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By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 8, 1998
We were surrounded by white at Mangia, and I don't mean the tablecloths. This sports-themed Italian bistro was full of midshipmen when we visited.It was Parents' Weekend at the Naval Academy, so we saw lots of students and their folks dipping soft bread into the plates of cheese- and pepper-seasoned olive oil that Mangia puts on each table.Owner Pietro Priola has come up with a recipe that appeals to tourists and locals, as well as students: Serve good food at reasonable prices in a congenial atmosphere.
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EXPLORE
By Lisa Kawata | August 31, 2011
First, don't mistake the new Players Bar & Grill for what used to be Mangia's in Waverly Woods Shopping Center. The new upscale bar and grill may occupy the same spot in the strip, but owner Simon Sadoun, general manager Sean Brown and executive chef Doug Jones have transformed the space and menu into a classy sports-themed restaurant with an eclectic variety of dishes, from stuffed avocado appetizers to seafood jambalaya and gourmet desserts almost...
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NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1998
For what it does, Mangia in Annapolis does it well.A somewhat casual eatery, Mangia serves up tasty Italian favorites without much pomp or circumstance.This is OK, because Main Street has more than enough over-the-top restaurants.Mangia, which opened almost a year ago, boasts a charming takeout delicatessen and pizzeria on the first floor, and an old-fashioned wooden bar on the second. Its dark green tablecloths, laminated menus and brick decor add to the laid-back atmosphere.The food, including gourmet pizza, a dozen pasta dishes, veal dinners and seafood dishes, makes a visit worthwhile.
NEWS
By SHEILA YOUNG and SHEILA YOUNG,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 11, 2005
Autumn is a great season for sports, but not so great for women who try to drag their husbands away from the TV for a night out. Think of it as the war between Football Man and Dine-out Woman. Dine-out Woman wants the Rainbow Room in New York with its Fred Astaire dance floor and Cole Porter swing band. Football Man wants a wall-sized TV at home with his La-Z-Boy recliner and Surround Sound. Is compromise possible for such a couple? The Mangia Italian Grill and Sports Cafe tries to find that middle ground, and largely succeeds.
NEWS
By SHEILA YOUNG and SHEILA YOUNG,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 11, 2005
Autumn is a great season for sports, but not so great for women who try to drag their husbands away from the TV for a night out. Think of it as the war between Football Man and Dine-out Woman. Dine-out Woman wants the Rainbow Room in New York with its Fred Astaire dance floor and Cole Porter swing band. Football Man wants a wall-sized TV at home with his La-Z-Boy recliner and Surround Sound. Is compromise possible for such a couple? The Mangia Italian Grill and Sports Cafe tries to find that middle ground, and largely succeeds.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 16, 2003
It may not be a scientific fact, but it seems as if 97 percent of the tourists who go to Annapolis for the day have crab cakes or oysters for lunch, followed by ice cream or cheesecake. For the remaining 3 percent, there are other options. One of them is Mangia, a competent if not outstanding Italian restaurant. Upstairs, Mangia features a cozy, family-friendly restaurant with sports memorabilia adorning the walls, while a carryout counter does a brisk business downstairs. Mangia's best feature may well be its location -- only a few steps away from the City Dock.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | June 21, 2001
Deborah Cogan, an owner of Spoons Coffee House and Roastery at 24 E. Cross St., knows her coffee. The place specializes in organic and shade-grown coffees from small farms, and the beans are roasted on the premises. Serious coffee drinkers should be very happy here, particularly as Spoons earlier this year added breakfast and lunch to the mix. Unlike some coffee shops that have only pastries or bagels, Spoons offers a full breakfast of eggs, pancakes, french toast and the like starting at 7 a.m. every day. Lunch at the moment consists only of five sandwiches; but panini, soup and salads are soon to be added to the menu.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2001
The common wisdom is that people move to Howard County for the schools - though they don't normally bring a restaurant with them. But when Pietro "Pete" and Donna Priola moved to western Howard from Anne Arundel County with their five school-age children last winter, they decided to open an Italian restaurant nearby - just like the two they have owned for years in Annapolis. So, voila: Mangia Italian Grille and Sports Cafe, the largest retail tenant besides the supermarket in the still partly unoccupied Waverly Woods Village Center.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1997
Ten years ago, Annapolis was known largely as a place to sail, a place to stroll and, occasionally, a place to eat.But to look at Main Street now, lined with Indian, Japanese, Chinese and continental restaurants, packed with tourists staring at lengthy menus, all that has changed. Annapolis has become known as a great place to eat.Once a town of bar food, residents and restaurants owners say, Annapolis has become a town of cuisine. A lot of cuisine."Downtown restaurants are thriving right now," said Robert Youngblood, executive director of the Annapolis Chamber of Commerce, "and there appears to be enough business to go around."
EXPLORE
By Lisa Kawata | August 31, 2011
First, don't mistake the new Players Bar & Grill for what used to be Mangia's in Waverly Woods Shopping Center. The new upscale bar and grill may occupy the same spot in the strip, but owner Simon Sadoun, general manager Sean Brown and executive chef Doug Jones have transformed the space and menu into a classy sports-themed restaurant with an eclectic variety of dishes, from stuffed avocado appetizers to seafood jambalaya and gourmet desserts almost...
