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By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | September 16, 1990
ULUNDI, South Africa -- Mangosuthu Buthelezi becomes visibly annoyed at the suggestion that he might enhance his stature by rubbing shoulders with Nelson Mandela.He waves his arms. He locks his fingers and twiddles his thumbs. He twists around in his chair. And he dismisses the suggestion with colorful terms like "balder--," "rubbish" and "crap."Mr. Buthelezi is a prince of the Zulu tribe, which once reigned supreme in southern Africa, and he speaks proudly of the "warrior blood in our veins."
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NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | September 21, 1994
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- A growing rift between the two leading Zulu figures in South Africa reached the breaking point yesterday when King Goodwill Zwelithini cut off contact with Inkatha Freedom Party President Mangosuthu Buthelezi -- ostensibly over the minor matter of who should be allowed to issue an invitation.Mr. Buthelezi expressed indignation last month when President Nelson Mandela, Mr. Buthelezi's long-time political rival, said that he had accepted an invitation from the king to attend the Zulus' Shaka Day celebrations on Saturday.
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NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | October 11, 1992
DURBAN, South Africa -- In the turbulent world of South African politics, Mangosuthu Buthelezi is making his last stand, and he is summoning his tribe's ancient warrior tradition to the task.Chief Buthelezi, this country's most prominent Zulu leader, is relying on the ethnic pride of the nation's Zulus to wage a life-and-death struggle with the African National Congress, which has displaced the Zulu kingdom as the most formidable black force in South Africa.Inkatha is considered a conservative black organization, which promotes free enterprise, while the ANC has a large number of communists in its ranks.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | April 1, 1994
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Reacting to the growing violence threatening South Africa's first multiracial elections, President F. W. de Klerk announced a state of emergency and ordered the army into the riotous KwaZulu-Natal region yesterday.A government spokesman, Richard Carter, said the deployment had begun last night.The deployment is designed to ensure that people in the region will be able to vote despite the resistance of the area's primary political figure, Mangosuthu Buthelezi, leader of the Inkatha Freedom Party.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | April 1, 1994
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Reacting to the growing violence threatening South Africa's first multiracial elections, President F. W. de Klerk announced a state of emergency and ordered the army into the riotous KwaZulu-Natal region yesterday.A government spokesman, Richard Carter, said the deployment had begun last night.The deployment is designed to ensure that people in the region will be able to vote despite the resistance of the area's primary political figure, Mangosuthu Buthelezi, leader of the Inkatha Freedom Party.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | September 21, 1994
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- A growing rift between the two leading Zulu figures in South Africa reached the breaking point yesterday when King Goodwill Zwelithini cut off contact with Inkatha Freedom Party President Mangosuthu Buthelezi -- ostensibly over the minor matter of who should be allowed to issue an invitation.Mr. Buthelezi expressed indignation last month when President Nelson Mandela, Mr. Buthelezi's long-time political rival, said that he had accepted an invitation from the king to attend the Zulus' Shaka Day celebrations on Saturday.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | March 31, 1994
ULUNDI, South Africa -- Mangosuthu Buthelezi -- the Zulu chief who opposed both apartheid and trade sanctions -- was once praised as the black who would save South Africa from communist domination. Now he is denounced as the obstructionist who could drag it into civil war.The four weeks remaining between now and South Africa's first multiracial elections will tell whether he is reduced to a historical footnote. He and his Inkatha Freedom Party are boycotting the vote, certain to be won by his avowed enemy, Nelson Mandela's African National Congress (ANC)
NEWS
February 5, 1991
It is a time of change and hope for South Africa. Last week's peace-seeking meeting between rival black leaders Nelson Mandela of the African National Congress and Zulu Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi was followed by President F.W. de Klerk's dramatic call for the repeal of all major laws enforcing apartheid, the country's system of rigid racial discrimination.In opening a new session of Parliament De Klerk announced that the government wants to end the country's system of segregated residential areas and regulations limiting land ownership by race.
NEWS
By Newsday | September 21, 1990
APARTHEID will be the victor in South Africa if the factional fighting between blacks that has left 800 dead in six weeks doesn't end.Those who are best able to help stop the violence -- President Frederik W. De Klerk, African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela and Mangosuthu Buthelezi, chief of the Zulu people and head of its political arm, Inkatha -- must do so quickly.In the black fratricide between the warring Zulus and Xhosas, who are aligned with the ANC, there is evidence that security forces of the de Klerk-led government have, at the very least, been guilty of complicity -- siding with the conservative Inkatha group against the ANC. De Klerk must give better assurances that his security forces aren't instigating the fighting between blacks.
NEWS
February 1, 1991
Despite war in the Persian Gulf, in South Africa this week there was progress toward peace. After a day-long meeting on Tuesday, African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela and Zulu Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi announced a major breakthrough toward ending a split that in recent years has turned violent and deadly. Since 1986, fighting between rival factions of South Africa's black community has claimed as many as 5,000 lives.The meeting, the first between the two leaders in almost three decades, may not immediately end the vicious rivalry between the followers of the two men. But the cordial atmosphere of the meeting and the two men's acknowledgment that their differences had been fully addressed without acrimony are reasons to hope that the healing process has truly begun.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | March 31, 1994
ULUNDI, South Africa -- Mangosuthu Buthelezi -- the Zulu chief who opposed both apartheid and trade sanctions -- was once praised as the black who would save South Africa from communist domination. Now he is denounced as the obstructionist who could drag it into civil war.The four weeks remaining between now and South Africa's first multiracial elections will tell whether he is reduced to a historical footnote. He and his Inkatha Freedom Party are boycotting the vote, certain to be won by his avowed enemy, Nelson Mandela's African National Congress (ANC)
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | October 11, 1992
DURBAN, South Africa -- In the turbulent world of South African politics, Mangosuthu Buthelezi is making his last stand, and he is summoning his tribe's ancient warrior tradition to the task.Chief Buthelezi, this country's most prominent Zulu leader, is relying on the ethnic pride of the nation's Zulus to wage a life-and-death struggle with the African National Congress, which has displaced the Zulu kingdom as the most formidable black force in South Africa.Inkatha is considered a conservative black organization, which promotes free enterprise, while the ANC has a large number of communists in its ranks.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | September 16, 1990
ULUNDI, South Africa -- Mangosuthu Buthelezi becomes visibly annoyed at the suggestion that he might enhance his stature by rubbing shoulders with Nelson Mandela.He waves his arms. He locks his fingers and twiddles his thumbs. He twists around in his chair. And he dismisses the suggestion with colorful terms like "balder--," "rubbish" and "crap."Mr. Buthelezi is a prince of the Zulu tribe, which once reigned supreme in southern Africa, and he speaks proudly of the "warrior blood in our veins."
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | December 4, 1990
THOKOZA, South Africa -- Tensions between rival black groups erupted in a new round of fighting in this battle-weary township yesterday, resulting in at least 52 deaths during a 24-hour period.Thousands of Thokoza residents fled their homes in a grim replay of scenes from August and September, when more than 800 people died in township clashes in the region around Johannesburg.Police imposed a nighttime curfew on Thokoza and three other townships where violence had flared. They said 71 people were killed in the four townships between Sunday and yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | March 3, 1994
A Soweto branch of the NAACP?That will be one result of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People's first high-level visit to South Africa, says the Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., the civil rights group's executive director.A dozen-member NAACP delegation, headed by Dr. Chavis and board chairman Dr. William F. Gibson, left yesterday and will return March 7. The NAACP is based in Baltimore.The group plans to meet today with Nelson Mandela, the African National Congress leader, who is expected to become president after South Africa's first multiracial election next month.
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