dinner Auction" at Clifton Mansion. As guests supped and socialized, the sounds of songbirds mingled in the background with 1940s swing music, recalling an earlier era. In the crowd: Dana Gans and Randy LeFaivre, event co-chairs; Marc Bunting and Stuart Brooks, event committee members; Dana Stein, Civic Works president and executive director; Tony Hawkins, Civic Works board chair; city Councilwoman Helen Holton, Mimi Roeder Vaughan, Tricia Ellis and Fred Struever, board members; Bev Thomas, Baltimore community activist; Rob Bostick, BGE marketing and energy services manager; Paul Ellis, ReVisions Foundation executive director; Diane Gordy, state administrator; Chuck Goldsborough, Team Lexus league driver; Steve Hazan, Bank of America vice president; Terry McDonnell, general sales manager for Carroll County Foods; Sibyl Kane, AmeriCorps VISTA volunteer; and Tony Pagnotti, WMAR-TV personality.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | July 1, 1993
For 15 years, the Gallagher Mansion has been a blight on the York Road corridor -- a vacant building that looks like a haunted house year-round.City officials, who control the mansion, have done their best to keep it standing, in the hope that a private developer would come along and restore it. Seven years ago, they awarded it to a developer who wanted to turn it into offices, but he never moved ahead with his plan.Now a new group has emerged that may finally be able to bring the imposing Italianate structure to life.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2001
The long abandoned Sellers Mansion at the southeast corner of Lafayette Square looks like the model for a Charles Addams cartoon or a movie set for a Hitchcock thriller. But there is hope for the old mansion, the first house to be built in Lafayette Square in 1869. Judson B. Wood, president of the St. James Development Corp., which owns the Sellers Mansion, said recently that the historic house (a designate to the National Register of Historic Places) will most likely be converted to senior citizen apartments to augment the St. James Terrace Apartments next door.
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