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 16, 2003
It may not be a scientific fact, but it seems as if 97 percent of the tourists who go to Annapolis for the day have crab cakes or oysters for lunch, followed by ice cream or cheesecake. For the remaining 3 percent, there are other options. One of them is Mangia, a competent if not outstanding Italian restaurant. Upstairs, Mangia features a cozy, family-friendly restaurant with sports memorabilia adorning the walls, while a carryout counter does a brisk business downstairs. Mangia's best feature may well be its location -- only a few steps away from the City Dock.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | January 6, 2002
This summer Mangia Mangia, only 3 years old, changed owners -- an event that made less difference than you might think. It was taken over by Mike Agudelo and John Stamatakos, who knew the Italian bar-restaurant wasn't broke and resisted any impulse to fix it. The new owners have kept the original concept: a simple menu of pastas, pizzas and a few entrees. (I had heard that the new chef was going to add some non-Italian specials, but that hasn't happened yet.) The most unusual thing about the menu is still that you build your own pasta by choosing either linguine or the pasta of the day for $7.95 (this day it was gemelli)
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2001
The common wisdom is that people move to Howard County for the schools - though they don't normally bring a restaurant with them. But when Pietro "Pete" and Donna Priola moved to western Howard from Anne Arundel County with their five school-age children last winter, they decided to open an Italian restaurant nearby - just like the two they have owned for years in Annapolis. So, voila: Mangia Italian Grille and Sports Cafe, the largest retail tenant besides the supermarket in the still partly unoccupied Waverly Woods Village Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | June 21, 2001
Deborah Cogan, an owner of Spoons Coffee House and Roastery at 24 E. Cross St., knows her coffee. The place specializes in organic and shade-grown coffees from small farms, and the beans are roasted on the premises. Serious coffee drinkers should be very happy here, particularly as Spoons earlier this year added breakfast and lunch to the mix. Unlike some coffee shops that have only pastries or bagels, Spoons offers a full breakfast of eggs, pancakes, french toast and the like starting at 7 a.m. every day. Lunch at the moment consists only of five sandwiches; but panini, soup and salads are soon to be added to the menu.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 8, 1998
We were surrounded by white at Mangia, and I don't mean the tablecloths. This sports-themed Italian bistro was full of midshipmen when we visited.It was Parents' Weekend at the Naval Academy, so we saw lots of students and their folks dipping soft bread into the plates of cheese- and pepper-seasoned olive oil that Mangia puts on each table.Owner Pietro Priola has come up with a recipe that appeals to tourists and locals, as well as students: Serve good food at reasonable prices in a congenial atmosphere.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | September 20, 1998
When we arrived outside Mangia Mangia, a mural artist - who for some reason was working at night - was up on a ladder winding spaghetti made of hose around a giant fork. The whole front of Canton's newest Italian restaurant is one glorious mural of food. Too bad there isn't outdoor seating on the other side of the street so diners can enjoy it while they eat.The good news is that the interior of the small bar-restaurant looks fabulous as well. It's funky but clever, with bold use of color, posh little light fixtures, a mosaic of antique doors on the walls, mismatched chairs and tables set with tea towels for napkins.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | September 20, 1998
When we arrived outside Mangia Mangia, a mural artist - who for some reason was working at night - was up on a ladder winding spaghetti made of hose around a giant fork. The whole front of Canton's newest Italian restaurant is one glorious mural of food. Too bad there isn't outdoor seating on the other side of the street so diners can enjoy it while they eat.The good news is that the interior of the small bar-restaurant looks fabulous as well. It's funky but clever, with bold use of color, posh little light fixtures, a mosaic of antique doors on the walls, mismatched chairs and tables set with tea towels for napkins.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | January 6, 2002
This summer Mangia Mangia, only 3 years old, changed owners -- an event that made less difference than you might think. It was taken over by Mike Agudelo and John Stamatakos, who knew the Italian bar-restaurant wasn't broke and resisted any impulse to fix it. The new owners have kept the original concept: a simple menu of pastas, pizzas and a few entrees. (I had heard that the new chef was going to add some non-Italian specials, but that hasn't happened yet.) The most unusual thing about the menu is still that you build your own pasta by choosing either linguine or the pasta of the day for $7.95 (this day it was gemelli)
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1998
For what it does, Mangia in Annapolis does it well.A somewhat casual eatery, Mangia serves up tasty Italian favorites without much pomp or circumstance.This is OK, because Main Street has more than enough over-the-top restaurants.Mangia, which opened almost a year ago, boasts a charming takeout delicatessen and pizzeria on the first floor, and an old-fashioned wooden bar on the second. Its dark green tablecloths, laminated menus and brick decor add to the laid-back atmosphere.The food, including gourmet pizza, a dozen pasta dishes, veal dinners and seafood dishes, makes a visit worthwhile.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1997
Ten years ago, Annapolis was known largely as a place to sail, a place to stroll and, occasionally, a place to eat.But to look at Main Street now, lined with Indian, Japanese, Chinese and continental restaurants, packed with tourists staring at lengthy menus, all that has changed. Annapolis has become known as a great place to eat.Once a town of bar food, residents and restaurants owners say, Annapolis has become a town of cuisine. A lot of cuisine."Downtown restaurants are thriving right now," said Robert Youngblood, executive director of the Annapolis Chamber of Commerce, "and there appears to be enough business to go around."
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