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By LEONARD PITTS Jr | March 15, 1995
Miami. -- Mike Tyson scowled from behind the iron bars, his face tight with menace. You got the sense that your safety was an illusion, your faith in the power of iron sorely misplaced. ''I'll be back,'' he said. You shuddered and had no doubt that he would.That T-shirt seemed to be selling at a brisk pace when I saw it on a street vendor's table in Harlem a couple of years ago. Most of the buyers, not surprisingly, were young, black and male.Now the T-shirt's prophecy is about to come true.
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NEWS
November 14, 2012
Joshua Shoemaker's letter to the editor ("Time to afford all a 'fair chance,'" Nov. 12) quotes Abraham Lincoln explaining how the role of government is "to elevate the condition of men - to lift artificial weights from all shoulders - to clear the paths of laudable pursuit for all - to afford all an unfettered start, and a fair chance, in the race of life. " President Lincoln's eloquence and humanity are hauntingly echoed by another man for the ages and master of the language who said, "We want to draw a line below which we will not allow persons to live and labor, yet above which they may compete with all the strength of their manhood.
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NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | July 28, 1993
PLEASE deliver a message from me to all those young men involved in stealing cars," Myra Green said. "Tell them to find something more constructive to do with their time."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 16, 2010
Mick Benham and his friends were supposed to be roughing it this weekend - just a campfire and a couple of tents high up on a Pennsylvania mountain. "It's testing your manhood, that kind of thing," he says of the yearly winter camping trips. But there's testing your manhood and then there's testing your manhood. Benham can handle no running water and below-freezing temperatures, but missing tonight's Ravens playoff game is one sacrifice that he's not willing to make. "I'll have my Ravens flag flying high upon the mountaintop Saturday," the 29-year-old computer technician promises, even if that means roughing it a little less than tradition would normally dictate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gary Dorsey and By Gary Dorsey,Sun Staff | September 1, 2002
The Everlasting Stream: A True Story of Rabbits, Guns, Friendship, and Family, By Walt Harrington. Atlantic Monthly Press. 192 pages. $23. Walt Harrington was an effete Washington Post reporter shamelessly driven to manicures, Sokol Blosser Pinot Noir, $700 Tallia suits, fine art and antique collectibles. He was an apparent newsroom toady and know-it-all. A man of ample ambitions and certain talent. The story of how he managed to transcend his paltry manhood through rabbit hunting with his working class father-in-law could either be a comic romp or sentimental rubbish.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 19, 2002
IT WASN'T that a young man had been killed that made me stop. The unfortunate truth, after all, is that young men are frequently killed. So, in itself, the shooting of 20-year-old Ibrahim Khoury in Coral Gables, Fla., seemed sadly ... ordinary. No, the thing that demanded a double take was the professed reason he was killed. According to a story published Feb. 6 in The Miami Herald, Mr. Khoury was an altar boy and engineering student who dealt pot on the side. Miami-Dade police say he and his cousin, George Khoury, had the misfortune to encounter three prospective customers, all teen-agers, who had no intention of paying.
NEWS
By Joseph Coates and Joseph Coates,Chicago Tribune | May 16, 1993
AMERICAN MANHOOD. E. Anthony Rotundo.Basic Books. 382 pages. $25. When the Declaration of Independence asserted that all men were created equal, it failed to foresee that the new nation it brought into being would also re-create them -- not always equally -- every generation or so, as times changed and new needs arose.Historian E. Anthony Rotundo shows this truth to have been especially self-evident in sexual politics throughout American history. "Manliness is a human invention," he says.
NEWS
By Diane Winston | July 14, 1991
DURHAM, N.C. -- St. Philip's is the type of church where worshipers expect something historic to happen. A narrow, Neo-Gothic sanctuary with lustrous stained glass windows, hard wood pews and outsized stone columns, it's the perfect setting for the proper Episcopal parish.It is here that "Rite 13: A Celebration of the Gift and Challenge of Womanhood and Manhood" has taken place several times. On a warm spring morning, the knowledge of another occasion stirs the sultry air with anticipation.
NEWS
By H.B. Johnson | September 23, 1992
LISTEN, man, killing a man won't cool you off. Crushing a skull or slitting a throat won't make you a man or bring you any cool comfort. Not if you're sane.So listen:Before you commit an act you think makes you a man, an act you think marks you clearly in the minds of those who question your manhood, consider two things. First, you are searching for something you will never be able to identify if you think foolish acts of fear-thickened violence have anything to do with what manhood is about.
