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By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2011
Whether to development or disaster, Howard County has lost many of its impressive early farmhouses and manors. But at least one remnant of the landed gentry has not only survived but found new life by changing from a private home to public use. Historic Oakland has been home to families, nursing care residents, two colleges, church services, a museum and offices for the local Red Cross and the developer of Columbia. Now marking its 200th birthday, the estate built by an heir of Maryland's Ridgely family is busier than ever as a multipurpose venue and community meeting place.
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NEWS
By Allison Eatough | June 2, 2014
From the outside, Belmont Manor and Historic Park in Elkridge hasn't changed much. The 68-acre estate is still home to the Georgian-style, stucco-on-brick manor house, built by Caleb Dorsey in 1738. It still has intricate gardens and rolling hills as far as the eye can see. But the house and its surrounding property are subtly evolving. For the first time in its almost 300-year history, Belmont is hosting public environmental and preservation programs. The Woodstock-based Howard County Conservancy began offering programs at the new Belmont Nature Center in May and will continue to do so year-round, says Meg Schumacher Boyd, the conservancy's executive director.
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NEWS
September 30, 1992
There's a rich history to tell about Evergreen Junior, a 96-year-old manor house on the grounds of Loyola College in North Baltimore.Since the early 1920s, the Tudoresque castle has housed the priests and brothers of the Society of Jesus who are on Loyola's faculty. Evergreen Junior is undergoing a thorough renovation. It will be used for academic purposes when it reopens next year.But before Loyola purchased the storied mansion, Evergreen Junior was intended to be the honeymoon "cottage" of Horatio Whitridge Garrett, one of the wealthiest young men in Baltimore.
NEWS
Special to The Aegis | December 10, 2013
Ladew Gardens in Monkton will celebrate Christmas in seasonal resplendence with its annual open house Dec. 13-15, as local floral designers and local garden clubs are invited to decorate the rooms of the circa 1747 Manor House, adorning the walls, tabletops and fireplace mantels in festive holiday splendor. In its 33rd year, Ladew's Christmas Open House, according to the event's organizers, has been called "one of Maryland's most memorable and decorative holiday events. " The Christmas Open House is open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. this Friday, Saturday and Sunday.
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | January 18, 2006
The Howard County Department of Planning and Zoning is asking a developer to revise his plans to build office condominiums next to the historic Woodlawn manor house in Columbia. In a letter to Woodlands LLC, the Subdivision Review Committee raises a number of problems with the plan to erect parking lots and a 74,000-square-foot building on the wooded 5-acre property off Bendix Road. The committee states that "the size and architecture of the new building should be compatible with the existing historic structures."
BUSINESS
By Faith Hayden and Faith Hayden,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 3, 2002
CHAPEL POINT -- St. Thomas Manor at Chapel Point is a Maryland architectural landmark, the earliest surviving Georgian mansion in the state, according to the Historical Society of Charles County. Since it was constructed in 1741, the manor house has been a residence for Jesuits. And it was they who built the adjoining church in 1798, naming it St. Ignatius after St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of their Roman Catholic order, the Society of Jesus. Today, the church and manor house are part of the oldest continuously active Catholic parish in the United States, according to a historical marker at the entrance.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2004
The Belmont Conference Center, a historic Elkridge manor house with an 82-acre estate, is for sale, its owner announced yesterday. After being its steward for more than 20 years, the board of directors of the Washington-based American Chemical Society decided to sell the property because Belmont didn't fit the group's plans. "Having a conference center was not really aligned with our strategic mission" of being the premiere provider of chemical information in the world, said the society's executive director and chief executive officer, Madeleine Jacobs.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2000
ONE OF Howard County's oldest structures, an 18th-century manor house known as Dorsey Hall, will be restored as part of a $3.5 million office center scheduled to open early next year. Howard County Executive James N. Robey joined developers Richard Talkin and Donald Reuwer on Tuesday to break ground for the project, called the Dorsey Hall Manor Executive Offices. The development, at 5100 Dorsey Hall Drive in Columbia, will include the construction of 32,000 square feet of office space in four two-story buildings.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2002
At the end of a milelong, one-lane road lined with trees stands an Elkridge manor house built when Maryland was a colony. It's a metaphorical island in a county where post-1960s architecture dominates, a literal island surrounded by the vast Patapsco Valley State Park. Named for its view, Belmont - "beautiful mountain" - was home to a prominent Howard County family for generations. But unlike some of the county's brick-and-mortar survivors of history, Belmont is as lively today as it ever was. It's a conference and retreat center.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1996
SOTTERLEY Plantation, a nonprofit museum in St. Mary's County that was forced to cut back its visiting hours for lack of funds, has been named one of "America's 11 most endangered historic places."The National Trust for Historic Preservation, which included the property on its annual list of sites considered "at risk" of disappearing, says the attraction cannot survive if it doesn't raise funds for much-needed repairs."The descendant of a slave and the descendant of the man who owned that slave are working together to preserve the site and keep it open to the public," said trust President Richard Moe. "But without new sources of ongoing financial support, this national treasure may no longer be able to teach important lessons."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
