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Mandatory Retirement

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NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | March 14, 1993
Just over a week ago, Col. Vernon A. Sevier was airlifting food and relief supplies from Mombasa, Kenya, to dusty little airstrips deep inside Somalia on the horn of East Africa.On Thanksgiving, the Towson resident was on the opposite side of the continent, flying volunteer relief missions from Spain to Monrovia, Liberia, trying to ease the pain of that nation's bitter civil war.In just over three weeks, however, it will all be over -- a 42-year military career will have come to a screeching halt.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 26, 2014
People of a certain age will appreciate this: Charles G. "Chuck" Bernstein, who loved being a Baltimore circuit judge so much that he made a federal case out of his mandatory retirement at 70, appears to have been elected a judge again. If the tally from Tuesday's primary holds up, Bernstein will return to the bench at the age of 75. He'll probably ride his bike to work, too. The Orphans' Court of Baltimore City does not require its three judges to retire at a particular age. (It didn't even require a law degree until four years ago.)
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SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2004
CORDOVA - When racing officials created the Old Saint Nick Pace just before Christmas at Rosecroft Raceway, they limited the race to horses at least 10 years old. The intention was to showcase a local celebrity named Romanoble, a 14-year-old warhorse making his 353rd - and final - start. The old boy was being forced out to pasture. Harness racing requires mandatory retirement for horses at the end of their 14th year. Romanoble would turn 15 on Jan. 1, the official birthday of all racehorses.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2013
For the past year, the Office of Personnel Management has been working on regulations that will allow older federal workers to phase into retirement. The idea is that these employees would continue to work part time, collect a partial pension — and pass on their knowledge and experience to the next generation of federal workers . Many older workers are eagerly awaiting the program's launch. "A lot of retirement-eligible workers don't feel ready to retire," said Jessica Klement, legislative director of the National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi, Jr. and William F. Zorzi, Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | November 2, 1994
A majority of Maryland's black judges have launched an effort to defeat a ballot question that will be put before voters next Tuesday -- a constitutional amendment that would allow jurists to remain on the bench until they are 75.The Black Judges Conference, an informal group of the state's black judiciary, maintains that the amendment -- which would raise the mandatory retirement age from 70 -- would stunt the advancement of young, female and black lawyers...
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 26, 2014
People of a certain age will appreciate this: Charles G. "Chuck" Bernstein, who loved being a Baltimore circuit judge so much that he made a federal case out of his mandatory retirement at 70, appears to have been elected a judge again. If the tally from Tuesday's primary holds up, Bernstein will return to the bench at the age of 75. He'll probably ride his bike to work, too. The Orphans' Court of Baltimore City does not require its three judges to retire at a particular age. (It didn't even require a law degree until four years ago.)
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1999
The list of applicants for a Carroll Circuit Court vacancy was noted yesterday for its number -- 13 -- and for the absence of the county's two District Court judges, who normally would be considered to have a head start.The position opened with the mandatory retirement of Circuit Judge Francis M. Arnold, who turns 70 next month and has served on the court since 1990, after 10 years in the District Court.The last open judgeship in 1995 for the District Court drew a field of 21 county lawyers -- almost every one of them well known through a local practice.
BUSINESS
By Diane Stafford and Diane Stafford,McClatchy-Tribune | February 6, 2008
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Bud Speace of Lenexa, Kan., has a pilot job waiting for him in Kazakhstan, if he wants to accept a six-weeks-on, two-weeks-off schedule for Air Astana. Jim Hathcoat of Olathe, Kan., prefers to stay closer to home, so he's scouting pilot options for small, executive aircraft charters. Both men were among the United States' most experienced pilots until they were pushed out of their jobs last year - Speace from America West and Hathcoat from Frontier Airlines. They had to retire because a Federal Aviation Administration regulation required retirement at age 60 for pilots of U.S. commercial air carriers.
BUSINESS
By JANET KIDD STEWART | October 10, 2004
HE'S READY to retire, she's not. The financial adviser is smiling, the marriage counselor is not. Couples do themselves a big financial favor by keeping different timetables for retirement, financial advisers say. But they face a barrage of relationship obstacles, from painful balance-of-power shifts to starkly different ideas about how lavishly they want to live later in life. Over 38 years of marriage, Chris and Bob Brown faced plenty of challenges. Still, when Bob, a commercial airline pilot, reached mandatory retirement three years ago at age 60, he turned in a huge piece of his identity with his wings.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Sun Staff Writer | March 7, 1994
Although Leonard S. Jacobson retired early from the Baltimore County Circuit Court, he wants to quash rumors that he's dying -- or running for county executive.Instead, the gregarious judge said, he was tempted off the bench three years before mandatory retirement to serve as a special master in the Family Law Settlement Court, helping parties entangled in divorce and custody cases work out their differences without a trial.It's the kind of grueling, difficult work many jurists dislike, but Judge Jacobson said he was always drawn to it."
