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By Glenn Garvin and Glenn Garvin,MIAMI HERALD | February 23, 1999
MANAGUA, Nicaragua -- Uh-oh, another victim riding to certain doom. Clear across the shopping mall, you can see the terror in her eyes, a middle-aged woman frozen on the metal stairs as they glide upward, upward -- and now, with the end near, she leaps!Skidding across the floor of the food court, she knocks over a large metal ashtray, spilling sand everywhere, before coming safely (sort of) to rest against a wall.Bystanders, pursing their lips, nod appreciatively. One more brave Nicaraguan has survived her first trip on an escalator.
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TRAVEL
By Jason George and Jason George,Chicago Tribune | July 15, 2007
GRANADA, NICARAGUA / / Boomtown fever is often followed by nostalgia for the way of life that just disappeared. Rapid change usually means rapid loss of charm. Tourism boomtowns are, of course, no exception, and the world brims with overbuilt locations where it's now impossible to find what led folks to flock there in the first place. (Cabo San Lucas, can you hear me?) Nicaragua's colonial gem of Granada, and its lakeside cobblestone streets, has thankfully not yet lost its character, but it doesn't take long here to see that nearly every block features a new hotel or a building for sale.
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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | April 20, 1992
MANAGUA, Nicaragua -- Scores of poor and ailing pilgrims are arriving at a shack in Managua where a man with a scruffy beard and army boots has taken the name Jesus and says he can heal the sick and make blind people see.The man, Marcos Antonio Bonilla, entered a bustling Managua market a few weeks before Easter and announced he is the son of God.Since then, newspapers and radio stations linked to the leftist Sandinista Front have given Mr. Bonilla extensive...
NEWS
By Glenn Garvin and Glenn Garvin,MIAMI HERALD | February 23, 1999
MANAGUA, Nicaragua -- Uh-oh, another victim riding to certain doom. Clear across the shopping mall, you can see the terror in her eyes, a middle-aged woman frozen on the metal stairs as they glide upward, upward -- and now, with the end near, she leaps!Skidding across the floor of the food court, she knocks over a large metal ashtray, spilling sand everywhere, before coming safely (sort of) to rest against a wall.Bystanders, pursing their lips, nod appreciatively. One more brave Nicaraguan has survived her first trip on an escalator.
TRAVEL
By Jason George and Jason George,Chicago Tribune | July 15, 2007
GRANADA, NICARAGUA / / Boomtown fever is often followed by nostalgia for the way of life that just disappeared. Rapid change usually means rapid loss of charm. Tourism boomtowns are, of course, no exception, and the world brims with overbuilt locations where it's now impossible to find what led folks to flock there in the first place. (Cabo San Lucas, can you hear me?) Nicaragua's colonial gem of Granada, and its lakeside cobblestone streets, has thankfully not yet lost its character, but it doesn't take long here to see that nearly every block features a new hotel or a building for sale.
TOPIC
By Juan O. Tamayo | January 31, 1999
MANAGUA, Nicaragua -- The Rev. Ernesto Cardenal still gets huffy when he's asked about that famous image: Pope John Paul II wagging a finger at Cardenal as the priest knelt before him."Meaningless," Cardenal snapped, though that scene from 16 years ago came to symbolize the bitter fight between the pontiff and Roman Catholic theologians who advocated "a preferential option for the poor.""I am still a revolutionary who defends the poor. And liberation theology is in crisis. Capitalism won. Period.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | December 12, 1991
Managua, Nicaragua IN THE midst of the alarming poverty and violence of today's post-Sandinista Nicaragua, President Violeta Chamorro's presidential office is a magical oasis of beauty and peace."
