Advertisement
HomeCollectionsManga
IN THE NEWS

Manga

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN REPORTER | February 26, 2006
Last month, when the teenage daughter on NBC's The Book of Daniel turned out to be a talented manga artist selling drugs to pay for her software, adults may have said, "Huh?" But their teenage daughters probably knew exactly what manga was. These black-and-white comics, translated from Japanese best-sellers and meant to be read back to front and right to left, are a huge hit with American teens and 'tweens. They can find manga (pronounced mahn-ga, with a hard G as in "girl") in the popular teen magazine Cosmo Girl or they wait impatiently for the next book in a series to be translated and brought to the shelves of a nearby Barnes & Noble or Waldenbooks.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | November 13, 2009
"La Boheme," MGM's 1926 silent epic of selfless love in the pursuit of high-quality playwriting, will be shown Sunday afternoon at St. Mark's Lutheran Church, with organ accompaniment by James Harp, director of opera and education for the Lyric Opera House. The movie, directed by King Vidor and based on Puccini's opera, stars John Gilbert as the struggling (and somewhat oblivious) playwright, Rodolphe, and Lillian Gish as his self-sacrificing muse, Mimi. The cast also includes Renee Adoree, Edward Everett Horton and Karl Dane.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By George Gene Gustines and George Gene Gustines,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 3, 2005
Sales of Japanese comics - more familiarly known as manga - are exploding in the United States, and much of the boom is due to efforts by comic book publishers to extend their reach beyond young male readers. Beyond all males, in fact. "Manga producers in the United States have tapped into a new audience for comics - the female consumer," said Milton Griepp, the publisher and founder of ICv2, an online trade publication that covers pop culture for retailers. In bookstores, the colorful, digest-size manga collections are usually next to the shelves of graphic novels, which feature iconic domestic characters like Batman and Spider-Man.
FEATURES
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Ishita Singh and Victoria A. Brownworth and Ishita Singh,Special to The Sun | June 10, 2008
School is almost out and that means one thing: It's time for summer reading lists. But this year, students who dread the idea of plodding through Shakespearean verse to learn the tales of star-crossed lovers and ruthless rulers can take heart. Wiley Publishers, famous (or infamous) for its Cliffs Notes study guides, has come out with Shakespeare in manga. So far, Haml et, Julius Caesar, Romeo and Juliet and Macbeth are available in the graphic novel style spawned in Japan and given full flower in the U.K. and U.S. Rated for ages 13 and older and priced at a mere $9.99, these abridged versions of the best-known plays in the English language are now vividly depicted in classic action-packed manga style: a kind of Saturday morning cartoon version of Shakespeare.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 24, 1996
TOKYO -- Many Japanese look to Kosaku Shima to teach them the impeccable corporate etiquette that will take them to the top of the business world.Many also look to Rintaro, a visionary, idealistic bureaucrat in the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, to teach them about the secret machinations of the nation's ministries and to share his insights on energy policy.Rintaro and Kosaku Shima boast social influence, enormous salaries and celebrity. Never heard of them? That may be because they aren't real.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | August 8, 1997
In Japan, the word "otaku" is something of an insult. Although it originally referred to dedicated hobbyists -- particularly hard-core fans of manga (comics) and anime (animation) -- it has over time acquired the aroma of obsession, suggesting a lack of social skills, nerdiness and geekdom.Most Japanese cringe at the term.In America, on the other hand, anime (pronounced "ah-nee-may") fans wear the label with pride. They have anime societies, Internet newsgroups, even their own conventions, such as Otakon '97. Billing itself as the "Convention of Otaku Generation," it will run for three days at Marriott's Hunt Valley Inn, starting today, and will feature everything from panel discussions and video marathons to a costume ball.
ENTERTAINMENT
By AARON CHESTER | February 28, 2008
MANGA TALK WHAT / / Opening lecture for Fifty-Three Stations of the Yokaido Road: A Haunted Journey Down a Classic Ukiyo-e, featuring GeGeGe no Kitaro. There will be a taped interview with manga creator Shigeru Mizuki and live talks with his associates WHEN / / The opening lecture is 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, and the exhibit runs through May 5 WHERE / / Japan Information and Culture Center, 1155 21st St. N.W., Washington WHY / / Because Mizuki is one of the creators of manga, or Japanese comic books, and he has re-created the classic Fifty Three Stations of the Yokaido Road Ukiyo-e series CONTACT / / Reservations required.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | November 13, 2009
"La Boheme," MGM's 1926 silent epic of selfless love in the pursuit of high-quality playwriting, will be shown Sunday afternoon at St. Mark's Lutheran Church, with organ accompaniment by James Harp, director of opera and education for the Lyric Opera House. The movie, directed by King Vidor and based on Puccini's opera, stars John Gilbert as the struggling (and somewhat oblivious) playwright, Rodolphe, and Lillian Gish as his self-sacrificing muse, Mimi. The cast also includes Renee Adoree, Edward Everett Horton and Karl Dane.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | March 3, 2006
Morgan Johnson called her mother frantically on her cell phone -- she had left the giant boomerang at home. The 5-foot-long boomerang, which dwarfed the petite 13-year-old, was essential to Morgan's costume, Sango the Demon Hunter. Morgan had cut the shape from foam, wrapped it in duct tape and painted it tan and brown. Luckily, her mother rushed in with the boomerang just as the costume contest at Saturday's anime and manga convention at the Brooklyn Park library in northern Anne Arundel County began.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 15, 1996
We like to think of comic books as something quintessentially American, like basketball or jazz. This is, after all, the home of Batman and Superman, the land that produced Spider-man and spawned the X-Men. What other country could possibly care about comic books as much as the good old U.S.A.?Japan could.That may seem hard to believe at first. In fact, Japanese readers probably care more about comics -- or "manga," as they're known there -- than their American counterparts."In 1995, there were about 2.3 billion manga books and magazines produced, and nearly 2 billion actually sold," says Frederik L. Schodt, author of "Manga!