BUSINESS
By Diane Stafford and Diane Stafford,McClatchy-Tribune | February 6, 2008
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Bud Speace of Lenexa, Kan., has a pilot job waiting for him in Kazakhstan, if he wants to accept a six-weeks-on, two-weeks-off schedule for Air Astana. Jim Hathcoat of Olathe, Kan., prefers to stay closer to home, so he's scouting pilot options for small, executive aircraft charters. Both men were among the United States' most experienced pilots until they were pushed out of their jobs last year - Speace from America West and Hathcoat from Frontier Airlines. They had to retire because a Federal Aviation Administration regulation required retirement at age 60 for pilots of U.S. commercial air carriers.
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart | June 5, 2005
ANOTHER brass ring is shifting. Not even two decades ago, a key marker of financial success was early retirement. And the earlier the better. Merger waves of the 1980s pumped thousands of managers into early-retirement packages, perceived as coveted rewards. The scene is different for today's financial titans, said Ken Dychtwald, a gerontologist and founder of Age Wave, a San Francisco firm that counsels large employers on work force issues. He points to Alan Greenspan, leading the Federal Reserve Bank at age 79; Rupert Murdoch still battling for domination of the media industry at 74, and Warren E. Buffett, also 74, still leading the faithful at Berkshire Hathaway Inc. "There is clearly a movement that continuing to work is not only necessary but enjoyable," says Dychtwald, who completed a global survey of attitudes about retirement for financial supermarket HSBC last month.
BUSINESS
By JANET KIDD STEWART | October 10, 2004
HE'S READY to retire, she's not. The financial adviser is smiling, the marriage counselor is not. Couples do themselves a big financial favor by keeping different timetables for retirement, financial advisers say. But they face a barrage of relationship obstacles, from painful balance-of-power shifts to starkly different ideas about how lavishly they want to live later in life. Over 38 years of marriage, Chris and Bob Brown faced plenty of challenges. Still, when Bob, a commercial airline pilot, reached mandatory retirement three years ago at age 60, he turned in a huge piece of his identity with his wings.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2004
CORDOVA - When racing officials created the Old Saint Nick Pace just before Christmas at Rosecroft Raceway, they limited the race to horses at least 10 years old. The intention was to showcase a local celebrity named Romanoble, a 14-year-old warhorse making his 353rd - and final - start. The old boy was being forced out to pasture. Harness racing requires mandatory retirement for horses at the end of their 14th year. Romanoble would turn 15 on Jan. 1, the official birthday of all racehorses.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2003
A. Gordon Boone Jr., scion of the storied Maryland political family, glared down from his judge's bench at the man in ankle chains who was explaining his predicament. He did not really assault his ex-girlfriend, the man told the judge. He just wanted to see his son, he said, and she had set him up. She knew that he was on probation and that a complaint could send him back to jail. The judge interrupted, his booming voice equal parts gravel and gentlemanly lilt. "These women, they know that!"
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 29, 1999
The judicial certificates are gone. So are most of the books.And in two weeks, their owner, Anne Arundel Circuit Judge Lawrence H. Rushworth, will also be leaving -- retirement-bound after about 15 years on the District Court and Circuit Court benches.At 65, Rushworth is five years shy of the mandatory retirement age. But he said recent knee surgery, a desire to travel, changes in the practice of law, and financial considerations led him to conclude that the timing was right."It's traumatic," Rushworth said.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN STAFF | October 18, 1995
In a sharp and unusual rebuke, the judicial nominating commission for Baltimore has refused to nominate Circuit Judge Elsbeth Levy Bothe for reappointment, making it likely she will at least temporarily lose her seat on the bench.Commission members gave no reason for their action, though the sometimes irascible judge has been chided for interrupting trial testimony and for seeking to stay on the bench when she is close to mandatory retirement.The action marked the first time in memory that a sitting circuit judge's name had not been forwarded to the governor for reappointment.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 29, 1999
The judicial certificates are gone. So are most of the books.And in two weeks, their owner, Anne Arundel Circuit Judge Lawrence H. Rushworth, will also be leaving -- retirement-bound after about 15 years on the District Court and Circuit Court benches.At 65, Rushworth is five years shy of the mandatory retirement age. But he said recent knee surgery, a desire to travel, changes in the practice of law, and financial considerations led him to conclude that the timing was right."It's traumatic," Rushworth said.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | July 18, 1999
Retired Maryland Judge Robert F. Sweeney, who oversaw the creation of the state's highly regarded District Court system to replace a corruption-riddled patchwork of local courts, died of leukemia yesterday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center.Judge Sweeney, who was 72, was the first and only chief judge of the District Court system from its creation in 1971 until his mandatory retirement three years ago.A politically adept jurist who succeeded with a combination of charm and determination, he has been credited with leading the modernization of a court system that had been overseen by politically minded, and at times corrupt, judges, magistrates and justices of the peace.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1999
The list of applicants for a Carroll Circuit Court vacancy was noted yesterday for its number -- 13 -- and for the absence of the county's two District Court judges, who normally would be considered to have a head start.The position opened with the mandatory retirement of Circuit Judge Francis M. Arnold, who turns 70 next month and has served on the court since 1990, after 10 years in the District Court.The last open judgeship in 1995 for the District Court drew a field of 21 county lawyers -- almost every one of them well known through a local practice.
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