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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1998
John Frankenheimer doesn't see why more directors haven't split their time between movies and television. He has, with impressive results, including a string of Emmys and a handful of theatrical films that can legitimately be called classics.His latest entry in a career that extends over four decades is "Ronin," a post Cold-War thriller in which Robert De Niro leads a pack of leaderless mercenaries on a cat-and-mouse hunt through the narrow streets of southern France.Filled with the elements for which Frankenheimer has become renowned -- duplicitous spies, shadowy authority figures, intricate plotting -- "Ronin" is further proof that he is one of those rare directors whose work is truly timeless.
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NEWS
October 3, 2014
Columnist Jules Witcover claims that "many fellow Democrats" were of the opinion that President Barack Obama lacked a spine but that his recent call to the international community "to step up to the challenge of global terrorism" now suggests he has acquired one ( "U.N. speech may indicate a tougher Obama," Sept. 29). In my opinion President Obama has always had a spine. For example, while still a senator he condemned the madness of the Bush administration's wars. Later he called for closing down the Guantanamo concentration camp.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 30, 2004
Jonathan Demme's remake of The Manchurian Candidate says as much about the politics of the times as the 1962 original did, maybe even more. And while the new version may not say it as thrillingly, it is a lot more brazen and up front in its message, a shift in focus that says volumes about the political climate in 2004. When John Frankenheimer made the original Manchurian in 1962, the United States was unified in a war one could not see, only feel - promoting a Cold War mentality that made the film, detailing a plot by the Communists to subvert the electoral process and plant one of their own in the White House, all the more chilling, not to mention unsettlingly close to home.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 9, 2005
New York-- Jeffrey Wright at age 40 is an actor's actor - and a director's actor, too. He nearly steals the three-part story line of Syriana as a buttoned-up, prematurely aged lawyer. But in conversation, Wright emphasizes how moviemaker Stephen Gaghan contrasts the actor's portrait of a man working the system to George Clooney's hung-out-to-dry CIA agent and Matt Damon's mournful financial analyst, who becomes the economic brain for a progressive Arab prince while in grief over the death of a son. "All are processed by the [social-political]
NEWS
April 10, 1996
...TC Richard Condon, 81, author of 'Manchurian Candidate'Best-selling author Richard Condon, whose novel of political paranoia "The Manchurian Candidate" suddenly became frighteningly realistic after President John F. Kennedy was assassinated, died yesterday in Dallas. He was 81.Mr. Condon, who died of kidney failure, saw "The Manchurian Candidate" and another of his novels, the darkly comic "Prizzi's Honor," made into acclaimed movies.Many other novels by him had a strong satirical, anti-establishment bent: "The Oldest Confession," "Some Angry Angel," "Emperor of America," "A Talent for Loving," "Winter Kills" and "An Infinity of Mirrors."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Melody Holmes | January 6, 2000
Choral tribute to King On Sunday, the Choral Arts Society of Washington will present its 12th annual choral tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at the Kennedy Center. Featured acts include the Children's Chorus of Washington, The BET (Black Entertainment Television) Urban Nation Hip Hop Choir and the Church of God in Christ Combined Choirs. There also will be a free lecture before the concert, featuring civil rights activist, singer and storyteller Jack Landron. The lecture begins at 6:15 p.m., the concert at 7:30 p.m. The Kennedy Center is off Virginia and New Hampshire avenues Northwest, Washington.
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By Chris Kaltenbach | August 27, 1997
TNT offers a double dose of presidential paranoia tonight, courtesy of director John Frankenheimer (whose most recent work, "George Wallace," debuted on TNT last weekend). Both are taut, suspenseful and pretty much guaranteed to hook you, once started, into watching the whole thing.First up is "The Manchurian Candidate" (8 p.m.-10: 45 p.m.), with Laurence Harvey as a brainwashed Korean War vet with his sights set on the White House. Frank Sinatra is the commanding officer whose brain has been similarly programmed, although perhaps not as well.
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By Deborah Hornblow and Deborah Hornblow,HARTFORD COURANT | August 2, 2004
Over the years, American cinema has played host to a variety of bad guys. From tomahawk-wielding Indians to goose-stepping Nazis, Cold War communists, Italian mobsters and Japanese fighters, celluloid public enemies have tended to reflect and define chapters of our nation's history. In recent times, a climate of political correctness has made movie enemies harder to come by. Communists no longer generate much fear. Japanese fighters have become the heroes of martial-arts pictures. Nazis are still reliably evil, as they were most recently in Hellboy, but stereotypical images of Native Americans, Asians, Italians, Arabs, Muslims and other ethnic, religious or political groups open filmmakers to charges of cultural insensitivity.
NEWS
October 3, 2014
Columnist Jules Witcover claims that "many fellow Democrats" were of the opinion that President Barack Obama lacked a spine but that his recent call to the international community "to step up to the challenge of global terrorism" now suggests he has acquired one ( "U.N. speech may indicate a tougher Obama," Sept. 29). In my opinion President Obama has always had a spine. For example, while still a senator he condemned the madness of the Bush administration's wars. Later he called for closing down the Guantanamo concentration camp.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 7, 2000
It's official: There will be a "Blair Witch Project 2." In fact, there will be a "Blair Witch Project 3." Artisan Entertainment and Haxan Films announced this week that the sequel to the blockbuster independent hit "The Blair Witch Project" will start filming by March, for release next fall. Award-winning documentarian Joe Berlinger ("Brother's Keeper," "Paradise Lost") will direct the film in his feature debut. Artisan and Berlinger are keeping mum about the sequel's storyline, but the movie is likely to be shot in rural Maryland, as was the first movie.
