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NEWS
September 22, 2005
On September 20, 2005, SYLVESTER MANIGAULT. Friends may call at the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue on Friday after8:30 A.M. where the family will receive friends on Saturday at 11 A.M. followed by funeral service at 11:30 A.M. See: www.marchfh.com
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | January 25, 2009
For the past three years, the local beat-makers at Darkroom Productions have brought national attention to Baltimore's hip-hop scene. Now, the duo of Jamal Roberts, 31, and Juan Donovan Bell, 32, is looking to make waves in the movie business. In early March, Bell will move to Los Angeles and open a film office, where he plans to produce feature films and further incorporate Darkroom Productions tracks onto movie soundtracks. It's a natural progression, Bell said. "The move is elementary, really," said Bell, a Baltimore native who still lives here.
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NEWS
March 12, 2003
On March 11, 2003, KIRKLYN; devoted husband of the late Florence Middleton Manigault. Friends may call at the FAMILY OWNED MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue on Thursday after 11 AM. Family will receive friends on Friday at the Pennsylvania Avenue AME Zion Church, 1128 Pennsylvania Avenue at 11 AM, followed by Funeral Services at 11:30 AM. Interment King Memorial Park. See www.marchfh.com.
NEWS
By Stefen Lovelace and Stefen Lovelace,SUN REPORTER | April 24, 2008
Longtime followers of Dunbar boys basketball still carry the memories of some of the storied program's greatest moments. There was the 1982-83 team that won a mythical national championship and is one of the best high school teams to play in Baltimore, if not the country. Some Poets fans go all the way back to the 1973 Dunbar-DeMatha game at the Baltimore Civic Center that demonstrated just how good basketball was in the city. Three players who went through Dunbar, including former Raven Tommy Polley, believe those memories should be preserved and presented to an audience beyond Baltimore.
NEWS
By STACY PATTON | May 24, 1998
On May 15, my hero died. He was a 6 foot 1 black man with deep, dark eyes and broad, striking facial features. For many years, he was a heroin addict, and he died at 53 of heart failure caused by that addiction.He was also arguably the greatest basketball player who ever lived.But you won't find him in the National Basketball Association Hall of Fame, nor his jersey hanging from the ceiling of any arena. You won't see highlight films or his card in any shoebox collection. Despite what some people might regard as a waste of talent, Earl "The Goat" Manigault left his mark on the streets and playgrounds of Harlem and the rest of New York City, and he gave to basketball what no other player, even the greats like Jordan, Magic, and Chamberlain, could ever give.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | February 28, 1991
The beds lie empty and waiting, blankets folded with military precision. The walls sport fresh paint in cheerful mint green and yellow.All that's missing are the patients.As Crownsville State Hospital prepares for the psychiatric victims of war, a foreboding hangs over the renovated rooms."We just hope the war doesn't last long enough for many soldiers to become patients," said hospital administrator Richmond Manigault.The hospitalis prepared to accommodate up to 90 soldiers suffering from illnesses such as depression, anxiety or schizophrenia, Manigault said.
SPORTS
By Derek Toney and Derek Toney,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 21, 1998
St. Frances coach William Wells said earlier this week that winning another Catholic League championship was important for his team, to silence critics who feel the Panthers can't win without Mark Karcher, last year's All-Metro Player of the Year.The No. 3-ranked Panthers took a big step last night, defeating No. 4 Towson Catholic, 65-53, to win their fourth consecutive regular-season championship before a standing-room only crowd at the University of Baltimore.Shawn Hampton and David Manigault each scored 16 points to lead St. Frances (17-4, 12-2)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | January 25, 2009
For the past three years, the local beat-makers at Darkroom Productions have brought national attention to Baltimore's hip-hop scene. Now, the duo of Jamal Roberts, 31, and Juan Donovan Bell, 32, is looking to make waves in the movie business. In early March, Bell will move to Los Angeles and open a film office, where he plans to produce feature films and further incorporate Darkroom Productions tracks onto movie soundtracks. It's a natural progression, Bell said. "The move is elementary, really," said Bell, a Baltimore native who still lives here.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | January 27, 1998
It takes a nice-sized person to eclipse St. Frances All-Metro forward Shawn Hampton, a sinewy 6 feet 8 and 215 pounds.Yet after almost every game -- "especially the big ones," said Hampton's senior teammate, David Manigault -- Hampton always finds himself in the shadow of his 6-5 former teammate Mark Karcher."
