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NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | January 6, 2002
BOSTON - There is the moment in Kate & Leopold when the 19th-century hero comes galloping after the 21st-century damsel in distress. He is, mind you, mounted on a white charger that had to be unhitched from a horse carriage. Sitting atop this unlikely steed, Leopold, Duke of Albany circa 1876, literally sweeps Kate, marketing researcher circa 2001, off her feet in the middle of Central Park. He then corners the purse-snatcher and returns the prize to the lady as if it were a handkerchief in a tournament.
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FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | November 24, 1990
I wimped out the other day, I turned on the heat.Every year I try to hold out until after Thanksgiving before firing up the furnace. I fell short this year, only by a few days. Nonetheless, I'm embarrassed that I folded.I regard turning on the heat as a sign of weakness. I certainly don't feel that way about turning on the air-conditioner. As a matter of fact, I rejoice that my house has air conditioning. I regard it as a sign of accomplishment, as proof that we as a species have progressed up from the muck and humidity to Barcaloungers and cool air. I can't wait to turn it on.But turning on the heat is a different matter.
NEWS
By GREGORY P. KANE | September 11, 1991
When we search for the reasons 6-year-old Tiffany Smith wascaught in the crossfire that snuffed out her life, we should not rush to judgment and automatically blame ''drug dealers.'' That was the mistake made in the shooting death last year of Jay Bias Jr. When the facts came out, it transpired that Mr. Bias died as the result of an argument he did everything he could to avoid.The only fact we know in the case of Tiffany Smith is that she died as the result of an argument she had no part in. The argument may have been about drugs.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 14, 2008
It's a safe bet Ta-Nehisi Coates' father no longer thinks he's "a disgrace to the family name." But 16 years ago, that's exactly what Paul Coates told his fourth-oldest son. At the time, Ta-Nehisi was a junior at Polytechnic Institute. It was near the end of the school year. Ta-Nehisi struggled at the elite Baltimore school his first two years there, failing three courses when he was a freshman and three more when he was a sophomore. Ta-Nehisi was given a reprieve - you know, the kind that Baltimore schools Chief Executive Officer Andres Alonso thinks schools like Poly and City College and Western aren't giving to failing students - and allowed to return.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 27, 1995
LIKE JESUS, Robert Eades wept. Standing before a crowd Sunday at First Baptist Church in Annapolis, Eades addressed several of those assembled individually and begged their forgiveness."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 23, 1994
Such an odd couple. One's a working-class mate, a gangling fletch of a man, big-eyed and tumultuous, with a ragged mop of hair and a fund of ready resentments, spitting anger and energy. He could be a Boomtown Rat.The other's a trim and tidy intellectual, under a neat spritz of TV-weatherman's hair, who can discuss Freud and Oedipus as they play across Irish literature, or the nature of dramatic structure in a voice both gentle and exquisite.What a team. Mutt and Jeff? Abbott and Costello?
FEATURES
By Don O'Briant and Don O'Briant,Atlanta Journal and Constitution | August 12, 1993
It's not easy being a boy in the '90s. Two decades of divorce frenzies, absent fathers, changing social attitudes and blurred gender roles have left American males more confused than ever about their self-image.Should they eat quiche? Should they act macho? Or should they wander into the woods to beat drums and hug each other?Time was, boys could look to their fathers or to the movies for role models. In the '50s, Marlon Brando, James Dean and other rebels without a creed helped define a generation's masculinity.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Staff Writer | December 22, 1993
Christmas, 1993. Someone will give me cologne. Just what I needed, I'll say, even though my current bottle of Paul Sebastian has the half-life of plutonium.I don't even know when or why to wear cologne anymore. What, splash a little on for work? My co-workers don't need or care to smell me. We don't have that kind of relationship.The only time cologne meant anything was when we were little. Using cologne years before we shaved or dated was a rite of passage. Around age 13, we started coating our faces with Dad's Old Spice, Jade East or Skin Bracer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,Sun Staff | October 10, 1999
The rabbit broke from the clump of scrub at my father's feet -- a scrambling streak of brown against a grassy backdrop of mottled greens and umber. Startled, my 11-year-old heart leaped, and I froze with a shotgun in my hands.In a smooth arc, my dad drew his .22-caliber revolver from its holster and fired a single shot that caught the rabbit on the fly and sent it tumbling into a heap of stew meat. One shot. At a range of 10 yards. With a pistol, no less."Better to miss than not shoot at all," he said, as he holstered the gun. "You think about it too long, and the chance will be gone."
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | October 15, 1999
Fight Club," David Fincher's explosively violent and compulsively watchable rumination on the emasculated state of modern manhood, wants men to know that it feels their pain.Combining the chicly distressed look and brutality of Fincher's "Seven" with the head trips of his next film, "The Game," "Fight Club" just might be a tentative foray into maturity on the part of the MTV-trained director. He has made a clever and surprisingly nuanced meditation on the clash of economics, consumer fetishism and ritual tribal aggression -- think of Susan Faludi's "Stiffed" on steroids.
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