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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 12, 1993
As long as there have been poets, painters and artists of all persuasions, there have been social critics to notice that a lot of these creative people are mentally unsound."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2010
Madness vs. genius In ‘The Swan Thieves," author Elizabeth Kostova writes about a gifted painter who is afflicted with bipolar disorder. She made up her story. Kay Redfield Jamison actually lived it. Jamison, a psychiatrist at the John Hopkins University who has chronicled her battle with manic-depressive illness, is scheduled to speak Monday night at the Walters Art Museum on what she hypothesizes is a link between creative genius and the particular form of mental illness characterized by frenzied bursts of energy and near-catatonic lows.
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NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2001
When their office phones rang the other day, two Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine researchers were expecting the routine. Instead, they heard the biggest news of their careers. Kay Redfield Jamison and Geraldine Seydoux were informed they'd each won one of the most prestigious grants in the country: the MacArthur Fellowship. The prize gives each researcher $500,000 over five years to use however she wants. "It was just ... completely out of the blue," said Jamison, a psychologist, teacher and writer on mental health.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Harris and Michael Harris,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 22, 2004
The Best Awful, by Carrie Fisher. Simon & Schuster. 272 pages. $24. Is mental illness funny? Suzanne Vale, the heroine of actress Carrie Fisher's fourth Hollywood novel, says it had better be. Having survived drug abuse and rehab in Fisher's debut, Postcards From the Edge, Suzanne rides the dizzying ups and terrifying downs of bipolar disorder in The Best Awful, emerging to crack jokes at benefits and otherwise comfort the similarly afflicted. Given her history with controlled substances, it's no surprise that Suzanne brings disaster on herself.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff | March 21, 2000
Just how long can Joseph C. Palczynski keep going? The answer, according to some doctors, may be several more days. People can function for extended periods if sleep-deprived, experts say, though they are likely to become more irritable and suspicious. But for someone suffering from bipolar disorder, going days with virtually no sleep can have disastrous consequences. Since the standoff in Dundalk began Friday night, Baltimore County police believe Palczynski has kept going with only occasional naps.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2010
Madness vs. genius In ‘The Swan Thieves," author Elizabeth Kostova writes about a gifted painter who is afflicted with bipolar disorder. She made up her story. Kay Redfield Jamison actually lived it. Jamison, a psychiatrist at the John Hopkins University who has chronicled her battle with manic-depressive illness, is scheduled to speak Monday night at the Walters Art Museum on what she hypothesizes is a link between creative genius and the particular form of mental illness characterized by frenzied bursts of energy and near-catatonic lows.
NEWS
By Gerri Kobren | April 11, 1993
TOUCHED WITH FIRE. Kay Redfield Jamison. Free Press. 370 pages. $24.95 George Gordon, Lord Byron, was born into a family notorious for eccentricity, if not downright insanity. On both sides -- the Gordons and the Byrons -- they were moody, emotionally extravagant, suicidal. Little wonder then that the young Lord Byron was described as having "tumultuous passions" while still at school or that he would write privately of his own periods of deepest grief, his mercurial angers and fear of going mad.His genetic inheritance, his writing and behavior were signs and symptoms of manic-depressive illness, argues Kay Redfield Jamison, a professor of psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, in "Touched With Fire."
NEWS
By Jonathan Alter | February 3, 1993
IN HIS book "Chaos," an account of recent scientific advances, James Gleick writes that "a physicist could not truly understand turbulence or complexity unless he understood pendulums."The same can be said of politics. Bill Clinton's debut certainly looks like chaos.Before his first week was over, official Washington, bolstered by the radio static it interprets as the voice of the people, was already writing him off as a klutz and a naif, Jimmy Carter II Gets Taken to the Cleaners.But beneath the turbulence, as scientists are finding in all complex systems, lies a deeper, stranger sense of order.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Harris and Michael Harris,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 22, 2004
The Best Awful, by Carrie Fisher. Simon & Schuster. 272 pages. $24. Is mental illness funny? Suzanne Vale, the heroine of actress Carrie Fisher's fourth Hollywood novel, says it had better be. Having survived drug abuse and rehab in Fisher's debut, Postcards From the Edge, Suzanne rides the dizzying ups and terrifying downs of bipolar disorder in The Best Awful, emerging to crack jokes at benefits and otherwise comfort the similarly afflicted. Given her history with controlled substances, it's no surprise that Suzanne brings disaster on herself.
