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By Newsday | March 25, 1991
NEW YORK -- The couple of the '80s who split in the '90s, Donald and Ivana Trump officially brought down the curtain Saturday when they settled on the divorce deal of the decade.In discussions Friday that went from 5 p.m. to midnight, Donald and Ivana met face to face in the Park Avenue law office of Jay Goldberg, who represents Donald. Things were testy for a while. But, Mr. Goldberg said, "As with all final divorce negotiations, things started off hot, and then reason overcame emotion."In the end, the $14 million cash settlement came down to who gets the old Mercedes (Ms. Trump)
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By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
In 1936, the owners of Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore built a manor home on more than 54 acres in Howard County that once belonged to the descendants of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. That property at 3925 Folly Quarter Road in Ellicott City is now for sale for $7 million. "I call this one of the prime, principal properties of Howard County, sitting on one of the highest elevations there," said listing agent Creig Northrop, of the Creig Northrop Team of Long & Foster Real Estate.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | April 8, 2010
One of the Baltimore area's most historically significant residences is headed for a foreclosure auction today, more than two years after owner and prominent businessman Stephen A. Geppi put it up for sale for $7.7 million amid the slumping housing market. The mid-19th-century mansion in Green Spring Valley known as Cliffeholme, with eight bedrooms and nine fireplaces, is scheduled for sale at the Baltimore County Courthouse with an outstanding mortgage debt of $3.25 million, court records show.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
If an English country squire or a wealthy industrialist of the Gilded Age were to have an in-town home, 106 E. Chase St. would fit the bill to a tee. Built in the 1880s, the detached, three-story Romanesque-style home fits well among the other elegant residences in Mount Vernon. "This house is one-of-a-kind and irreplaceable," said listing agent Julie Canard of Long & Foster Real Estate. "There is no way you could duplicate this, for millions of dollars. " The home's original owner, George Jenkins, was enamored of the skill and craftsmanship of builders who emigrated from Europe.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
In 1936, the owners of Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore built a manor home on more than 54 acres in Howard County that once belonged to the descendants of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. That property at 3925 Folly Quarter Road in Ellicott City is now for sale for $7 million. "I call this one of the prime, principal properties of Howard County, sitting on one of the highest elevations there," said listing agent Creig Northrop, of the Creig Northrop Team of Long & Foster Real Estate.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | April 8, 2010
The Baltimore County mansion known as Cliffeholme, built in the mid-19th century and owned by businessman Stephen A. Geppi, was bought back at a foreclosure sale Thursday by the mortgage lender. A trustee for lender Bank of America bid $2.8 million for the nearly 14,000-square-foot residence on 9 acres in Green Spring Valley. Geppi and his wife, Melinda, who bought the property in 2004 for $4.8 million, defaulted on the loan in February 2009 and owed $3.2 million on the mortgage, according to court documents.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | April 9, 2010
The Baltimore County mansion known as Cliffeholme, built in the mid-19th century and owned by businessman Stephen A. Geppi, was bought back at a foreclosure sale Thursday by the mortgage lender. A trustee for lender Bank of America bid $2.8 million for the nearly 14,000-square-foot residence on 9 acres in Green Spring Valley. Geppi and his wife, Melinda, who bought the property in 2004 for $4.8 million, defaulted on the loan in February 2009 and owed $3.2 million on the mortgage, according to court documents.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday | March 12, 1998
Throughout the month of March, the Mansion Theater is celebrating its fifth anniversary of presenting films and videos. On Monday, Seattle-based Blackchair Productions presents a showcase of foreign short films at 8:30 p.m., followed by a program of videos from the Northern Ireland-based Video Cats at 10 p.m. On Wednesday, the Mansion will present its monthly open screening at 9 p.m., preceded by a program of erotic short films at 7:30 p.m. At 10 p.m., there...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | June 27, 1999
It was one big, happy, family that turned out for the dedication of the Clifton Mansion Tower in Baltimore's Clifton Park. About 40 of the 200 people present were descendants of Johns Hopkins, who bought the Clifton Mansion in 1836 and used it as his summer home.The tower was dedicated to Samuel Hopkins, Johns Hopkins' great-great-nephew, past president and member of the Baltimore City Board of Recreation and Parks, and current board member of Civic Works. Both organizations sponsored the ceremony and reception.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | June 26, 1997
Liriodendron, in Harford County, was the country house built early in this century by Howard Kelly, one of Hopkins Hospital's ++ famous "big four" doctors in the group portrait by John Singer Sargent. The house and grounds are now the property of a private foundation, and this summer the site of an indoor and outdoor sculpture show co-sponsored by Sculptors Incorporated of Baltimore. It features works by 28 artists, including Gagik Aroutiunian, G. David Burch, Paul Glasgow, Irene Jaffe, Marisabella Telleria-Diez, Anita Weiss, John Hayes, Suzanne Fausette, Barbara Han, Jim Paulsen, Tom Supensky and Corinne Elyse.
