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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,[Sun Reporter] | January 14, 2007
The lift he gets from singing. His best friend's death from skin cancer. The biology behind feelings of euphoria. Helpful advice given by his wife. His battles with depression. MANDY PATINKIN / / 8 p.m. Saturday / / Lyric Opera House / / 410-547-7328
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | April 17, 2007
A celebration of the first African-American opera company, Tony Award-winning Broadway veterans, notable dance and symphonic ensembles, and golden-oldie rock groups are among the events likely to draw a good deal of attention during the Music Center at Strathmore's 2007-2008 season. The lineup, announced yesterday, includes the center's first original production. This new work, Free to Sing, will tell the 19th-century story of Washington's Colored American Opera Company, which was formed in 1873.
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FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1996
Mandy Patinkin makes up his own private story for every song he sings in concert -- but don't ask him what they are. He's not telling."All I want you to see is someone connected to the words," he says, speaking by car phone as he drives along the Palisades Parkway to his home in New York City."
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,[Sun Reporter] | January 14, 2007
The lift he gets from singing. His best friend's death from skin cancer. The biology behind feelings of euphoria. Helpful advice given by his wife. His battles with depression. MANDY PATINKIN / / 8 p.m. Saturday / / Lyric Opera House / / 410-547-7328
FEATURES
September 12, 1990
Kathryn Grody, who stars with Diane Keaton and Carol Kane in ''The Lemon Sisters,'' currently showing at local theaters, will do a one-woman show called ''A Mom's Life,'' Sunday, Sept. 23, at 3 p.m. at Westminster Hall (515 West Fayette St.). All tickets are $10.Grody is married to actor-singer Mandy Patinkin (''Dick Tracy''). Her show is ''about the joys and frustrations of being a mother.''Grody is a two-time winner of the off-Broadway Obie Award. Her presentation is part of the Command Performance program sponsored by the University of Maryland at Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | October 17, 1999
Like every other great composer, the life of Frederic Chopin has been travestied by Hollywood. But he's also the only composer who has escaped such treatment -- if only in a single movie. "Impromptu" (released in 1991 and available on video) brings Chopin and his circle of friends (including novelist George Sand, poet Alfred de Musset, painter Eugene Delacroix, pianist-composer Franz Liszt and the latter's ever-pregnant mistress, Marie d'Agoult) to uncanny life.Pulitzer Prize-winning stage director James Lapine ("Sunday in the Park with George")
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 28, 1990
SHAKING THE TREEPeter Gabriel (Geffen 24326)There is a difference between a "Greatest Hits" collection, and a "Best Of" compilation, and few albums make that point more clearly than Peter Gabriel's "Shaking the Tree." Sure, it has hits -- "Solsbury Hill," "Shock the Monkey" and "Sledgehammer" are all included -- but the album's greatest strength is that its 16 selections go beyond the expected to show just what makes Gabriel's work so special. And though his songs are often demanding, whether ethnic experiments like the wondrously hypnotic title tune or haunting ballads like the remade "Here Comes the Flood," they reward the listener in ways more accessible pop never manages.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1996
What? No more Olympics? Medals? Tiny gymnasts? Speedy racers? Get over it."Battlefield" (9 p.m.-11 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- The Battle of the Rhine, the World War II conflict in which the Allied forces liberated Nazi-held countries and captured Berlin, is chronicled, as are D-Day and the Battle of Normandy. PBS."Seinfeld" (9 p.m.-9: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- This is what happens when single people buy food at warehouses. They end up like Kramer, who has so many cans of Beeferino that he feeds some of it to a horse, with disastrous results.
FEATURES
By STEVE MCKERROW and STEVE MCKERROW,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1995
The saga of space aliens on Earth resumes on Fox tonight with a movie-length sequel to the series "Alien Nation," while DNA evidence is applied to an old mystery on "Nova."* "Baseball League Championship Series" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- We're going to see only the American League series here this year, under the game's ridiculous who's-on-first playoff system. But after Seattle's surprising knock-out of the New York Yankees, the Mariners/Cleveland Indians matchup could be a good one. ABC.* "Alien Nation: Body and Soul" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | February 7, 2002
Brockovich opens lecture series Consumer advocate and Hollywood celebrity Erin Brockovich (pictured) kicks off the "Unique Lives & Experiences Lecture Series" at 7:30 p.m. Monday at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. A single mother with little formal education, Brockovich made history in 1996 by helping win a $333 million lawsuit for the residents of Hinkley, Calif., against a giant California utility company. The five-part women's lecture series, which provides a forum for dialogue and interaction, also features Lesley Stahl, co-host of 60 Minutes, March 18; Jehan Sadat, widow of Egyptian president Anwar Sadat, April 22; Maya Angelou, poet, playwright and author, May 14; and former first lady Barbara Bush, June 3. Subscriptions to the series are $119-$249; prices for single tickets vary.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Greg Morago and Greg Morago,THE HARTFORD COURANT | March 7, 2004