NEWS
By Chauncey Mabe and Chauncey Mabe,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | December 4, 1994
Considering the crimes of Adolf Hitler, it is easy to forget that he was a human being.The horror of the Holocaust and the tens of millions who died fighting for or against his ambitions have caused him to be vilified as a madman or a monster. Some Christian writers are convinced he was possessed by Satan.There is comfort in this, for it divides Hitler from the rest of the human race and allows us to dismiss him: He was inhuman; we would never commit such crimes. But this attitude is unhelpful, telling us nothing about what it is that makes a person into such a monster -- thus guaranteeing that it will happen again.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2001
When their office phones rang the other day, two Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine researchers were expecting the routine. Instead, they heard the biggest news of their careers. Kay Redfield Jamison and Geraldine Seydoux were informed they'd each won one of the most prestigious grants in the country: the MacArthur Fellowship. The prize gives each researcher $500,000 over five years to use however she wants. "It was just ... completely out of the blue," said Jamison, a psychologist, teacher and writer on mental health.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,Sun Staff | March 18, 2001
When Mary Whitehead heard that two policemen had been murdered on the Eastern Shore recently, she experienced a familiar feeling: hopelessness. Francis M. Zito, the man charged in the killings, suffers from schizophrenia. For nearly 30 years, Whitehead has struggled to take care of her 60-year-old sister, who also suffers from the brain disorder that can lead to hallucinations and paranoid delusions. Whitehead lives with the fear that her sister could also turn violent. Zito's high-profile case underscores the difficulties faced by thousands of relatives of the mentally ill, many of whom worry that tragedy could be just around the corner.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff | March 21, 2000
Just how long can Joseph C. Palczynski keep going? The answer, according to some doctors, may be several more days. People can function for extended periods if sleep-deprived, experts say, though they are likely to become more irritable and suspicious. But for someone suffering from bipolar disorder, going days with virtually no sleep can have disastrous consequences. Since the standoff in Dundalk began Friday night, Baltimore County police believe Palczynski has kept going with only occasional naps.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1995
WASHINGTON -- She has lived her life dangerously close to the edge, soaring at times to the heights of creativity and pleasure, then crashing precipitously into the depths of despair and madness. More than most, Kay Redfield Jamison, a woman of great accomplishment, knows what it's like to teeter on cliffs of violent, terrifying, uncontrollable emotion.And, more than most, she knows what it feels like to lose your footing and fall."Losing your mind is far and away the most terrifying thing you can experience," Kay Jamison says now, recalling a particularly bad episode of "madness" that occurred in her late 20s. "You are your mind.
NEWS
By Chauncey Mabe and Chauncey Mabe,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | December 4, 1994
Considering the crimes of Adolf Hitler, it is easy to forget that he was a human being.The horror of the Holocaust and the tens of millions who died fighting for or against his ambitions have caused him to be vilified as a madman or a monster. Some Christian writers are convinced he was possessed by Satan.There is comfort in this, for it divides Hitler from the rest of the human race and allows us to dismiss him: He was inhuman; we would never commit such crimes. But this attitude is unhelpful, telling us nothing about what it is that makes a person into such a monster -- thus guaranteeing that it will happen again.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau | October 13, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Six years after the demons of manic depression convinced him he was God and commanded him to leap from a window, presidential health reform adviser Robert Boorstin still wonders "why I have this illness and my fraternal twin doesn't."He may find out when scientists at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions and two other institutions complete a three-year, $2.5 million project to identify the genes believed to be responsible for most manic-depressive illness.Fifty families, including several living in Maryland, will be the focus of the project, which was announced yesterday by the sponsoring Charles A. Dana Foundation, a health and education philanthropy.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | April 28, 1993
Taking the role of C. Auguste Dupin, the fictional detective who solved "The Murders in the Rue Morgue," a Johns Hopkins medical school psychologist has focused her deductive powers on the mystery of Edgar Allan Poe's melancholy and madness.Her solution seems both elegant and obvious: the writer, she says, was probably manic-depressive. And, she says, illness probably inspired his croaking raven, razor-edged pendulum and other gloomy tales of death and mourning.Dr. Kay R. Jamison, speaking yesterday at a Hopkins symposium on mood disorders, argued that Poe is probably one of many writers and artists who have suffered from the ailment, which is marked by wild swings between frenzied, compulsive activity and crippling despair.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau | October 13, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Six years after the demons of manic depression convinced him he was God and commanded him to leap from a window, presidential health reform adviser Robert Boorstin still wonders "why I have this illness and my fraternal twin doesn't."He may find out when scientists at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions and two other institutions complete a three-year, $2.5 million project to identify the genes believed to be responsible for most manic-depressive illness.Fifty families, including several living in Maryland, will be the focus of the project, which was announced yesterday by the sponsoring Charles A. Dana Foundation, a health and education philanthropy.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 12, 1993
As long as there have been poets, painters and artists of all persuasions, there have been social critics to notice that a lot of these creative people are mentally unsound."
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | April 28, 1993
Taking the role of C. Auguste Dupin, the fictional detective who solved "The Murders in the Rue Morgue," a Johns Hopkins medical school psychologist has focused her deductive powers on the mystery of Edgar Allan Poe's melancholy and madness.Her solution seems both elegant and obvious: the writer, she says, was probably manic-depressive. And, she says, illness probably inspired his croaking raven, razor-edged pendulum and other gloomy tales of death and mourning.Dr. Kay R. Jamison, speaking yesterday at a Hopkins symposium on mood disorders, argued that Poe is probably one of many writers and artists who have suffered from the ailment, which is marked by wild swings between frenzied, compulsive activity and crippling despair.
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