NEWS
September 3, 2014
I was happy to see Jacques Kelly give the Upton Mansion some much needed attention in "Upton Mansion awaits someone to revive it. " Still, it is unfortunate that Mr. Kelly focuses on Upton's value as a historic house along the lines of Mount Clare or Homewood. There has been a lot of debate in the preservation community about the need for more house museums. Why devote limited resources to yet another monument to Baltimore estate owners, many of whom made their fortunes off slavery or owned slaves?
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
A 17th century land grant formerly known as Planter's Paradise, is now the setting for 2316 Bauernschmidt Drive in Baltimore County. Here, on property once owned by Baltimore philanthropist Enoch Pratt, sits a charming example of a rural frame-and-clapboard mansion designed in the Italianate style. This mansion was built in 1909 by Agnes and Frederick Bauernschmidt, who owned a brewing company in Baltimore, as their summer home just blocks from the Middle River. Now on the market for $995,000, this manor house on three-quarters of an acre showcases a three-sided wrap-around porch with columns that support a four-sided second-story balcony.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
The Guilford mansion that cost a former Towson University president his job is expected to be sold to a private buyer next week, closing a controversial chapter in the college's history. It has been at least six months since the elevator in the 8,000-square-foot home on Greenway has rumbled to life. Guests have not been regaled under the chandelier. The $25,000 multimedia system, with a high-definition television and interactive sound system, hasn't entertained. Now officials are drawing up a contract to be submitted to the Maryland Board of Public Works for a vote Wednesday, authorizing the sale of the house for $1.05 million to an IT professional and his family.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | June 23, 2014
Update June 26, 12:30 p.m.: Representatives for seller Kevin P. Welsh said he is negotiating a private sale and canceled Thursday's auction. Agent Scott Frank declined to disclose the potential buyer before the deal has closed. A Catonsville jeweler seduced by the beauty of a 19 th century mansion is to sell the Owings Mills property at auction this week. Kevin P. Welsh who bought the Trentham Mansion for $535,000 after an auction in 2006, said he has sunk $1.3 million into restoring the elegant stone house, which dates to around 1860.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2014
Annapolis officials know that local homeowners who restore and preserve their historic properties play a vital role in the city's architectural legacy. Bill and Judi Kardash, owners of the circa 1770 Colonial mansion Acton Hall, are some of these top players. They consider themselves the current stewards of the home, which sits on an acre of land on Spa Creek. Acton Hall is a perfect example of Georgian period architecture. The brick home features white trim, multipaned windows and a symmetric front elevation with a recessed center bay, along with well-proportioned wings that are adorned with pediments.
NEWS
By Patti Restivo | April 28, 2014
Nature couldn't have been more gracious Saturday as she beckoned visitors of all ages to the 18th annual Montpelier Festival of Herbs, Tea and the Arts at Montpelier Mansion in South Laurel. "We got very, very lucky with the weather," said Montpelier museum educator Holly Burnham, who organized the festival. Spread across the mansion's lawn under a near-perfect spring sky, more than 40 vendors and craftors offered bath products, fabric art, home and garden products, jewelry, plants and herbs, food and tea for sale.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
If an English country squire or a wealthy industrialist of the Gilded Age were to have an in-town home, 106 E. Chase St. would fit the bill to a tee. Built in the 1880s, the detached, three-story Romanesque-style home fits well among the other elegant residences in Mount Vernon. "This house is one-of-a-kind and irreplaceable," said listing agent Julie Canard of Long & Foster Real Estate. "There is no way you could duplicate this, for millions of dollars. " The home's original owner, George Jenkins, was enamored of the skill and craftsmanship of builders who emigrated from Europe.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2011
A long-neglected mansion on the city's west side has been restored to its 19th-century grandeur so that it can provide a home and hope for homeless women. Dozens of volunteers have adopted rooms in the 8,000-square-foot Victorian, built in 1893 by the owner of a Baltimore tugboat company. They swept away years of abandonment, sanded floors, painted walls, restored stained-glass windows, repaired fireplaces and polished the fixtures. They have rebuilt the kitchen, added new bathrooms and donated linens, handmade quilts and every stick of furniture — save for the few pieces that came with the house.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 9, 2014
The Baltimore City Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation on Tuesday approved a developer's exterior renovation plans for the conversion of an historic former home for unwed mothers into apartments. CHAP voted 6-1 to approve staff recommendations endorsing the renovation of the mansion, the old Florence Crittenton Home for Girls at 3110 Crittenton Place in Hampden. Developer John Brooks wants to convert the house into 14 apartments, plus one in a nearby cottage.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
The 8,000-square-foot Guilford mansion owned by Towson University that provided posh housing for its president - and a headache for the institution - may be back on the market soon. The university is seeking to put the president's house, located in Baltimore and more than four miles from campus, up for sale. The home led to a president's ouster shortly after the university purchased it more than a decade ago, and has cost the university tens of thousands of dollars a year to maintain.
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