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Manchester Elementary

NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | August 25, 1991
At age 5, Gloria Horneff knew she wanted to be a teacher.What she didn't know was that one day she would be top administrator of a new elementary school in South Carroll."
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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2000
A Manchester farmhand accused of trying to lure a 6-year-old Manchester girl into a pickup truck at her bus stop is being held in lieu of $250,000 bail at the county detention center. David Lee Simpson, 32, of the 3600 block of Schalk Road No. 1 was arrested Friday evening and held without bail after being charged on counts of attempting to kidnap a minor under 16 and attempting to abduct a minor under 12. Judge Louis A. Becker, visiting Carroll County District Court from Howard County, said he understood the parents were concerned about the safety of their daughter and other children, but that he had no authority to deny bail.
NEWS
By PAT BRODOWSKI | October 21, 1992
Kindergartners at Spring Garden and Manchester elementary schools released dozens of tiger-striped monarch butterflies last week. As the creatures fluttered over neighboring flower beds, their instinctive migration had begun.They'll travel south along the Appalachian Ridge and spend the winter in Mexico, said Spring Garden Elementary teacher Sylvia Griswold, and we might see them in the spring. Her students had watched the butterflies develop in their classroom. The release finished their study.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | May 15, 1994
The state's chief executive favors cereal with a banana sliced on top.But any healthy breakfast will do, he told Manchester Elementary School students Friday.Gov. William Donald Schaefer didn't tell them much that was new to them; the students were enthusiastic enough about the first meal of the day to have won a statewide contest. The competition, sponsored by the State Department of Education's nutrition unit, was for increasing participation in the breakfast program.The number of students eating school breakfasts at Manchester Elementary increased 94 percent in six months.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 12, 1997
FEELING HOUSEBOUND? Wishing for an inexpensive day out with the kids? Winterfest at Manchester Elementary School might be the answer.From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, the school cafeteria and gymnasium will become a carnival grounds complete with games, door prizes and all of your children's favorite foodstuffs. Parking will be available at the school or Fire Department carnival grounds.This is Manchester Elementary School's first winter carnival. The PTA chose a winter event in hopes of attracting parent volunteers who have been too busy with spring sports to help during a May festival.
NEWS
September 11, 2002
The Hampstead Town Hall Art Gallery is displaying Sam Gunby's photography through Oct. 31. Gunby owns and operates Scenic Views Photography. He has been taking photographs for 25 years. He also owned and operated for six years a photography studio that specialized in weddings, portraits and commercial work. His travels led him to expand into scenic photography. Now, his photos focus on lighthouses, old mills, waterfalls, landscapes, steam trains and local city scenes. The Town Hall is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays at 1034 S. Carroll St. Information: 410-239-7408.
EXPLORE
January 26, 2012
It was encouraging to read that a group of residents in Eldersburg and Sykesville were able to attract county officials and Jeff Degitz, the director of the county's Department of Recreation and Parks, to form a group to decide future trails in the South Carroll area. It appears this group, with support of county resources, will develop a feasibility study to obtain grant funding for trails that will serve residents in the local area. This will allow many of the unique destinations along the routes 26 and 32 corridors to be tied together, allowing citizens a healthy, safe and cost-saving alternative to travel by auto.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2005
About noon every day, while sitting in social studies, Dakota Beatty's stomach begins to grumble. That's because Dakota isn't scheduled to have lunch until 1:05 p.m. at Manchester Elementary, about six hours after the bowl of Cheerios he usually eats for breakfast. He says he is so hungry during social studies that his stomach aches, he can't concentrate and his handwriting grows increasingly sloppy. "My whole class wants an earlier lunch," said Dakota, a fourth-grader. The flip side of the problem is pupils eating as early as 10:40 a.m. at some Carroll schools, about five hours before the end of the school day. School officials acknowledge that many pupils are eating lunch earlier and later as principals struggle with growing enrollments and do what they can to wedge more pupils into cafeterias that weren't built for so many children.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,SUN STAFF | March 31, 1996
When entomologist Marty A. Condon had trouble distinguishing among three species of fruit fly, she sought the advice of a rarely consulted group of scientists -- 10 Manchester Elementary fifth-graders.Not only did the students identify differences among the flies, but they developed a theory that allowed scientists to identify the insects in the Venezuelan jungle accurately.Now, four years later, the fly -- a variety that feeds on rain forest cucumber -- has been named the Blepharoneura manchesteri or, loosely translated, the eyelash vein fly of Manchester.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | April 6, 1995
Call it an honor roll for custodians.Three Carroll County schools have earned "superior" ratings from state inspectors for buildings that are clean, safe and strong. Only eight schools in Maryland achieved that rating this year.Carroll's are Piney Ridge and Manchester elementary schools, and Carroll Springs School.At the State House yesterday, Gov. Parris N. Glendening greeted the schools' building supervisors, who learned of their honor in January.Robert Conaway, the county school system's supervisor of maintenance, and two of the principals also attended the reception.
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