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By Deborah Hornblow and Deborah Hornblow,HARTFORD COURANT | August 2, 2004
Over the years, American cinema has played host to a variety of bad guys. From tomahawk-wielding Indians to goose-stepping Nazis, Cold War communists, Italian mobsters and Japanese fighters, celluloid public enemies have tended to reflect and define chapters of our nation's history. In recent times, a climate of political correctness has made movie enemies harder to come by. Communists no longer generate much fear. Japanese fighters have become the heroes of martial-arts pictures. Nazis are still reliably evil, as they were most recently in Hellboy, but stereotypical images of Native Americans, Asians, Italians, Arabs, Muslims and other ethnic, religious or political groups open filmmakers to charges of cultural insensitivity.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 30, 2004
Jonathan Demme's remake of The Manchurian Candidate says as much about the politics of the times as the 1962 original did, maybe even more. And while the new version may not say it as thrillingly, it is a lot more brazen and up front in its message, a shift in focus that says volumes about the political climate in 2004. When John Frankenheimer made the original Manchurian in 1962, the United States was unified in a war one could not see, only feel - promoting a Cold War mentality that made the film, detailing a plot by the Communists to subvert the electoral process and plant one of their own in the White House, all the more chilling, not to mention unsettlingly close to home.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 27, 2003
George Axelrod, the screenwriter and sometime director who died Saturday at age 81, had his name on the scripts of several icon-generating movies, including The Seven Year Itch (1955), Bus Stop (1956), and Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961). He also produced, directed and wrote the disreputable crazy-comedy classic Lord Love a Duck (1966). But his main claim to posterity is the subversive political suspense film The Manchurian Candidate (1962). It's one of the few "trick" movies that builds in entertainment value even after its tricks are revealed - and even after repeated viewings.
NEWS
June 23, 2003
George Axelrod, 81, the playwright who anticipated the sexual revolution with The Seven Year Itch and later wrote screenplays for such films as Breakfast at Tiffany's and The Manchurian Candidate, died of heart failure Saturday in Los Angeles. A radio and television writer, Mr. Axelrod hit the jackpot in 1952 with The Seven Year Itch, a laugh-filled play about adultery. The play lasted almost three years on Broadway and was filmed by 20th Century Fox as a vehicle for Marilyn Monroe. His next play, Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter?
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 4, 2003
Writer Larry Cohen and director Joel Schumacher are moviemaking veterans, but the only question their new movie raises is: How many bad undergraduate ideas can you stuff in a phone booth? In Phone Booth, Colin Farrell plays a New York City publicist who merrily hypes his clients by any means necessary, whether maneuvering slick-mag editors against each other to win a cover or lying to Page Six to plant an item. Before you can say "Tony Curtis in Sweet Smell of Success," a sniper pins him down in the title booth and makes Farrell look as though he's a murderer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and By Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | July 14, 2002
American filmmaking has lost two pioneers of its iconoclastic postwar sensibility -- that adult brand of social rebellion, emotional experimentation and aesthetic adventure that ruffled the surface of the Eisenhower years and peaked before the counterculture. Director John Frankenheimer, 72, died of a stroke after spinal surgery on July 6; actor Rod Steiger, 77, died of pneumonia and kidney failure on Tuesday. In the era of live television, they burst into a cathode-ray version of the limelight -- Steiger with his offbeat starring role as the lovelorn butcher in Paddy Chayefsky's Marty (1953)
NEWS
June 23, 2003
George Axelrod, 81, the playwright who anticipated the sexual revolution with The Seven Year Itch and later wrote screenplays for such films as Breakfast at Tiffany's and The Manchurian Candidate, died of heart failure Saturday in Los Angeles. A radio and television writer, Mr. Axelrod hit the jackpot in 1952 with The Seven Year Itch, a laugh-filled play about adultery. The play lasted almost three years on Broadway and was filmed by 20th Century Fox as a vehicle for Marilyn Monroe. His next play, Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter?
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 9, 2005
New York-- Jeffrey Wright at age 40 is an actor's actor - and a director's actor, too. He nearly steals the three-part story line of Syriana as a buttoned-up, prematurely aged lawyer. But in conversation, Wright emphasizes how moviemaker Stephen Gaghan contrasts the actor's portrait of a man working the system to George Clooney's hung-out-to-dry CIA agent and Matt Damon's mournful financial analyst, who becomes the economic brain for a progressive Arab prince while in grief over the death of a son. "All are processed by the [social-political]
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 7, 2000
It's official: There will be a "Blair Witch Project 2." In fact, there will be a "Blair Witch Project 3." Artisan Entertainment and Haxan Films announced this week that the sequel to the blockbuster independent hit "The Blair Witch Project" will start filming by March, for release next fall. Award-winning documentarian Joe Berlinger ("Brother's Keeper," "Paradise Lost") will direct the film in his feature debut. Artisan and Berlinger are keeping mum about the sequel's storyline, but the movie is likely to be shot in rural Maryland, as was the first movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Melody Holmes | January 6, 2000
Choral tribute to King On Sunday, the Choral Arts Society of Washington will present its 12th annual choral tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at the Kennedy Center. Featured acts include the Children's Chorus of Washington, The BET (Black Entertainment Television) Urban Nation Hip Hop Choir and the Church of God in Christ Combined Choirs. There also will be a free lecture before the concert, featuring civil rights activist, singer and storyteller Jack Landron. The lecture begins at 6:15 p.m., the concert at 7:30 p.m. The Kennedy Center is off Virginia and New Hampshire avenues Northwest, Washington.
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