It appears that some Communist revolutionaries never really die - they just keep inspiring new generations of beret-wearing acolytes. Che Guevara, the Argentine-born guerrilla leader who became a hero to the New Left radicals of the 1960s, has been dead since 1967. But the spirit of the revolutionary theorist is very much alive. Oh, sure, there have been minor Che moments recently (Elizabeth Hurley was photographed in London wearing a Che T-shirt; rapper Jay-Z sports similar Che-wear on the cover of his MTV Unplugged recording; humorist Margaret Cho uses an iconic Cho-as-Che illustration to promote her latest "Revolution Tour")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | February 7, 2002
Brockovich opens lecture series Consumer advocate and Hollywood celebrity Erin Brockovich (pictured) kicks off the "Unique Lives & Experiences Lecture Series" at 7:30 p.m. Monday at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. A single mother with little formal education, Brockovich made history in 1996 by helping win a $333 million lawsuit for the residents of Hinkley, Calif., against a giant California utility company. The five-part women's lecture series, which provides a forum for dialogue and interaction, also features Lesley Stahl, co-host of 60 Minutes, March 18; Jehan Sadat, widow of Egyptian president Anwar Sadat, April 22; Maya Angelou, poet, playwright and author, May 14; and former first lady Barbara Bush, June 3. Subscriptions to the series are $119-$249; prices for single tickets vary.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | October 17, 1999
Like every other great composer, the life of Frederic Chopin has been travestied by Hollywood. But he's also the only composer who has escaped such treatment -- if only in a single movie. "Impromptu" (released in 1991 and available on video) brings Chopin and his circle of friends (including novelist George Sand, poet Alfred de Musset, painter Eugene Delacroix, pianist-composer Franz Liszt and the latter's ever-pregnant mistress, Marie d'Agoult) to uncanny life.Pulitzer Prize-winning stage director James Lapine ("Sunday in the Park with George")
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1996
What? No more Olympics? Medals? Tiny gymnasts? Speedy racers? Get over it."Battlefield" (9 p.m.-11 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- The Battle of the Rhine, the World War II conflict in which the Allied forces liberated Nazi-held countries and captured Berlin, is chronicled, as are D-Day and the Battle of Normandy. PBS."Seinfeld" (9 p.m.-9: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- This is what happens when single people buy food at warehouses. They end up like Kramer, who has so many cans of Beeferino that he feeds some of it to a horse, with disastrous results.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1996
Mandy Patinkin makes up his own private story for every song he sings in concert -- but don't ask him what they are. He's not telling."All I want you to see is someone connected to the words," he says, speaking by car phone as he drives along the Palisades Parkway to his home in New York City."
FEATURES
By STEVE MCKERROW and STEVE MCKERROW,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1995
The saga of space aliens on Earth resumes on Fox tonight with a movie-length sequel to the series "Alien Nation," while DNA evidence is applied to an old mystery on "Nova."* "Baseball League Championship Series" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- We're going to see only the American League series here this year, under the game's ridiculous who's-on-first playoff system. But after Seattle's surprising knock-out of the New York Yankees, the Mariners/Cleveland Indians matchup could be a good one. ABC.* "Alien Nation: Body and Soul" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 16, 1991
Why can't a woman be more like a man? One reason, as George Sand (nee Amandine Aurore Dupin), found out was that nobody liked it very much.Sand, played with a dervish's intensity by the splendid Australian actress Judy Davis in "Impromptu," gave up on her woman's name and her feminity early, stomped around Paris in the 1830s chewing on a cigar and dressed like a cavalry officer on leave. Of course her talent -- she was a brilliant novelist -- enabled her to get away with such scandalous behavior, which made women quiver and men hide and about which everybody gossiped deliciously.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Greg Morago and Greg Morago,THE HARTFORD COURANT | March 7, 2004
It appears that some Communist revolutionaries never really die - they just keep inspiring new generations of beret-wearing acolytes. Che Guevara, the Argentine-born guerrilla leader who became a hero to the New Left radicals of the 1960s, has been dead since 1967. But the spirit of the revolutionary theorist is very much alive. Oh, sure, there have been minor Che moments recently (Elizabeth Hurley was photographed in London wearing a Che T-shirt; rapper Jay-Z sports similar Che-wear on the cover of his MTV Unplugged recording; humorist Margaret Cho uses an iconic Cho-as-Che illustration to promote her latest "Revolution Tour")
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 16, 1991
Why can't a woman be more like a man? One reason, as George Sand (nee Amandine Aurore Dupin), found out was that nobody liked it very much.Sand, played with a dervish's intensity by the splendid Australian actress Judy Davis in "Impromptu," gave up on her woman's name and her feminity early, stomped around Paris in the 1830s chewing on a cigar and dressed like a cavalry officer on leave. Of course her talent -- she was a brilliant novelist -- enabled her to get away with such scandalous behavior, which made women quiver and men hide and about which everybody gossiped deliciously.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 28, 1990
SHAKING THE TREEPeter Gabriel (Geffen 24326)There is a difference between a "Greatest Hits" collection, and a "Best Of" compilation, and few albums make that point more clearly than Peter Gabriel's "Shaking the Tree." Sure, it has hits -- "Solsbury Hill," "Shock the Monkey" and "Sledgehammer" are all included -- but the album's greatest strength is that its 16 selections go beyond the expected to show just what makes Gabriel's work so special. And though his songs are often demanding, whether ethnic experiments like the wondrously hypnotic title tune or haunting ballads like the remade "Here Comes the Flood," they reward the listener in ways more accessible pop never manages.
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