ENTERTAINMENT
By AARON CHESTER | February 28, 2008
MANGA TALK WHAT / / Opening lecture for Fifty-Three Stations of the Yokaido Road: A Haunted Journey Down a Classic Ukiyo-e, featuring GeGeGe no Kitaro. There will be a taped interview with manga creator Shigeru Mizuki and live talks with his associates WHEN / / The opening lecture is 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, and the exhibit runs through May 5 WHERE / / Japan Information and Culture Center, 1155 21st St. N.W., Washington WHY / / Because Mizuki is one of the creators of manga, or Japanese comic books, and he has re-created the classic Fifty Three Stations of the Yokaido Road Ukiyo-e series CONTACT / / Reservations required.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 28, 2006
The 15 teens gathered at the Mountain Road library are way past Speed Racer. The classic 1960s Japanese cartoon featuring characters with unnaturally large eyes and tiny noses was the precursor to anime, an art form that has won over many American youths. Jessica Lindsay, 14, a freshman at Chesapeake High School, said her favorite show is Sailor Moon, which is about a 14-year-old girl with superpowers. Anime, she said, "brings more depth to the stories." She also likes manga, the graphic novel form of the art. Since February, she has been attending the monthly meetings of the Anime and Manga Club at the library in Pasadena.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | March 3, 2006
Morgan Johnson called her mother frantically on her cell phone -- she had left the giant boomerang at home. The 5-foot-long boomerang, which dwarfed the petite 13-year-old, was essential to Morgan's costume, Sango the Demon Hunter. Morgan had cut the shape from foam, wrapped it in duct tape and painted it tan and brown. Luckily, her mother rushed in with the boomerang just as the costume contest at Saturday's anime and manga convention at the Brooklyn Park library in northern Anne Arundel County began.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | March 1, 2006
Morgan Johnson called her mother frantically on her cell phone - she had left the giant boomerang at home. The 5-foot-long boomerang, which dwarfed the petite 13-year-old, was essential to Morgan's costume, Sango the Demon Hunter. Morgan had cut the shape from foam, wrapped it in duct tape and painted it tan and brown. Luckily, her mother rushed in with the boomerang just as the costume contest at Saturday's anime and manga convention at the Brooklyn Park library began. As Morgan slung the boomerang over her back, Tessa Fowler, 12, unsheathed her plastic sword and Shawna Phelps, 15, stapled clouds of red fabric to a black cape.
FEATURES
By George Gene Gustines and George Gene Gustines,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 3, 2005
Sales of Japanese comics - more familiarly known as manga - are exploding in the United States, and much of the boom is due to efforts by comic book publishers to extend their reach beyond young male readers. Beyond all males, in fact. "Manga producers in the United States have tapped into a new audience for comics - the female consumer," said Milton Griepp, the publisher and founder of ICv2, an online trade publication that covers pop culture for retailers. In bookstores, the colorful, digest-size manga collections are usually next to the shelves of graphic novels, which feature iconic domestic characters like Batman and Spider-Man.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | August 8, 1997
In Japan, the word "otaku" is something of an insult. Although it originally referred to dedicated hobbyists -- particularly hard-core fans of manga (comics) and anime (animation) -- it has over time acquired the aroma of obsession, suggesting a lack of social skills, nerdiness and geekdom.Most Japanese cringe at the term.In America, on the other hand, anime (pronounced "ah-nee-may") fans wear the label with pride. They have anime societies, Internet newsgroups, even their own conventions, such as Otakon '97. Billing itself as the "Convention of Otaku Generation," it will run for three days at Marriott's Hunt Valley Inn, starting today, and will feature everything from panel discussions and video marathons to a costume ball.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | March 1, 2006
Morgan Johnson called her mother frantically on her cell phone - she had left the giant boomerang at home. The 5-foot-long boomerang, which dwarfed the petite 13-year-old, was essential to Morgan's costume, Sango the Demon Hunter. Morgan had cut the shape from foam, wrapped it in duct tape and painted it tan and brown. Luckily, her mother rushed in with the boomerang just as the costume contest at Saturday's anime and manga convention at the Brooklyn Park library began. As Morgan slung the boomerang over her back, Tessa Fowler, 12, unsheathed her plastic sword and Shawna Phelps, 15, stapled clouds of red fabric to a black cape.
NEWS
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,sun staff | September 29, 1996
Contrary to what the slogan says, comics are not for everyone. Nowadays in the United States, comic books hardly seem to be for anyone. Thanks to an industry that has come to emphasize "collectible" packaging and crossover gimmickry instead of such simple strengths as meaningful characters and memorable stories, comic book sales are in a deep slump, as fewer and fewer readers seem interested in the exploits of superheroes and mutants.Nor are things much better over in newspapers' funny pages.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.