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Manifest Destiny

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By John T. Starr | July 2, 1991
SENATORS Ted Stevens of Alaska and Slade Gorton ofWashington are angry with the Smithsonian Institution, more particularly with the National Museum of American Art, a part of the Smithsonian. They are so angry, in fact, that they have threatened to use their positions on the Senate Appropriations Committee to curtail funds for the Smithsonian.What has riled them is the exhibit, "The West as America: Reinterpreting Images of the Frontier, 1820-1920." As is often John T.Starrthe case in exhibits, there are accompanying texts on the wall commenting on the paintings.
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FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | September 25, 2007
I'M A bagel on a plate full of onion rolls!" So said Barbra Streisand in Funny Girl as Fanny Brice, explaining her unique qualities. I've always thought of Miss Streisand as something more exotic than a bagel (a napoleon on a plate of cheese danish?) but for sure she has stood out, transforming what the world accepts as a leading lady. First there was her success as a unique singer. Then she became a Broadway star almost overnight. Her ascent to the top in films might have been surprising even to her. (OK, maybe not to her. Like Diana Ross and Madonna, she has always had a sense of manifest destiny - a quality not always easy for others who are trying to cope.
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NEWS
By John Young | March 26, 2002
WACO, Texas - One of the victims of the fiscal 2003 BushCheney Corp. budget is federal highway spending, something even fiscal conservatives admit we need. But the supporters of highway funds obviously haven't seen into the future like the administration has. Once all Americans are riding in off-road vehicles, we won't need roads. No need for interstate highways at all. What a savings to taxpayers that will be. It's called the vision thing. That vision, obviously is what motivated the U.S. Senate to skirt new fuel standards for gas-guzzling sport utility vehicles.
NEWS
By John Young | March 26, 2002
WACO, Texas - One of the victims of the fiscal 2003 BushCheney Corp. budget is federal highway spending, something even fiscal conservatives admit we need. But the supporters of highway funds obviously haven't seen into the future like the administration has. Once all Americans are riding in off-road vehicles, we won't need roads. No need for interstate highways at all. What a savings to taxpayers that will be. It's called the vision thing. That vision, obviously is what motivated the U.S. Senate to skirt new fuel standards for gas-guzzling sport utility vehicles.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | September 25, 2007
I'M A bagel on a plate full of onion rolls!" So said Barbra Streisand in Funny Girl as Fanny Brice, explaining her unique qualities. I've always thought of Miss Streisand as something more exotic than a bagel (a napoleon on a plate of cheese danish?) but for sure she has stood out, transforming what the world accepts as a leading lady. First there was her success as a unique singer. Then she became a Broadway star almost overnight. Her ascent to the top in films might have been surprising even to her. (OK, maybe not to her. Like Diana Ross and Madonna, she has always had a sense of manifest destiny - a quality not always easy for others who are trying to cope.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 5, 1994
What do Jay Silverheels, Chuck Conners, Adam West and Mike Mazurki have in common?Let's try this one: What do Ronald Reagan, Henry Fonda, Joel McCrea and James Stewart have in common? You guessed, respectively, fallen one-time TV stars and conservative politics?You are wrong.The answers are: Geronimo and Wyatt Earp.Each of the above, in works of magnificent tackiness (i.e., Mazurki as Geronimo on "F-Troop") or works of magnificent magnificence (Fonda as Earp in John Ford's classic "My Darling Clementine")
NEWS
By George F. Will | January 30, 2000
CANTON, Ohio -- Why are advertisers paying an average of $2 million for 30 seconds of time on today's Super Bowl broadcast to sell stuff to 140 million Americans busy eating, among much else, 3.2 billion potato chips, many of them laden with guacamole made from 8 million pounds of avocados that could cover the football field, including end zones, a foot deep? Because on Sept. 17, 1920 -- fittingly, the anniversary of America's most violent day, the battle of Antietam -- 11 men met here in a Hupmobile showroom to organize what would become the National Football League.
NEWS
By Thomas V. DiBacco | March 7, 1991
IN THE aftermath of the Persian Gulf war, President Bush's "approval rating" in national polling is so high that some people think the Democrats needn't bother to show up in 1992.But don't be so hasty. There's more to being president than running a war. And history shows that splendid handling of foreign policy hasn't always aided incumbent presidents.No president knew that better than John Adams, who finessed an undeclared naval war with France from 1798 to 1800, getting the French to agree to America's most insistent demand, the end of its alliance of 1778.
