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By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | December 25, 2006
Colin Lyman stood in front of his classmates with a color photograph of his family and spoke cautiously as he pointed to each face. "Baba, mama, didi, yeye, nainai, gege," said the 16-year- old junior at Columbia's Wilde Lake High School, identifying his father, mother, younger brother, grandfather, grandmother and older brother. His teacher, Wei-chuan Liu, nodded and then broke his momentum with a question in Mandarin Chinese. "I don't know what you are saying," Colin said, laughing.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2013
The National Zoo's adorable baby giant panda cub got a really appropriate name today. The 100-day-old female cub was dubbed "Bao Bao," which means "precious" or "treasure" in Mandarin Chinese. Bao Bao is the second surviving panda cub to be born in the U.S. since China gave two pandas to the National Zoo as a state gift in 1972 after a visit by President Richard Nixon and his wife. More than 123,000 votes were cast in an online contest to choose the panda's name. The other names, Ling Hua (ling-HWA)
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2013
The National Zoo's adorable baby giant panda cub got a really appropriate name today. The 100-day-old female cub was dubbed "Bao Bao," which means "precious" or "treasure" in Mandarin Chinese. Bao Bao is the second surviving panda cub to be born in the U.S. since China gave two pandas to the National Zoo as a state gift in 1972 after a visit by President Richard Nixon and his wife. More than 123,000 votes were cast in an online contest to choose the panda's name. The other names, Ling Hua (ling-HWA)
NEWS
June 8, 2008
HCC offers Arabic, Mandarin classes Howard Community College will begin its second year of STARTALK, its free program for high school students (including incoming ninth-graders and newly graduated seniors) to learn Arabic or Mandarin Chinese. Classes, which will be taught by experienced native speakers, will teach communicative ability and cultural awareness. Students will receive eight college credits and will be prepared to start intermediate-level classes. The seven-week session of classes will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, June 23 through Aug. 7. There is a $50 registration fee, which can be waived for students with demonstrated financial need.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | November 14, 2006
Timothy O'Donovan Evans, a linguist and former coordinator of the Maryland Business Center China, died of cancer Wednesday at Virginia Hospital Center in Arlington. The former Ruxton resident was 38. Mr. Evans was born in Baltimore and raised in Ruxton. He was a 1986 graduate of Loyola High School, where his fluency in Spanish, German and Portuguese earned him the school's top language award. "Even though he had an amazing memory and a natural gift for languages and politics, he still managed to watch a lot of terrible TV shows when we were in high school," said Steven R. Porter, a friend since seventh grade.
NEWS
June 8, 2008
HCC offers Arabic, Mandarin classes Howard Community College will begin its second year of STARTALK, its free program for high school students (including incoming ninth-graders and newly graduated seniors) to learn Arabic or Mandarin Chinese. Classes, which will be taught by experienced native speakers, will teach communicative ability and cultural awareness. Students will receive eight college credits and will be prepared to start intermediate-level classes. The seven-week session of classes will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, June 23 through Aug. 7. There is a $50 registration fee, which can be waived for students with demonstrated financial need.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 29, 1995
HONG KONG -- Dressed in their navy blue uniforms and sporting closely cropped hair, the students at Queen's College high school hark back to when British rule was uncontested and the language of success was English.Success and power are about to be translated into another language: Mandarin Chinese.By 2000, Mandarin -- China's official national language -- will be compulsory in Hong Kong schools, even as much of the world adopts English as the language of science, commerce and popular culture.
TRAVEL
By JUNE SAWYERS | November 13, 2005
Beijing (Insight; $15.95) From the Forbidden City to Tiananmen Square, this guide offers an overview of the city that will host the Summer Olympics in 2008. The guide features essays on Beijing's population, religion (Daoism, Buddhism and Confucianism), food and drink (and culinary etiquette), the arts (including Beijing opera) and the Great Wall, as well as survival tips (look out for pickpockets; avoid street food not cooked in front of you). It includes listings of accommodations, nightlife and shopping areas.
NEWS
August 26, 1994
Joyce Chen, 76, who introduced much of America to Mandarin Chinese food through her restaurants, cookbook and TV show, died Tuesday of Alzheimer's disease in Lexington, Mass. Born in Beijing, she fled the Communist regime with her husband and children in 1949 and settled in Cambridge, Mass. In 1958 she opened the first Mandarin Chinese restaurant in New England.Harold Edward Montgomey, 52, a country music performer and father of country music star John Michael Montgomery, died of cancer Tuesday in Lancaster, Ky.Richard Pranke, 83, an FBI agent who raided the hide-outs of well-known 1930s gangsters such as Doc Barker and Alvin Karpis, died of a stroke Monday in St. Paul, Minn.
NEWS
March 24, 2005
Harry Laird Stallings, a retired electrical engineer, died of complications from diabetes and congestive heart failure Saturday at FutureCare Homewood. The longtime Bolton Hill resident was 79. Born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville, he was 1943 graduate of Catonsville High School. He worked at the Glenn L. Martin aircraft plant in Middle River before joining the Navy, which sent him to the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he received an electrical engineering degree, and then Drexel University in Philadelphia for his master's degree.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | December 25, 2006
Colin Lyman stood in front of his classmates with a color photograph of his family and spoke cautiously as he pointed to each face. "Baba, mama, didi, yeye, nainai, gege," said the 16-year- old junior at Columbia's Wilde Lake High School, identifying his father, mother, younger brother, grandfather, grandmother and older brother. His teacher, Wei-chuan Liu, nodded and then broke his momentum with a question in Mandarin Chinese. "I don't know what you are saying," Colin said, laughing.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | November 14, 2006
Timothy O'Donovan Evans, a linguist and former coordinator of the Maryland Business Center China, died of cancer Wednesday at Virginia Hospital Center in Arlington. The former Ruxton resident was 38. Mr. Evans was born in Baltimore and raised in Ruxton. He was a 1986 graduate of Loyola High School, where his fluency in Spanish, German and Portuguese earned him the school's top language award. "Even though he had an amazing memory and a natural gift for languages and politics, he still managed to watch a lot of terrible TV shows when we were in high school," said Steven R. Porter, a friend since seventh grade.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 29, 1995
HONG KONG -- Dressed in their navy blue uniforms and sporting closely cropped hair, the students at Queen's College high school hark back to when British rule was uncontested and the language of success was English.Success and power are about to be translated into another language: Mandarin Chinese.By 2000, Mandarin -- China's official national language -- will be compulsory in Hong Kong schools, even as much of the world adopts English as the language of science, commerce and popular culture.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
Anne Arundel Community College and the U.S. Naval Academy are offering a free summer Arabic immersion program for county students ages 16-25. Students must obtain a teacher's nomination for the program, which be held for four weeks beginning June 23 at the Naval Academy. Class run for seven hours each day, and students will receive individualized and group instruction in Arabic language, officials said. The program is open to students in and out of Anne Arundel County, but no housing or transportation is provided.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2003
During a recent Houston Rockets practice at the Compaq Center, the equipment manager caught a mouse and showed it to the team's 7-foot-5 rookie center, Yao Ming. Yao studied the mouse at length. Then, turning, he called to his teammate, Moochie Norris, the shortest player on the team at 6-1. Norris is nicknamed Mouse. "Hey, Moochie, your brother is here!" Colin Pine, the man who is Yao's public voice, laughs as he tells the story. "Yao has a wonderful relationship with his teammates," Pine said.
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