Advertisement
HomeCollectionsManger Square
IN THE NEWS

Manger Square

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 22, 2001
BETHLEHEM, West Bank -- A day after Johnny Yousef Thalgieh was shot and killed, apparently by the Israeli army, his blood still stained Manger Square. It was preserved yesterday as a memorial, encircled by blue police gates and chunks of broken limestone. It is a stark remembrance of the tall, skinny 17-year-old, who wanted to become a priest and died from a bullet to the heart a few steps from the Church of the Nativity, one of the holiest shrines in Christendom. Members of Thalgieh's family mourned in their home yesterday, yards from the square, on a street whose Arabic name is translated "water from the well."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 3, 2005
BETHLEHEM, West Bank - They had jostled along the narrow streets that disappear into the dark warrens of the Dheisheh refugee camp, pressing forward to see Pope John Paul II and desperate for words of encouragement. That was in March 2000. The pope, who died yesterday, promised a new school, and the United Nations promptly built one. In Manger Square, Pope John Paul kissed a bowl of Palestinian soil and said, "Your torment is before the eyes of the world. And it has gone on too long." Pope John Paul, then 79, was already frail and suffering from Parkinson's disease when he embarked on what he described as a "jubilee pilgrimage" to Jordan, Syria, Israel and the West Bank.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 4, 2002
BETHLEHEM, West Bank - They crept along a stone pavement drenched by broken water mains and littered with spent shell casings and crushed cars, walking away from Christianity's cradle on a street named after Pope Paul VI. Sabri Balboul's family was clearly terrified, making a break for it yesterday after being on the wrong side of town Monday. They were caught there after the Israeli army moved into the city as part of its operation to overwhelm Palestinian militias and put a stop to terrorist attacks.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 9, 2002
BETHLEHEM, West Bank - The standoff between Israeli troops poised outside the Church of the Nativity and the Palestinian gunmen taking refuge inside seems destined to become a symbol of each side's determination to prevail in their conflict, regardless of how long it takes. The tactics used elsewhere in the West Bank will not work here, at the church built over the cave where some believe Jesus was born. In the city of Nablus, about 100 Palestinian fighters surrendered yesterday after days of street-to-street fighting.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 25, 2000
BETHLEHEM, West Bank - This year, there is plenty of room at the inn. "We have about 1,800 hotel rooms in Bethlehem," the Palestinian tourism minister, Mitri Abu Aita, said over thick Arabic coffee in the nearly deserted lobby of his family's Paradise Hotel. "They have all been empty since early October." One year ago last night, this little town played host to a sweet extravaganza, a 2000 Christmas Eve celebration that saw Manger Square ablaze with lights and packed with tourists, pilgrims and proud Palestinians.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 20, 2000
BETHLEHEM - Manger Square, the cradle of Christianity, is also the heart of a struggling Palestinian tourist industry that is this town's lifeblood. In good times, thousands of tourists and pilgrims a day amble across the wide stone-paved plaza, framed by the giant stone Church of the Nativity complex, the Omari Mosque, a civic and exhibition center, and a long row of restaurants and gift shops. Most of the visitors stoop low through the Door of Humility to enter the sixth-century Church of the Nativity.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 25, 1999
BETHLEHEM, West Bank -- It was the night this not-so-little town had been waiting for.Though tourism fell short of extravagant predictions, apparently out of security fears, thousands crowded lighted, decorated Manger Square in a carnival-like prelude to a stately Midnight Mass celebrating the birth of Christ here.For Palestinians unveiling a makeover of Bethlehem, it was the culmination of years of building, paving and planning in a $200 million drive to become a Year 2000 showplace. Never mind that it's still not ready, with half-built hotels, dust and rubble marring the approach to the newly scrubbed Old City of 50,000 people.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and By Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 25, 2001
BETHLEHEM, WEST BANK - The town where tradition says Jesus was born went through the motions of celebrating Christmas last night. With tourists frightened away by warfare and families still mourning casualties of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, religious services paid somber reverence to the birth of a peace child in a region where peace seems a distant dream. More people than last year came to Manger Square, then just two months after the Palestinian uprising began, but it was nowhere near the thousands who jammed the town during better times a few years ago. Yesterday, the crowd, probably not a thousand people, barely filled the large courtyard in front of the sixth- century Church of the Nativity, built over the stone grotto where Mary is said to have found a resting place for the Christ child in a cave.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 7, 2002
JERUSALEM - Two Greek Orthodox priests, a nun and two other women were spirited away from the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem yesterday, where a standoff between armed Palestinian militants and the Israeli army continued into its fifth day. The clergy members emerged shaken and silent from a large armored army vehicle that sped from the church, through an Israeli military checkpoint lined with tanks preparing for battle, and into Jerusalem. It was the second consecutive day that people have gotten out of the fortress-like church in Manger Square, taken over by between 120 and 240 men who shot their way inside last week to escape advancing Israeli soldiers.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 3, 2005
BETHLEHEM, West Bank - They had jostled along the narrow streets that disappear into the dark warrens of the Dheisheh refugee camp, pressing forward to see Pope John Paul II and desperate for words of encouragement. That was in March 2000. The pope, who died yesterday, promised a new school, and the United Nations promptly built one. In Manger Square, Pope John Paul kissed a bowl of Palestinian soil and said, "Your torment is before the eyes of the world. And it has gone on too long." Pope John Paul, then 79, was already frail and suffering from Parkinson's disease when he embarked on what he described as a "jubilee pilgrimage" to Jordan, Syria, Israel and the West Bank.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 7, 2002