NEWS
November 14, 2012
Joshua Shoemaker's letter to the editor ("Time to afford all a 'fair chance,'" Nov. 12) quotes Abraham Lincoln explaining how the role of government is "to elevate the condition of men - to lift artificial weights from all shoulders - to clear the paths of laudable pursuit for all - to afford all an unfettered start, and a fair chance, in the race of life. " President Lincoln's eloquence and humanity are hauntingly echoed by another man for the ages and master of the language who said, "We want to draw a line below which we will not allow persons to live and labor, yet above which they may compete with all the strength of their manhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 15, 2010
Mick Benham and his friends were supposed to be roughing it this weekend -- just a campfire and a couple of tents high up on a Pennsylvania mountain. "It's testing your manhood, that kind of thing," he says of the yearly winter camping trips. But there's testing your manhood and then there's testing your manhood. Benham can handle no running water and below-freezing temperatures, but missing Saturday's Ravens playoff game is one sacrifice that he's not willing to make. Benham is one of dozens, if not hundreds, of Ravens fans tweaking their Saturday night plans so they'll be able to follow the game.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 14, 2008
It's a safe bet Ta-Nehisi Coates' father no longer thinks he's "a disgrace to the family name." But 16 years ago, that's exactly what Paul Coates told his fourth-oldest son. At the time, Ta-Nehisi was a junior at Polytechnic Institute. It was near the end of the school year. Ta-Nehisi struggled at the elite Baltimore school his first two years there, failing three courses when he was a freshman and three more when he was a sophomore. Ta-Nehisi was given a reprieve - you know, the kind that Baltimore schools Chief Executive Officer Andres Alonso thinks schools like Poly and City College and Western aren't giving to failing students - and allowed to return.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gary Dorsey and By Gary Dorsey,Sun Staff | September 1, 2002
The Everlasting Stream: A True Story of Rabbits, Guns, Friendship, and Family, By Walt Harrington. Atlantic Monthly Press. 192 pages. $23. Walt Harrington was an effete Washington Post reporter shamelessly driven to manicures, Sokol Blosser Pinot Noir, $700 Tallia suits, fine art and antique collectibles. He was an apparent newsroom toady and know-it-all. A man of ample ambitions and certain talent. The story of how he managed to transcend his paltry manhood through rabbit hunting with his working class father-in-law could either be a comic romp or sentimental rubbish.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 19, 2002
IT WASN'T that a young man had been killed that made me stop. The unfortunate truth, after all, is that young men are frequently killed. So, in itself, the shooting of 20-year-old Ibrahim Khoury in Coral Gables, Fla., seemed sadly ... ordinary. No, the thing that demanded a double take was the professed reason he was killed. According to a story published Feb. 6 in The Miami Herald, Mr. Khoury was an altar boy and engineering student who dealt pot on the side. Miami-Dade police say he and his cousin, George Khoury, had the misfortune to encounter three prospective customers, all teen-agers, who had no intention of paying.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | January 6, 2002
BOSTON - There is the moment in Kate & Leopold when the 19th-century hero comes galloping after the 21st-century damsel in distress. He is, mind you, mounted on a white charger that had to be unhitched from a horse carriage. Sitting atop this unlikely steed, Leopold, Duke of Albany circa 1876, literally sweeps Kate, marketing researcher circa 2001, off her feet in the middle of Central Park. He then corners the purse-snatcher and returns the prize to the lady as if it were a handkerchief in a tournament.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | October 28, 2001
In recent years, America's culture wars have pivoted significantly on queers. Sept. 11 found Rev. Jerry Falwell, and his compatriot Rev. Pat Robertson, leader of the Christian Coalition, lamenting on the nationally televised 700 Club that God's wrath over lesbians and gays and their "alternative lifestyle" had brought about the attacks. Gay men and lesbians may be here and queer, but it's clear from the rise in hate crimes and rush to pass legislation outlawing queer marriages, adoptions and induction into the military, that most Americans simply can't get used to it. A spate of recent books examine the roots of homophobia, explore the queer civil rights movement and elucidate just how much U.S. popular culture has a decidedly queer edge.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 3, 1992
The president of the United States went to San Antonio last week to talk about winning the war against drugs. Bad move. He should have come to Baltimore to learn how we're losing it.In San Antonio, where the president met with Latin American leaders, he offered much grand talk of stopping drugs at the border and ridding the American cities of this modern plague.Such humor! Such levity!Such empty talk.Did the president of the United States think no one was paying attention?In Baltimore, the president could have sat in Judge John Hargrove's courtroom at the U.S. Court House on Lombard Street, and heard talk of amoral men swallowing heroin in balloons, and imaginary voodoo witch doctors improving your manhood, and he'd have realized a simple truth he has never been frank enough to mention in public:In the great American war on drugs, drugs are winning.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | June 21, 1991
LONDON -- These are tough times for the pride of British manhood.France's new female prime minister thinks men on this side of the Channel are not interested in women. Indeed, she has even suggested that one in four may be gay.This has touched a sensitive nerve in a country whose men endured for years the image-sapping success of one of the London stage's longest-running farces -- "No Sex, Please, We're British."If all this were not enough to make the Englishman's stiff upper lip quiver, the current British edition of Esquire magazine reports that Englishwomen regard their partners' romantic "repertoire" as "hopeless."
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | October 15, 1999
Fight Club," David Fincher's explosively violent and compulsively watchable rumination on the emasculated state of modern manhood, wants men to know that it feels their pain.Combining the chicly distressed look and brutality of Fincher's "Seven" with the head trips of his next film, "The Game," "Fight Club" just might be a tentative foray into maturity on the part of the MTV-trained director. He has made a clever and surprisingly nuanced meditation on the clash of economics, consumer fetishism and ritual tribal aggression -- think of Susan Faludi's "Stiffed" on steroids.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,Sun Staff | October 10, 1999
The rabbit broke from the clump of scrub at my father's feet -- a scrambling streak of brown against a grassy backdrop of mottled greens and umber. Startled, my 11-year-old heart leaped, and I froze with a shotgun in my hands.In a smooth arc, my dad drew his .22-caliber revolver from its holster and fired a single shot that caught the rabbit on the fly and sent it tumbling into a heap of stew meat. One shot. At a range of 10 yards. With a pistol, no less."Better to miss than not shoot at all," he said, as he holstered the gun. "You think about it too long, and the chance will be gone."
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