SPORTS
By Derek Toney and Derek Toney,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 9, 1998
Trailing by 10 points in the fourth quarter against Mount St. Joseph yesterday, St. Frances was fading, as were its chances at a fourth straight Catholic League regular-season championship.But the No. 4 Panthers awakened and rallied for a 47-42 victory over the visiting and No. 11 Gaels at the University of Baltimore.Senior center Shawn Hampton led St. Frances (13-4, 8-2) with a game-high 14 points and 16 rebounds. Howard Randall led Mount St. Joseph (17-7, 3-6) with 13 points and Sean Johnson added 12.In the fourth quarter, the backcourt duo of Demetrius Charles and David Manigault carried St. Frances, which pulled within a half-game of first-place Towson Catholic.
NEWS
September 22, 2005
On September 20, 2005, SYLVESTER MANIGAULT. Friends may call at the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue on Friday after8:30 A.M. where the family will receive friends on Saturday at 11 A.M. followed by funeral service at 11:30 A.M. See: www.marchfh.com
NEWS
November 6, 2003
On October 31, 2003, MARY LEE; devoted daughter of the late Kirklyn and Florence Manigault. Friends may call at the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue, on Thursday after 8:30 A.M., where the family will receive friends on Friday at 11:30 A.M., followed by funeral services at 12 noon. See www.marchfh.com
NEWS
By STACY PATTON | May 24, 1998
On May 15, my hero died. He was a 6 foot 1 black man with deep, dark eyes and broad, striking facial features. For many years, he was a heroin addict, and he died at 53 of heart failure caused by that addiction.He was also arguably the greatest basketball player who ever lived.But you won't find him in the National Basketball Association Hall of Fame, nor his jersey hanging from the ceiling of any arena. You won't see highlight films or his card in any shoebox collection. Despite what some people might regard as a waste of talent, Earl "The Goat" Manigault left his mark on the streets and playgrounds of Harlem and the rest of New York City, and he gave to basketball what no other player, even the greats like Jordan, Magic, and Chamberlain, could ever give.
SPORTS
By Derek Toney and Derek Toney,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 21, 1998
St. Frances coach William Wells said earlier this week that winning another Catholic League championship was important for his team, to silence critics who feel the Panthers can't win without Mark Karcher, last year's All-Metro Player of the Year.The No. 3-ranked Panthers took a big step last night, defeating No. 4 Towson Catholic, 65-53, to win their fourth consecutive regular-season championship before a standing-room only crowd at the University of Baltimore.Shawn Hampton and David Manigault each scored 16 points to lead St. Frances (17-4, 12-2)
SPORTS
By Derek Toney and Derek Toney,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 9, 1998
Trailing by 10 points in the fourth quarter against Mount St. Joseph yesterday, St. Frances was fading, as were its chances at a fourth straight Catholic League regular-season championship.But the No. 4 Panthers awakened and rallied for a 47-42 victory over the visiting and No. 11 Gaels at the University of Baltimore.Senior center Shawn Hampton led St. Frances (13-4, 8-2) with a game-high 14 points and 16 rebounds. Howard Randall led Mount St. Joseph (17-7, 3-6) with 13 points and Sean Johnson added 12.In the fourth quarter, the backcourt duo of Demetrius Charles and David Manigault carried St. Frances, which pulled within a half-game of first-place Towson Catholic.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | January 27, 1998
It takes a nice-sized person to eclipse St. Frances All-Metro forward Shawn Hampton, a sinewy 6 feet 8 and 215 pounds.Yet after almost every game -- "especially the big ones," said Hampton's senior teammate, David Manigault -- Hampton always finds himself in the shadow of his 6-5 former teammate Mark Karcher."
NEWS
By Stefen Lovelace and Stefen Lovelace,SUN REPORTER | April 24, 2008
Longtime followers of Dunbar boys basketball still carry the memories of some of the storied program's greatest moments. There was the 1982-83 team that won a mythical national championship and is one of the best high school teams to play in Baltimore, if not the country. Some Poets fans go all the way back to the 1973 Dunbar-DeMatha game at the Baltimore Civic Center that demonstrated just how good basketball was in the city. Three players who went through Dunbar, including former Raven Tommy Polley, believe those memories should be preserved and presented to an audience beyond Baltimore.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | February 28, 1991
The beds lie empty and waiting, blankets folded with military precision. The walls sport fresh paint in cheerful mint green and yellow.All that's missing are the patients.As Crownsville State Hospital prepares for the psychiatric victims of war, a foreboding hangs over the renovated rooms."We just hope the war doesn't last long enough for many soldiers to become patients," said hospital administrator Richmond Manigault.The hospitalis prepared to accommodate up to 90 soldiers suffering from illnesses such as depression, anxiety or schizophrenia, Manigault said.
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