NEWS
By EIRIK A. T. BLOM | September 13, 1994
Bel Air -- No less of an American icon than kindly old Ben Franklin argued against adopting the bald eagle as a national symbol. Ben was known to be a little quirky, but his reasoning was sound. The bald eagle is a scavenger, fiercer looking than acting, and a bit of a fraud. It is neither bald nor a true eagle. Ben argued for the wild turkey, feathered rather than bottled, a species that is steadfast, resolute and, not to be overlooked, delicious. Sorry Ben, but that turkey won't fly.There is a bird, however, that is the perfect symbol for America, whose every attribute coincides with our greatest strengths and whose history is eerily parallel to our own. Congress should move immediately to replace the bald eagle with the European starling.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1996
Like the land it chronicles, PBS's "The West" is a vast, sprawling, complex, polyglot mass, filled with little bits of everything -- some joyous, some tragic, all fascinating.The series, debuting tomorrow, is a six-night, 12 1/2 -hour commitment of time you owe it to yourself to make.But be forewarned: this latest opus from executive producer Ken Burns (who must have spent a lot of time whispering suggestions into the ear of director Stephen Ives) is not the most uplifting television experience.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2000
In an airy mall in suburban Southern Maryland, a mutiny almost breaks out Saturday afternoon. As teen-age girls everywhere tend to do, the three young and sexy members of the R&B group Destiny's Child are late. It's 2:30 p.m., the scheduled time for an autograph session with fans at St. Charles Town Center in Waldorf. Almost 3,000 people have converged upon the mall, and the crowd is jostling, pushing aside small children to get better views and chanting, "We want Destiny's Child! We want Destiny's Child!"
NEWS
By George F. Will | January 30, 2000
CANTON, Ohio -- Why are advertisers paying an average of $2 million for 30 seconds of time on today's Super Bowl broadcast to sell stuff to 140 million Americans busy eating, among much else, 3.2 billion potato chips, many of them laden with guacamole made from 8 million pounds of avocados that could cover the football field, including end zones, a foot deep? Because on Sept. 17, 1920 -- fittingly, the anniversary of America's most violent day, the battle of Antietam -- 11 men met here in a Hupmobile showroom to organize what would become the National Football League.
NEWS
By Ben Wattenberg | June 11, 1997
TORONTO -- And you thought America had one nice, peaceful neighbor to our north. Wrong. How about three, or four?! Canada may be breaking. After the recent parliamentary elections, the words you hear are ''regionalization,'' ''separation,'' ''splitting apart'' and ''Balkanization.''What you don't hear much about in Canada, or in America, is whether what's going on here is good or bad for the United States. Funny. Here we are, two neighboring transcontinental, democratic, bi-oceanic nations, and we're not paying attention.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1996
Like the land it chronicles, PBS's "The West" is a vast, sprawling, complex, polyglot mass, filled with little bits of everything -- some joyous, some tragic, all fascinating.The series, debuting tomorrow, is a six-night, 12 1/2 -hour commitment of time you owe it to yourself to make.But be forewarned: this latest opus from executive producer Ken Burns (who must have spent a lot of time whispering suggestions into the ear of director Stephen Ives) is not the most uplifting television experience.
NEWS
By EIRIK A. T. BLOM | September 13, 1994
Bel Air -- No less of an American icon than kindly old Ben Franklin argued against adopting the bald eagle as a national symbol. Ben was known to be a little quirky, but his reasoning was sound. The bald eagle is a scavenger, fiercer looking than acting, and a bit of a fraud. It is neither bald nor a true eagle. Ben argued for the wild turkey, feathered rather than bottled, a species that is steadfast, resolute and, not to be overlooked, delicious. Sorry Ben, but that turkey won't fly.There is a bird, however, that is the perfect symbol for America, whose every attribute coincides with our greatest strengths and whose history is eerily parallel to our own. Congress should move immediately to replace the bald eagle with the European starling.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 5, 1994
What do Jay Silverheels, Chuck Conners, Adam West and Mike Mazurki have in common?Let's try this one: What do Ronald Reagan, Henry Fonda, Joel McCrea and James Stewart have in common? You guessed, respectively, fallen one-time TV stars and conservative politics?You are wrong.The answers are: Geronimo and Wyatt Earp.Each of the above, in works of magnificent tackiness (i.e., Mazurki as Geronimo on "F-Troop") or works of magnificent magnificence (Fonda as Earp in John Ford's classic "My Darling Clementine")
NEWS
By Ben Wattenberg | June 11, 1997
TORONTO -- And you thought America had one nice, peaceful neighbor to our north. Wrong. How about three, or four?! Canada may be breaking. After the recent parliamentary elections, the words you hear are ''regionalization,'' ''separation,'' ''splitting apart'' and ''Balkanization.''What you don't hear much about in Canada, or in America, is whether what's going on here is good or bad for the United States. Funny. Here we are, two neighboring transcontinental, democratic, bi-oceanic nations, and we're not paying attention.
NEWS
By Thomas V. DiBacco | March 7, 1991
IN THE aftermath of the Persian Gulf war, President Bush's "approval rating" in national polling is so high that some people think the Democrats needn't bother to show up in 1992.But don't be so hasty. There's more to being president than running a war. And history shows that splendid handling of foreign policy hasn't always aided incumbent presidents.No president knew that better than John Adams, who finessed an undeclared naval war with France from 1798 to 1800, getting the French to agree to America's most insistent demand, the end of its alliance of 1778.
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