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NEWS
By Kate Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
Despite weighing more than 100 pounds, manhole covers are worth less than $10 to Baltimore scrap metal dealers — if they are even willing to take them. Even so, the city discovered 17 of them missing Tuesday in Baltimore's largest manhole-cover theft in four years, the Department of Public Works said. Kurt Kocher, the department's spokesman, suspected that whoever took them was looking to sell them as scrap. "What else could you do with it?" Kocher said. The cast-iron covers were stolen from patches of grass on East Lombard Street near an industrial area.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
SAK Construction, LLC which specializes in the repair of aging water and sewer pipes and has boomed as municipal systems reach their limit, has opened a new regional headquarters in Arbutus. The Missouri company, founded in 2006, won contracts last year to do work on the systems in Baltimore City and in Prince George's and Montgomery counties, Chief Information Officer Jim Kalishman said. The Arbutus center, a 7.5-acre site at 1405 Benson Court, will house the regional headquarters for SAK, which anticipates announcing tens of millions of East Coast contracts in the coming months, Kalishman said.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
More than 240,000 gallons of sewage has spilled in Gunpowder Falls State Park as of Monday afternoon after someone vandalized a manhole, Baltimore County public works officials say. Officials said the sewer overflow was discovered Sunday afternoon near Jennifer Branch - a tributary to the Gunpowder Falls - in a heavily wooded area of the park that is east of Harford Road and south of Gunpowder Falls. A resident alerted the county to the problem, officials said. Crews have been working to contain the overflow, but the waste is being discharged at a rate of about 10,000 gallons per hour, according to the public works department.
NEWS
December 5, 2013
Aberdeen Students and staff at George D. Lisby Elementary School at Hillsdale were evacuated from the school Monday afternoon after a dishwasher overheated. The dishwasher in the kitchen of the Aberdeen school sustained fire damage, but it was contained to the machine, according to Teri Kranefeld, manager of communications for Harford County Public Schools. The students and staff were able to get out of the building safely and then returned once fire officials determined it was safe.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2010
The city's Department of Public Works was forced to replace 16 missing manhole covers from East Lombard Street after they were stolen earlier this week, officials said. The manhole covers, ranging from 12 to 30 inches in diameter, were taken from the 5900 to 6300 blocks of East Lombard, department of public works officials said. They were reported missing before noon on Tuesday. Anyone with information on the missing manhole covers is asked to call 911. jkanderson@baltsun.com
NEWS
November 11, 1990
Manhole frame and cover replacements will take place in the Shadyside/Deale area through May 1, 1991, between 8:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m.The work consists of excavation around manholes to facilitate the removal and replacement of the frame and cover assembly on 100 manholes in the area. Work will be performed by Paul's Utility Company of Bel Air.The work will replace manhole covers that allow excessive amounts of rainwater into the wastewater collection system. This will reduce the impact of storms on the collection system and reclamation facility.
NEWS
March 1, 1996
Eight aluminum manhole covers for underground tanks were stolen from two Pasadena gas stations between 8 p.m. Tuesday and 5 a.m. Wednesday, county police said yesterday.Employees at an Amoco station and a Texaco station in the 300 block of Mountain Road called police separately about 11 a.m. Wednesday to report the thefts, police said.Rick Hoph of the Texaco station told police that he notified local recycling centers of the thefts and asked them to watch for anyone trying to recycle the items, which require no tools to remove and are valued at $50 each.
NEWS
By LAURA BARNHARDT and LAURA BARNHARDT,SUN STAFF WRITER | August 18, 2006
The two construction workers who died after losing consciousness in a sewer manhole Wednesday evening at Villa Julie College's Owings Mills campus were identified yesterday by Baltimore County police, while state occupational safety officials tried to determine what caused their deaths. Cesar Salazar, 22, of the 300 block of Middle Grove Court in Westminster went into the manhole first, apparently to retrieve a tool, and lost consciousness, according to state and local authorities. A second worker, Craig Michael Gouker, 47, of the 1000 block of Old Westminster Road in Hanover, Pa., went in the 15-foot hole to attempt to rescue Salazar but also lost consciousness, officials said.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2003
With both ends of the Howard Street Tunnel blocked by thick, blinding smoke from an underground train derailment two years ago, a downtown manhole became firefighters' most direct access to the burning rail cars. That day - July 18, 2001 - was one of the city's greatest emergencies, and now a new, specially designed cast-iron cover for the manhole at Howard and Lombard streets, to be dedicated at 3 p.m. today, will ensure that it is remembered. "I think for a long time people will remember that event," Mayor Martin O'Malley said yesterday.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 13, 2001
A Howard County Detention Center inmate on work-release in Landover died yesterday after he lost consciousness while trying to turn on water for a series of buildings, according to Howard County government and Prince George's County fire officials. Frederick Duffy Coonradt, 40, had been serving a 180-day sentence for violating probation on a charge of driving while intoxicated, according to a news release. He was on a job site about 10:30 a.m. with Associates Plumbing of Laurel, a company for which he had worked for three years, when he went down a 10-foot manhole to turn the water back on for some buildings in the 1200 block of Capital View Drive, according to officials in both counties.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
