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Mandatory Recycling

NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke, Greg Tasker and Anne Haddad and Kerry O'Rourke, Greg Tasker and Anne Haddad,Staff Writers | January 24, 1993
For much of the past two years, the Carroll commissioners -- now at the midpoint of their four-year term -- have been consumed by money matters.They have generally received high marks for their "care and concern" in trimming millions from the budget and for responding to social services needs.But while they appear cordial in public, the commissioners say that behind the scenes things aren't always so pleasant.They disagree about how much time and money should be spent attracting business to the county.
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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | November 4, 1993
Local trash haulers, worried about an ordinance that would allow the county commissioners to make recycling mandatory, aired their concerns yesterday at a workshop on the proposal.County officials, including County Attorney Charles W. Thompson Jr., Public Works Director Keith Kirschnick and Recycling Manager Vinnie Legge, were on hand to answer questions.Proposed by the commissioners in August, the ordinance would give them the authority to enact a mandatory recycling program if the county's recycling rate drops too low. Currently, the county has a voluntary curbside recycling program.
NEWS
March 3, 1991
With Harford's waste-to-energy plant unable to keep pace with the county's growing mountains of trash and the county's central landfill filling up faster than expected, the county is facing a crisis in its management of solid waste (see story, page 1). The county has no recycling program in effect now, but county administrators are researching what system to put in place. Options include curbside collection ofrecyclables and building a machine that would sort some recyclables at a central area.
NEWS
June 16, 1991
From: Frank W. SoltisFallstonIn my opinion, Councilwoman Theresa Pierno is "lily-livered."She is a recent transplant from New Jersey (1985) who has suddenly become an expert in the problems of the county.She doesn't have enough guts to deal with a really serious problem facing the county, which is recycling. It doesn't take an expert to figure out the name of the game is "developer bashing." A mandatory recycling legislation would of fend her homeowner friends who, like her, take the position "Iam here, now let's shut the door behind us and keep everyone out."
NEWS
May 27, 1993
County radio station wins service awardWTTR-AM is one of 10 radio stations nationwide to receive a Crystal Award from the National Association of Broadcasters.The 10 awards, sought by 44 finalists, recognize excellence in community service.The station's community service projects completed last year included raising $5,000 to fight muscular dystrophy, collecting 1,900 coats for the Coats for Kids campaign and helping 1,047 families in the Neighbors in Need program, WTTR officials said.The station, which focuses on Carroll County, also helped "the community sort out issues" such as the charter government referendum, the mandatory recycling quota and rapid growth, the nomination said.
NEWS
October 23, 1990
Recycling seems to have taken hold with readers of The Evening Sun and other callers to SUNDIAL.Of the 340 callers who responded to our "It's Your Call" question of whether they now recycle their trash, 214 said they did, while 126 said they didn't. When asked if they thought recycling efforts should be expanded, 318 callers were in favor of that idea, while only 21 were opposed. And on the question of whether certain items should be mandatory for recycling, 295 callers said yes, while 43 said no."
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2005
The comparison was not an unusual one. "For $2.50, you cannot buy a cup of coffee at Starbucks, but you can save hundreds if not thousands of lives by fully staffing fire and police," said Sara J. Naeseth. But Sara, a 16-year-old junior at Broadneck High School, is not a bureaucrat, entreating elected officials to support a tax. Rather, she was part of a group of Anne Arundel County high school students who immersed themselves in public policy and government administration through the county's Model Government program.
NEWS
March 24, 1991
Editor's note: What follows are some of the responses we received tothe survey "How should Harford recycle?" that appeared in the Harford County Sun March 3.RECYCLE FOR GOOD FEELINGFrom: Christine LehrBel AirFirst of all, I would like to say I really enjoyed the recycle article in the Feb. 24 edition, "Recycling: a cause whose time has come in the county," by Mark Guidera. He really spoke the truth when he said, "Everyone can do it (recycle), except for those who are lazy."Recycling is something everyone should be doing.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Staff Writer | June 29, 1993
The town of Bel Air has filed a lawsuit against Harford County, contending it does not owe nearly $90,000 in "tipping fee" charges and interest for dumping trash at the county landfill.In filing the civil lawsuit yesterday, attorneys for Bel Air cited a 1969 agreement with the county that allowed Bel Air free dumping rights.Under that agreement, the lawsuit contends, Bel Air turned over its 9-acre landfill to the county so that it could build the County Detention Center.In return, Harford guaranteed Bel Air the right to haul trash free for 99 years to the county's Tollgate dump, which closed in 1987.
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