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Mandated Benefits

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By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | March 8, 1991
Even as state-mandated health benefits come under their severest attack in years, scores of people urged legislators to add four more such benefits.The appeals were made yesterday before the Economics Affairs Committee in the House of Delegates. If the proposals are enacted, health insurers would be required to provide coverage for the preventive care of children, care for new born and newly adopted children, treatment for certain types of mental illnesses, and mammography to detect breast cancer.
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BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2002
The cost of state-required health insurance benefits is bumping up against a statutory affordability ceiling, according to a report yesterday to the Maryland Health Care Commission. Under a 1999 law, the benefits' cost per policy was limited to 2.20 percent of the state's average annual wage. This year the cost of required benefits, generally known as mandates, is a hair below that, the report concluded, at 2.19 percent of the average wage - or $841 per year per policy. "This is becoming a crisis," Gerard Petrik, the commission's chief of benefits and analysis, said in presenting the report.
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BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | January 7, 1991
A coalition of labor and business groups today endorsed the idea of low-cost basic health insurance that would be exempt from the state's controversial mandated benefits.This position is a departure for the Maryland-D.C. AFL-CIO, the state's largest labor federation, which had fought for mandated benefits in the past.By state law, certain benefits are required in health insurance policies. These benefits include transplants, in vitro fertilization, mental-health care and substance-abuse treatment.
NEWS
April 2, 2002
It's time for insurers to pay their share for mental health Jay Hancock blames mandated benefits for rising health insurance costs and, subsequently, for increasing the numbers of the uninsured ("Legislated health benefits cause loss of essential care," March 20). He specifically mentions mandated coverage of mental health crisis care as indicative of "well-intentioned" policy that "swells the legions of the uninsured." It's astounding that Mr. Hancock fails to mention the spiraling costs of pharmaceuticals or insurance company profit margins as contributing to rising costs.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff RTC | December 24, 1990
A proposal by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland to offer low-cost health insurance to some of the 570,000 Marylanders who do not have coverage has come under fire from a consumer group.Maryland Citizen Action Coalition said the plan would undermine the state's system of required health-insurance benefits and be too expensive for many uninsured people.But Blue Cross said the plan will not present any competition to existing plans that fall under state requirements and that it is targeted to only a segment of the uninsured population.
NEWS
By Sharon Hornberger | March 10, 1991
As I see it, "no frills" health insurance is gaining ground.Of the nearly 600,000 people in Maryland who have no health insurance, more than 50 percent are employed. They are either self-employed or work for businesses too small to afford group coverage.Half of the employed uninsured earn more than $20,000 and 20 percent earn more than $40,000 annually.In Carroll County, 13,000 people, or 11.7 percent of the population, carry no health insurance.Of Maryland's 40,722 small businesses, employing one to 25 people, 43 percent offer no health insurance coverage to their employees.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2002
The cost of state-required health insurance benefits is bumping up against a statutory affordability ceiling, according to a report yesterday to the Maryland Health Care Commission. Under a 1999 law, the benefits' cost per policy was limited to 2.20 percent of the state's average annual wage. This year the cost of required benefits, generally known as mandates, is a hair below that, the report concluded, at 2.19 percent of the average wage - or $841 per year per policy. "This is becoming a crisis," Gerard Petrik, the commission's chief of benefits and analysis, said in presenting the report.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | March 8, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Last year, when the General Assembly considered adding to the list of mandated health insurance benefits, business groups and insurance companies managed to defer the debate: "Set up a commission to sit down and study the merits of these new mandates and wait until next year," they said.Now it's next year.Advocates of new mandated benefits for child wellness services -- including immunizations, developmental assessments and health screenings -- and for mammography tests for women 35 and older, marched before the House Economic Matters Committee yesterday with the fruits of last year's delay.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | February 13, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The latest estimates show there are about 570,000 people in Maryland without insurance, and Delegate Casper R. Taylor Jr., D-Allegany, chairman of the House Economic Matters Committee, will submit a bill today that aims to do something about it.The legislation, the result of extensive negotiations between Mr. Taylor and members of a coalition of business and labor groups, would allow insurers to offer a stripped-down health-insurance package that...
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | January 8, 1991
Two strange political bedfellows -- labor and management -- are joining together during this session of the state General Assembly to fight a common foe -- soaring medical costs.The Maryland Chamber of Commerce and the Maryland-D.C. AFL-CIO yesterday unveiled a set of legislative proposals that they say will help stem the rise in medical fees not regulated by state agencies."This is more than just a start. It's a great step towards a resolution," said Ed Mohler, president of the Maryland-D.