JERUSALEM - Two Greek Orthodox priests, a nun and two other women were spirited away from the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem yesterday, where a standoff between armed Palestinian militants and the Israeli army continued into its fifth day. The clergy members emerged shaken and silent from a large armored army vehicle that sped from the church, through an Israeli military checkpoint lined with tanks preparing for battle, and into Jerusalem. It was the second consecutive day that people have gotten out of the fortress-like church in Manger Square, taken over by between 120 and 240 men who shot their way inside last week to escape advancing Israeli soldiers.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 4, 2002
BETHLEHEM, West Bank - They crept along a stone pavement drenched by broken water mains and littered with spent shell casings and crushed cars, walking away from Christianity's cradle on a street named after Pope Paul VI. Sabri Balboul's family was clearly terrified, making a break for it yesterday after being on the wrong side of town Monday. They were caught there after the Israeli army moved into the city as part of its operation to overwhelm Palestinian militias and put a stop to terrorist attacks.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and By Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 25, 2001
BETHLEHEM, WEST BANK - The town where tradition says Jesus was born went through the motions of celebrating Christmas last night. With tourists frightened away by warfare and families still mourning casualties of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, religious services paid somber reverence to the birth of a peace child in a region where peace seems a distant dream. More people than last year came to Manger Square, then just two months after the Palestinian uprising began, but it was nowhere near the thousands who jammed the town during better times a few years ago. Yesterday, the crowd, probably not a thousand people, barely filled the large courtyard in front of the sixth- century Church of the Nativity, built over the stone grotto where Mary is said to have found a resting place for the Christ child in a cave.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 30, 2001
BETHLEHEM, West Bank - This city needed help springing back to life yesterday. Residents emerged from bullet-riddled buildings and fire-scarred homes to begin rebuilding, but it will not be an easy task. Israeli tanks had rumbled out of Manger Square after fierce gunbattles with Palestinians and a siege of the town, but the fighting left unmistakable marks. Streets are gouged by the tanks and blocked by toppled light poles, downed power lines, uncollected trash and piles of rubble. Crumpled cars litter roadsides.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 22, 2001
BETHLEHEM, West Bank -- A day after Johnny Yousef Thalgieh was shot and killed, apparently by the Israeli army, his blood still stained Manger Square. It was preserved yesterday as a memorial, encircled by blue police gates and chunks of broken limestone. It is a stark remembrance of the tall, skinny 17-year-old, who wanted to become a priest and died from a bullet to the heart a few steps from the Church of the Nativity, one of the holiest shrines in Christendom. Members of Thalgieh's family mourned in their home yesterday, yards from the square, on a street whose Arabic name is translated "water from the well."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and By Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 30, 2001
BETHLEHEM, West Bank - This is a quest for a tourist. Surely, even during these times of unrest, some khaki-wearing, water-chugging American holding a camera in one hand and a Frommer's tour guide in the other will want to visit this cradle of Christianity, where Christ is believed to have been born. But Manger Square is virtually empty. The locals still come. A few worshipers pray inside the fortress-like Church of the Nativity, one of the oldest in the world. A handful of elderly Palestinians chat outside.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 9, 2002
BETHLEHEM, West Bank - The standoff between Israeli troops poised outside the Church of the Nativity and the Palestinian gunmen taking refuge inside seems destined to become a symbol of each side's determination to prevail in their conflict, regardless of how long it takes. The tactics used elsewhere in the West Bank will not work here, at the church built over the cave where some believe Jesus was born. In the city of Nablus, about 100 Palestinian fighters surrendered yesterday after days of street-to-street fighting.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 17, 1990
BETHLEHEM, Israeli-occupied West Bank -- What the people of Bethlehem like to remember about this time of year are the crowds of Christian pilgrims arriving in such numbers that their buses double-park in Manger Square. They remember the big municipal Christmas tree and the chance for the West Bank's Christian community to bask in the limelight.What people experience now is quite different. Instead of crowds, people remark upon the city's emptiness. The municipality gave up on decorating a tree.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 25, 2000
BETHLEHEM, West Bank - This year, there is plenty of room at the inn. "We have about 1,800 hotel rooms in Bethlehem," the Palestinian tourism minister, Mitri Abu Aita, said over thick Arabic coffee in the nearly deserted lobby of his family's Paradise Hotel. "They have all been empty since early October." One year ago last night, this little town played host to a sweet extravaganza, a 2000 Christmas Eve celebration that saw Manger Square ablaze with lights and packed with tourists, pilgrims and proud Palestinians.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 20, 2000
BETHLEHEM - Manger Square, the cradle of Christianity, is also the heart of a struggling Palestinian tourist industry that is this town's lifeblood. In good times, thousands of tourists and pilgrims a day amble across the wide stone-paved plaza, framed by the giant stone Church of the Nativity complex, the Omari Mosque, a civic and exhibition center, and a long row of restaurants and gift shops. Most of the visitors stoop low through the Door of Humility to enter the sixth-century Church of the Nativity.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.