More than 240,000 gallons of sewage has spilled in Gunpowder Falls State Park as of Monday afternoon after someone vandalized a manhole, Baltimore County public works officials say. Officials said the sewer overflow was discovered Sunday afternoon near Jennifer Branch - a tributary to the Gunpowder Falls - in a heavily wooded area of the park that is east of Harford Road and south of Gunpowder Falls. A resident alerted the county to the problem, officials said. Crews have been working to contain the overflow, but the waste is being discharged at a rate of about 10,000 gallons per hour, according to the public works department.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore sun | February 24, 2012
And the hits keep coming ... Yesterday, I wrote about complaints lodged by members of Sarah Palin's Alaska posse against HBO's "Game Change," a film about the 2008 GOP presidential campaign that is scheduled to premiere March 10. You should know that none of the people lodging the complaints, including columnists at Big Hollywood, have seen the film. They are basing their criticism on a HBO trailer for the docudrama -- and making wild leaps of speculation based on a couple of minutes of videotape.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2011
This week, Watchdog brings you updates on some previously unresolved problems. Update: A bench has been replaced at a Randallstown bus stop. Roslyn DeGraffinreid called to thank Watchdog last month because a broken wooden bench in the 9100 block of Liberty Road has been replaced. DeGraffinreid works nearby and waits for the bus at that stop after tiring shifts at a nursing home. "You all called the right people and now it's fixed so we can get to sit down," she said in a message to Watchdog.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
The problem: A manhole cover in East Baltimore bangs every time cars drive over it. The back story: City residents endure cacophony as part of their daily routine. The wail of sirens, the clatter of helicopters overhead and the zoom of motorcycles whizzing past are part of the daily chorus in many neighborhoods, including Washington Hill, a few blocks south of Johns Hopkins Hospital in East Baltimore. But Joseph Thomas called about a particularly noisy element — a manhole cover at Baltimore and Wolfe streets that bangs when hit by vehicles.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2011
The problem: A leak in Northeast Baltimore leaves inches of ice on Belair Road. The back story: Eugene Byrnes was worried about the babies. He lives about a block from the intersection of Belair Road and Woodlea Avenue in Northeast Baltimore, and for weeks, Byrnes has witnessed people struggling across the ice that has become a regular feature of the northwest corner on cold days. "The bus gets in there to load and unload passengers and has trouble getting out," Byrnes said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2010
Baltimore County officials estimate about 15,000 gallons of untreated sewage spilled into the creek that flows into Bird and Gunpowder rivers this week. The sewage leaked from a damaged 8-inch sewer line that was damaged by recent heavy rains and a dislodged sewer manhole near White Marsh Run. County utility crews completed temporary repairs Tuesday and have restored normal flow in the line. The county has posted signs advising residents to avoid contact with the waters of White Marsh Run and Bird River in the Silver Hill Farm West area in the eastern part of the county.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2001
A flammable chemical that mysteriously appeared in Inner Harbor sewers - and may have been the cause of a manhole cover explosion Aug. 11 - came from the CSX Corp. train that derailed and caught fire three weeks earlier, the state said yesterday. An independent laboratory has confirmed that the tripropylene found in underground storm drains matched that carried in one tanker of the 60-car freight train that derailed under Howard Street on July 18, according to the Department of the Environment.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | June 25, 1992
EDGEWATER -- Gasoline poured into a sewer system is believed to have caused an underground explosion that blew apart a manhole cover and forced 15 families from their homes early yesterday.Capt. Gary Sheckells, a spokesman for the Anne Arundel County Fire Department, said residents of the Londontown area heard the explosion about 4:40 a.m. The first call to the Fire Department didn't come until 5:30 a.m., however, when a man backing his car out of a driveway in the 1400 block of Oak Bluff Road ran over an open manhole.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2010
Firefighters blocked the intersection of High and Fawn streets in Little Italy Sunday morning after a fire broke out in an underground conduit. The fire was discovered at about 6 a.m., Fire Capt. Paul Demme said. Witnesses said flames could be seen rising from a manhole. No one was injured, Demme said. The cause remains under investigation.
NEWS
By Kate Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
Despite weighing more than 100 pounds, manhole covers are worth less than $10 to Baltimore scrap metal dealers — if they are even willing to take them. Even so, the city discovered 17 of them missing Tuesday in Baltimore's largest manhole-cover theft in four years, the Department of Public Works said. Kurt Kocher, the department's spokesman, suspected that whoever took them was looking to sell them as scrap. "What else could you do with it?" Kocher said. The cast-iron covers were stolen from patches of grass on East Lombard Street near an industrial area.
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