NEWS
By Knight Ridder News Service | August 31, 1992
MANAGUA -- A U.S. Senate panel's report on Nicaragua paints a picture of a government riddled with nepotism that doles out fat loans to friends without expecting repayment.The report says President Violeta Chamorro's top aide may be profiteering off U.S. donations, buying votes in the Nicaraguan Congress and backing a Sandinista army chief who is stashing millions in bank accounts in Canada.The broad allegations, often supported by unnamed sources or based on press accounts, begin with a demand by the Republican staff of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee for stricter oversight of U.S. aid to Nicaragua.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 15, 1996
MANAGUA, Nicaragua -- Never mind that he was raised here %% and is now general manager of the Nicaraguan Post Office. Just like the other 1.5 million residents of this city whose streets have no names and no numbers, Jose Ernesto Gonzalez often has trouble finding his way around town. %%%% "In Managua, everybody gets lost all the time, even mailmen, firemen and the police, because the way we figure out addresses is so chaotic and illogical," Gonzalez said. "Every time I go out, I have problems; so imagine how hard it must be for tourists or someone from the countryside."
NEWS
September 10, 1994
Fernando Chamorro Rappaccioli, 62, a Nicaraguan guerrilla leader who fought both the United States-backed dictatorship of Anastasio Somoza and the Sandinista government that replaced died Tuesday in Managua, Nicaragua, of complications from an embolism that paralyzed him two years ago.Cassandra Marie Gouzd, whose courage won the admiration of first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, died Tuesday of leukemia in Morgantown, W.Va. She was 9. Cassie met with Mrs. Clinton during a 1993 health care forum at West Virginia University and gave her a handmade jewelry box.Edna Manilow, 70, the mother of singer-songwriter Barry Manilow, died of cancer Thursday in Palm Beach, Fla.Frederick Manfred, 82, who wrote "Lord Grizzly," and other novels in the Buckskin Man series, died Wednesday in Luverne, Minn.
TOPIC
By Juan O. Tamayo | January 31, 1999
MANAGUA, Nicaragua -- The Rev. Ernesto Cardenal still gets huffy when he's asked about that famous image: Pope John Paul II wagging a finger at Cardenal as the priest knelt before him."Meaningless," Cardenal snapped, though that scene from 16 years ago came to symbolize the bitter fight between the pontiff and Roman Catholic theologians who advocated "a preferential option for the poor.""I am still a revolutionary who defends the poor. And liberation theology is in crisis. Capitalism won. Period.
NEWS
By Knight Ridder News Service | August 31, 1992
MANAGUA -- A U.S. Senate panel's report on Nicaragua paints a picture of a government riddled with nepotism that doles out fat loans to friends without expecting repayment.The report says President Violeta Chamorro's top aide may be profiteering off U.S. donations, buying votes in the Nicaraguan Congress and backing a Sandinista army chief who is stashing millions in bank accounts in Canada.The broad allegations, often supported by unnamed sources or based on press accounts, begin with a demand by the Republican staff of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee for stricter oversight of U.S. aid to Nicaragua.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | April 20, 1992
MANAGUA, Nicaragua -- Scores of poor and ailing pilgrims are arriving at a shack in Managua where a man with a scruffy beard and army boots has taken the name Jesus and says he can heal the sick and make blind people see.The man, Marcos Antonio Bonilla, entered a bustling Managua market a few weeks before Easter and announced he is the son of God.Since then, newspapers and radio stations linked to the leftist Sandinista Front have given Mr. Bonilla extensive...
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | December 12, 1991
Managua, Nicaragua IN THE midst of the alarming poverty and violence of today's post-Sandinista Nicaragua, President Violeta Chamorro's presidential office is a magical oasis of beauty and peace."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 22, 1991
DOES ANYONE remember Nicaragua? Where U.S.-backe rebels that former President Reagan likened to our Founding Fathers were fighting communism? "Our side" won, but the average Nicaraguan is no better off, and U.S. indifference is partly to blame.That is what prompted President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro to come to the U.S. [last] week on her first visit since being elected in 1990 -- to remind President Bush and Congress that her country is still desperate for U.S. aid. But does anyone remember Mrs. Chamorro?
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 18, 1993
MANAGUA, Nicaragua -- The prostitutes stalking the streets that ring the volcanic hills and craters of this gritty capital are young -- very young. Some have barely reached their teens. Some say they are selling sex to feed their starving siblings. Some say they were sent to this job by their unemployed, single mothers."I try to help them," says the Rev. Xabier Gorostiaga, rector of the Jesuit University of Central America. "I tell them I can give them a scholarship to the university. But they say, 'I already have a scholarship to the university.
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