NEWS
By THOMAS DiLORENZO | May 25, 1993
The Maryland state legislature has stolen the Clintons' health-care thunder by enacting a new law that creates a more bureaucratically planned health- insurance industry. The new law provides for price controls, mandated benefits and bureaucratic micro management by a new ''Health Care Access and Cost Commission'' and is widely touted as a model of ''managed competition,'' the theme of the Clinton administration's health-care reform package.The law focuses on small businesses, since that is where there are supposedly thousands of uninsured or underinsured workers.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | March 30, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The business community came to Annapolis this year with high hopes of cutting health-care costs.But with about a week to go in the 90-day legislative session, most of those hopes appear to be --ed. In fact, some measures headed for passage may add to the average company's health-care bill."I don't want to use the word depressed or anything," said Miles Cole, a lobbyist with the Maryland Chamber of Commerce, "but we realize it's an ongoing battle to contain the cost of health care."
NEWS
By Sharon Hornberger | March 10, 1991
As I see it, "no frills" health insurance is gaining ground.Of the nearly 600,000 people in Maryland who have no health insurance, more than 50 percent are employed. They are either self-employed or work for businesses too small to afford group coverage.Half of the employed uninsured earn more than $20,000 and 20 percent earn more than $40,000 annually.In Carroll County, 13,000 people, or 11.7 percent of the population, carry no health insurance.Of Maryland's 40,722 small businesses, employing one to 25 people, 43 percent offer no health insurance coverage to their employees.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | March 8, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Last year, when the General Assembly considered adding to the list of mandated health insurance benefits, business groups and insurance companies managed to defer the debate: "Set up a commission to sit down and study the merits of these new mandates and wait until next year," they said.Now it's next year.Advocates of new mandated benefits for child wellness services -- including immunizations, developmental assessments and health screenings -- and for mammography tests for women 35 and older, marched before the House Economic Matters Committee yesterday with the fruits of last year's delay.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | March 8, 1991
Even as state-mandated health benefits come under their severest attack in years, scores of people urged legislators to add four more such benefits.The appeals were made yesterday before the Economics Affairs Committee in the House of Delegates. If the proposals are enacted, health insurers would be required to provide coverage for the preventive care of children, care for new born and newly adopted children, treatment for certain types of mental illnesses, and mammography to detect breast cancer.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | February 17, 1991
AnnapolisThe struggle to contain health-care costs is beginning to take on epic proportions in Annapolis, as businesses, providers and insurers move in and out of alliances with each other, depending on the legislation of the day.With rising costs, a weak economy and growing legions of uninsured, something has to give. Consider:* Total U.S. spending on health care rose to a record $604 billion in 1989, or to $2,400 for every man, woman and child in the country, the federal Health Care Financing Administration reported in December.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | March 30, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The business community came to Annapolis this year with high hopes of cutting health-care costs.But with about a week to go in the 90-day legislative session, most of those hopes appear to be --ed. In fact, some measures headed for passage may add to the average company's health-care bill."I don't want to use the word depressed or anything," said Miles Cole, a lobbyist with the Maryland Chamber of Commerce, "but we realize it's an ongoing battle to contain the cost of health care."
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | February 17, 1991
AnnapolisThe struggle to contain health-care costs is beginning to take on epic proportions in Annapolis, as businesses, providers and insurers move in and out of alliances with each other, depending on the legislation of the day.With rising costs, a weak economy and growing legions of uninsured, something has to give. Consider:* Total U.S. spending on health care rose to a record $604 billion in 1989, or to $2,400 for every man, woman and child in the country, the federal Health Care Financing Administration reported in December.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | February 13, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The latest estimates show there are about 570,000 people in Maryland without insurance, and Delegate Casper R. Taylor Jr., D-Allegany, chairman of the House Economic Matters Committee, will submit a bill today that aims to do something about it.The legislation, the result of extensive negotiations between Mr. Taylor and members of a coalition of business and labor groups, would allow insurers to offer a stripped-down health-insurance package that...
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | January 8, 1991
Two strange political bedfellows -- labor and management -- are joining together during this session of the state General Assembly to fight a common foe -- soaring medical costs.The Maryland Chamber of Commerce and the Maryland-D.C. AFL-CIO yesterday unveiled a set of legislative proposals that they say will help stem the rise in medical fees not regulated by state agencies."This is more than just a start. It's a great step towards a resolution," said Ed Mohler, president of the Maryland-D.
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