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Manchester Elementary

NEWS
By PAT BRODOWSKI | October 21, 1992
Kindergartners at Spring Garden and Manchester elementary schools released dozens of tiger-striped monarch butterflies last week. As the creatures fluttered over neighboring flower beds, their instinctive migration had begun.They'll travel south along the Appalachian Ridge and spend the winter in Mexico, said Spring Garden Elementary teacher Sylvia Griswold, and we might see them in the spring. Her students had watched the butterflies develop in their classroom. The release finished their study.
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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2000
A Manchester farmhand accused of trying to lure a 6-year-old Manchester girl into a pickup truck at her bus stop is being held in lieu of $250,000 bail at the county detention center. David Lee Simpson, 32, of the 3600 block of Schalk Road No. 1 was arrested Friday evening and held without bail after being charged on counts of attempting to kidnap a minor under 16 and attempting to abduct a minor under 12. Judge Louis A. Becker, visiting Carroll County District Court from Howard County, said he understood the parents were concerned about the safety of their daughter and other children, but that he had no authority to deny bail.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | January 13, 1991
Patricia Jordan of Millers isn't thrilled about the prospect of her 5-year-old daughter spending more time on a school bus."From the time the school bell rings until she walks in our door, it's 45 minutes," said Jordan of her daughter's daily trips to and from Manchester Elementary School.With the Carroll Board of Education's decision to redraw boundary lines for elementary schools in the northeastern part of the county,though, Jordan's daughter, Nicole, will spend even more time on the school bus. School officials estimated another five minutes.
NEWS
September 11, 2002
The Hampstead Town Hall Art Gallery is displaying Sam Gunby's photography through Oct. 31. Gunby owns and operates Scenic Views Photography. He has been taking photographs for 25 years. He also owned and operated for six years a photography studio that specialized in weddings, portraits and commercial work. His travels led him to expand into scenic photography. Now, his photos focus on lighthouses, old mills, waterfalls, landscapes, steam trains and local city scenes. The Town Hall is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays at 1034 S. Carroll St. Information: 410-239-7408.
EXPLORE
January 26, 2012
It was encouraging to read that a group of residents in Eldersburg and Sykesville were able to attract county officials and Jeff Degitz, the director of the county's Department of Recreation and Parks, to form a group to decide future trails in the South Carroll area. It appears this group, with support of county resources, will develop a feasibility study to obtain grant funding for trails that will serve residents in the local area. This will allow many of the unique destinations along the routes 26 and 32 corridors to be tied together, allowing citizens a healthy, safe and cost-saving alternative to travel by auto.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2005
About noon every day, while sitting in social studies, Dakota Beatty's stomach begins to grumble. That's because Dakota isn't scheduled to have lunch until 1:05 p.m. at Manchester Elementary, about six hours after the bowl of Cheerios he usually eats for breakfast. He says he is so hungry during social studies that his stomach aches, he can't concentrate and his handwriting grows increasingly sloppy. "My whole class wants an earlier lunch," said Dakota, a fourth-grader. The flip side of the problem is pupils eating as early as 10:40 a.m. at some Carroll schools, about five hours before the end of the school day. School officials acknowledge that many pupils are eating lunch earlier and later as principals struggle with growing enrollments and do what they can to wedge more pupils into cafeterias that weren't built for so many children.
NEWS
By Heather Reese and Heather Reese,Contributing Writer | May 3, 1995
Manchester has unveiled "Charlotte's Quest for the Outside World," a nature center for the students and residents of Manchester.The name, chosen by the Manchester elementary school children, serves two purposes, said Acting Town Manager David Warner: "First, it was named for Charlotte Collett, a councilwoman who has been the visionary and a person who brought the nature center to reality. The other part is because it is a nature center. And a nature center is to learn about the outside world."
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2004
With milk jugs, nets and high spirits, the fourth-graders in Betty L. Smith's science classes descended upon an outdoor laboratory that is only a short walk from their classroom at Manchester Elementary School. Forest, meadow, bogs, ponds and streams waited to be discovered - along with several miles of trails in the 69 acres that constitute Pine Valley Park and Charlotte's Quest Nature Center. "It's Manchester's Central Park," said Smith, who has served for six years on the board of the nonprofit Manchester Parks Foundation.
NEWS
By PAT BRODOWSKI | April 6, 1994
Arbor Day is the day when towns across America plant trees to be enjoyed by generations to come. It will happen Monday in Manchester.Students from Manchester Elementary School will help plant a white oak, Manchester's official town tree, by the school marquee on York Street. With the Manchester Tree Commission and possibly Mayor Earl A. J. "Tim" Warehime Jr. in attendance, the oak will be planted at 2 p.m. on Monday. The rain date is April 13."In my day, Arbor Day was always handled by the school," recalls Manchester Councilwoman Charlotte Collett of the Manchester Tree Commission.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2004
With milk jugs, nets and high spirits, the fourth-graders in Betty L. Smith's science classes descended upon an outdoor laboratory that is only a short walk from their classroom at Manchester Elementary School. Forest, meadow, bogs, ponds and streams waited to be discovered - along with several miles of trails in the 69 acres that constitute Pine Valley Park and Charlotte's Quest Nature Center. "It's Manchester's Central Park," said Smith, who has served for six years on the board of the nonprofit Manchester Parks Foundation.
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