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NEWS
June 2, 1996
GAMBLING WITH LIVES is the only way to describe the juggling of shifts and equipment occurring within the Baltimore Fire Department. There's no better example of the need for city government to undergo the necessary streamlining that would allow it to spend its meager resources where they are needed most, providing essential services that ensure the health, safety and welfare of the citizens of Baltimore.No stop-gap revenue measure should deter Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and the City Council from making tough decisions about where tax money would be best spent.
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NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | January 21, 1996
IT TOOK A blizzard to make folks realize government can be important in their daily lives. The failure of our leaders to deal with 30 inches-plus of snow exposed serious flaws in the way local governments deliver services to us.It was worst in the city. Even major routes were left only partially open. A stunning number of neighborhoods were ignored for days. A week later, hundreds of roads remained barely passable. Sidewalks? Forget it. As hard as city employees worked, they didn't have the equipment or the manpower to succeed.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1995
When their parent team, the NHL's Mighty Ducks of Anaheim, made a wholesale raid on their roster last week, it appeared the Bandits might have trouble coming up with a full complement of players for a game that night against Cape Breton. Making matters worse is that the team's hottest goal scorer at the time, Mike Maneluk, called in sick.A quick scramble fixed the situation momentarily, with three players being summoned from Raleigh of the ECHL. The Bandits got goals from five different players while beating Cape Breton, 5-2, on Wednesday.
BUSINESS
November 29, 1995
The Baltimore area is expected to have weak employment growth in the first quarter of next year, according to a survey released yesterday by Manpower Inc., the temporary employment agency."
NEWS
September 11, 1994
Your Government, Your ChoiceAs we get closer to Election Day, many questions have come to mind. Are we the people really informed, know the issues and the referendums that are to be voted upon, know our local, state and federal candidates? . . . I believe that we must become much more informed prior to entering the voting booth if government is to improve.. . . I am a campaign committee chairman for a candidate seeking local office. I have attended political fund-raisers and rallies for many of the candidates and incumbents.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | July 31, 1994
From The Sun July 31-Aug. 6, 1844July 31: In taking down the old Theatre Tavern, adjoining the Holliday Street Theater, the corner stone, which was laid, with considerable ceremony, in 1830, was taken up and the precious contents examined.Aug. 3: Michael Murray was committed to jail, in default of payment of a fine, for persisting in the use of profane language in the office of Justice Tate.From The Sun July 31-Aug. 6, 1894July 31: Large crowds again visited the excursion resorts yesterday.
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Sun Staff Writer | June 21, 1994
For a decade and a half, Maryland has tended to think itself somehow "different" from the rest of the country.At first, through most of the 1980s and especially during the recession that struck the rest of America early in the decade, being different seemed to be good news. The state won national attention for seeming to be "recession-proof" because of its many layers of federal spending, especially defense spending, which seemed fated to grow through fat years and lean.Then, when the slow-motion national recession of the 1990s coincided with the collapse of communism and the end of the Cold War, Maryland's reliance on defense turned from blessing to curse.
SPORTS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Special to The Sun | March 27, 1994
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. -- When looking back at yesterday's lacrosse game against North Carolina, Maryland coach Dick Edell will be thinking about the eight first-half extra-man opportunities.Four that No. 8 North Carolina converted into goals and four that No. 7 Maryland did not as the Tar Heels defeated the Terrapins, 12-7, before 2,000 at Fetzer Field."They hurt a lot," Edell said. "Four for four. So much of playing a man down is heart and desire; we did it in the second half."Trailing 8-2 at halftime, the Terrapins outscored the Tar Heels, 4-1, in the third quarter.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | March 4, 1994
Mount Airy Mayor Gerald Johnson is looking for a few good workers to accompany him to Alexandria, Mo., next month.Mr. Johnson hopes to form a work party to rebuild some of the homes of Alexandria residents destroyed last summer by floods.The mayor is planning to leave Mount Airy on April 15 and spend 10 to 14 days in Alexandria.He's looking for volunteers to donate their motor homes to make the 900-mile trip and to house the workers during their stay."We're looking for people like myself who don't have any particular skills, but who are willing to work," Mr. Johnson said.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | February 20, 1994
Every good political executive understands there are certain services that must be provided to constituents: a decent education system, adequate public safety, regular garbage collection and passable roads. If you fail to deliver on any of these, your political life is in jeopardy.Just ask Kurt Schmoke and Roger Hayden.Mayor Schmoke has blown it (partially, for now) on education and on public safety in Baltimore City. He could be fighting for his political career in 1995.County Executive Hayden has blown it badly on passable roads.
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