In recent weeks, The Baltimore Sun, The New York Times and other newspapers have been carrying advertisements announcing the auction next week of Bohemia Manor Farm, which is perhaps one of Maryland's most historic estates, dating to the 17th century. Augustine Herrman, a Czechoslovakian cartographer who was forced to leave Prague because of religious persecution after the battle of White Mountain during the Thirty Years War, founded the estate in what is now Cecil County. After leaving Prague, he traveled to the Netherlands and then went to work as an envoy for the Dutch West India Co. In 1633, Herrman left the Netherlands and set sail for New Amsterdam, which is now New York City.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2013
Eleanor S. Pope, a homemaker who knew the Jazz Age writer F. Scott Fitzgerald in her childhood, died Sept. 22 of kidney failure at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 90. The daughter of Bayard Turnbull, a noted Baltimore architect, and Margaret Carroll Turnbull, an educator, the former Eleanor Sterett Turnbull was born in Baltimore. Mrs. Pope was raised at Trimbush, her family's 22-acre estate on La Paix Lane, west of York Road and north of Rodgers Forge. Today, outside of the twin stone gates that mark the entrance to the lane, nothing remains of the old manor house that was demolished in 1961.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
Colonial Players' 64th season has been a banquet of stimulating plays, and the season closes this month with a delightful dessert in British playwright Alan Ayckbourn's 1979 farce "Taking Steps. " The show is indeed a comic confection, and seems to have been destined for Colonial Players, presented in-the-round on a single level designed to simulate a three-story Victorian home with attic, bedroom level and living room area. Here, the cast of two couples, a solicitor and a real estate agent continually run up and down imaginary stairs while avoiding each other - all in the span of one night.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
Beyond the verdant crops flourishing in this summer's 100-degree heat and regular rainstorms, a guesthouse from long ago sits near the northeastern edge of the 236-acre property that is home to the Shrine of St. Anthony in western Ellicott City. Carriages once traversed this portion of the scenic land - now bisected by L-shaped Folly Quarter Road and leased out as farmland to the University of Maryland by the Conventual Franciscan Friars - to deliver guests to lively summertime parties at the estate known as Folly Quarter.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2011
Whether to development or disaster, Howard County has lost many of its impressive early farmhouses and manors. But at least one remnant of the landed gentry has not only survived but found new life by changing from a private home to public use. Historic Oakland has been home to families, nursing care residents, two colleges, church services, a museum and offices for the local Red Cross and the developer of Columbia. Now marking its 200th birthday, the estate built by an heir of Maryland's Ridgely family is busier than ever as a multipurpose venue and community meeting place.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | September 20, 2009
Building up to 325 detached homes instead of an Erickson retirement community at historic Doughoregan Manor in Howard County is likely to be a more difficult, slower and less-profitable project for the Carroll family to pursue. The family's new plan, if approved, would divide the remaining 892 acres of the estate in the same way, with development clustered in the northeast corner near Frederick Road and Kiwanis-Wallas Park. The family continues to plan for permanent preservation of the nearly 300-year-old manor house and most of the land, while donating 34 acres to the county for park expansion.
NEWS
November 2, 2003
Bohemia Manor story needed newer photo In regard to the article "Finding Bohemia on the Chesapeake" (Oct. 26): I grew up spending the summers in Hack's Point on the Bohemia River. This is the "small stream" that separated Herman's estate, but you failed to mention its name. Also, I notice that the picture you show was taken in 1954. If this is in fact the "house that stands today" belonging to the Bayard family, why such an old photo? Also if it is, you did not mention the remains of, what we knew as, the original manor house; which lays just to the southeast of today's manor house.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 4, 2004
FORTY-FIVE YEARS ago, after his team won the world championship in sudden death overtime, Arthur Donovan, legendary Baltimore Colt and Falstaff of American football, invested his bonus in a country club without a golf course. But while the Valley Country Club, in the Riderwood area of Baltimore County, might not have had 18 holes and fabulous fairways, it had the grand, 19th-century hilltop manor house and 12 acres of a former dairy farm. With Artie Donovan's winnings from the December 1958 NFL championship, it soon had tennis courts, a snack bar, a clubhouse and the huge swimming pool that more than 400 members, their families and friends still enjoy each summer.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | September 15, 2009
A new plan to build up to 325 detached homes instead of a retirement community at historic Doughoregan Manor in Howard County is being quietly presented to community groups in western Ellicott City. The Carroll family, descendants of the only Catholic signer of the Declaration of Independence, is preparing to take their new plans public early next month before submitting them to the county, said Joseph Rutter, a former county planning director who is acting as developer. The housing would take 12 to 13 years to be completed if approved, and the project would likely produce 171 new county schoolchildren for all grades, Rutter said.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2008
Historic Ellicott City's decorator show house offers a variety of design approaches this year, from traditional Williamsburg-style plates and topiaries, to 1970s-inspired lava lamps, to a family room cabinet featuring a large TV that rises at the push of a button. Giving designers the freedom to show their stuff has always been part of the appeal of the show house, which is in its 24th year. But design chairman Carroll Frey said that because this year's house is 35 years old, the design committee gave people more leeway to take a contemporary approach.
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