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By Mike Klingaman and Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2013
Earl Weaver penned his own epitaph. “On my tombstone just write, 'The sorest loser that ever lived,' “ he once said. Weaver, the Orioles' chain-smoking, umpire-baiting, tomato-growing manager who led the team to four American League pennants and the 1970 world championship in his 17 years here, died late Friday night while on a baseball-themed cruise. The Orioles confirmed his death Saturday morning but did not release a cause. The Hall of Famer, who lived in Pembroke Pines, Fla., was 82. “Earl Weaver stands alone as the greatest manager in the history of the Orioles organization and one of the greatest in the history of baseball,” Orioles owner Peter Angelos said in a statement.
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SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
They call them the unwritten rules of baseball, but Orioles manager Buck Showalter obviously thinks even unwritten rules are made to be broken. He ordered an intentional walk to slumping Bryce Harper in the eighth inning Thursday night, even though the Washington Nationals left fielder represented the potential go-ahead run in a one-run ballgame. That's a classic no-no if you believe in old-school managerial strategy, but Showalter turned baseball convention on its ear, and did it with an opposing hitter who came to the plate with just one hit in his past 20 at-bats.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2012
William Bruce Schneck, former manager of space shuttle Columbia's communications network, died June 17 of a massive heart attack at Chester River Hospital Center in Chestertown. The Shady Side resident was 59. The son of a Glenn L. Martin Co. quality control engineer and a Baltimore public school cafeteria manager, Mr. Schneck was born in Baltimore and raised in Dundalk. He was a 1970 graduate of Patapsco High School, and after attending a Baltimore technical school for a year, went to work in 1972 for Honeywell Technology Solutions Inc. Mr. Schneck, a contract employee who worked at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt for more than 35 years, retired in 2005.
SPORTS
By Alejandro Zuniga and The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
WASHINGTON -- Washington Nationals manager Matt Williams has seen Buck Showalter make bold late-game decisions before. The Orioles manager, who was the Arizona Diamondbacks' skipper and coached Williams there from 1998-2000, once made one of the gutsiest calls in baseball history. On May 28, 1998, Showalter's Diamondbacks were clinging to a two-run lead in the bottom of the ninth with the bases loaded and Barry Bonds stepping to the plate. Instead of pitching to the powerful San Francisco Giants slugger, Showalter elected to walk him intentionally and concede a run.  The next batter, Brent Mayne, worked a full count and then lined out to deep right-center field, sealing a Diamondbacks win. “It takes a great deal of intestinal fortitude, I guess is the right way to put it, to do something like that,” Williams said before Monday's game.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
Steve Buttry has been posting a series of articles at The Buttry Diary offering advice to top editors. All are instructive, but the latest, on dealing firmly with staff problems , is particularly valuable. If you are a manager at any level, you would do well to examine how he lays out various situations and how he suggests dealing with them. I append a few comments of my own. In journalism, most managers, regrettably, fall into two categories: bullies and cowards. This I have seen at two newspapers myself, and have heard reports from colleagues at scores of others.
SPORTS
By Adam Kilgore, The Washington Post | June 26, 2011
Davey Johnson, a former Orioles manager and player, will become the next manager of the Washington Nationals and will manage them at least through the 2011 season, general manager Mike Rizzo said on the national broadcast of Saturday's game against the Chicago White Sox. The move completes a surreal two days by placing one of the most accomplished managers of this generation at the helm of baseball's hottest team. Rizzo said the completion of Johnson's contract amounted to "dotting the i's and crossing the t's. " Rizzo also said Johnson will travel with the Nationals to Anaheim, Calif., where he will manage his first game Monday.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
James F. Bray, a retired grocery store manager, died Tuesday of an aneurysm at his Jessup home. He was 76. Mr. Bray was born in Virginia and raised in North Carolina and Baltimore, where he graduated from city public schools. He served in the Army for three months and was honorably discharged in 1958. Mr. Bray worked for Food Fair and later as an evening grocery manager at Pantry Pride from 1952 to 1981, when he retired. During the 1980s, he worked for several years for Valu Food as a manager.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2012
Carey Howell Taylor, a retired Bethlehem Steel Corp. manager, died Jan. 27 of pneumonia at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 84. The son of the superintendent of secondary education for city public schools and a homemaker, Mr. Taylor was born in Baltimore and raised in Mount Washington. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1944, he studied engineering at the University of North Carolina and Penn State University for two years, before enlisting in the Navy in 1947. He then completed his education, earning a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering in 1950 from the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
January 9, 2014
As a good friend of Bishop Robinson, I read with interest Fred Rasmussen 's obituary of the former Baltimore City police chief ( "Bishop Lee Robinson Sr., city's first black police commissioner, dies at 86," Jan. 6). There was another part of Bishop's career that was omitted. For approximately 10 years, from the time he served as secretary of the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services until his 70th birthday, we were privileged to have him serve as a director of Mercantile Bankshares Corp.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
They call them the unwritten rules of baseball, but Orioles manager Buck Showalter obviously thinks even unwritten rules are made to be broken. He ordered an intentional walk to slumping Bryce Harper in the eighth inning Thursday night, even though the Washington Nationals left fielder represented the potential go-ahead run in a one-run ballgame. That's a classic no-no if you believe in old-school managerial strategy, but Showalter turned baseball convention on its ear, and did it with an opposing hitter who came to the plate with just one hit in his past 20 at-bats.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
Alice S. Lumpkin, an environmentalist and animal lover who with her husband owned and managed their Worthington Valley farm, died Saturday of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. She was 52. The daughter of Dr. Samuel McComb Lumpkin, an ear, nose and throat specialist, and Barbara Seney Waters Lumpkin, a homemaker, Alice Seney Lumpkin was born in Baltimore and raised in Sparks and on Geist Road in Glyndon. After graduating in 1979 from Garrison Forest School, she earned a bachelor's degree in geology with an environmental option from Colby College in Waterville, Maine, in 1984.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2014
Management at the Baltimore jail held "town hall meetings" with Black Guerrilla Family gang members to get tips on how to better operate the institution, a former corrections officer told the FBI as part of a wide-ranging corruption investigation. The allegation, contained in recently filed court documents, is the latest portrayal of the gang's extensive influence at the jail before federal authorities stepped in last year. Since then, 14 corrections officers and 10 gang members have pleaded guilty.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
William Goldsborough Helfrich III, who helped with the operation and management of a handful of downtown restaurants, died June 21 in La Jolla, Calif., after suffering multiple organ failure. He was 38. Born in Arlington Heights, Ill., Mr. Helfrich - known as Will to friends and family - lived in Kansas City before moving to Baltimore with his family in 1983 and settling in Roland Park. He attended Gilman School from second grade until graduating with the Class of 1994. While at Gilman, he earned two varsity letters in football, playing tight end, and two more as the baseball team's third baseman.
NEWS
June 30, 2014
In a recent commentary published in The Sun, Morgan State University President David Wilson described in glowing terms a multimillion-dollar NASA grant his institution won three years ago to conduct advanced climate and Earth sciences research. Mr. Wilson called the contract, which could total $28.5 million over five years, the largest federal research grant ever awarded Morgan and a milestone in the school's quest for national recognition as a major research institution. He dismissed as mere "glitches" and "growing pains" any compliance issues Morgan had experienced in administering the grant.
SPORTS
By Alejandro Zuniga and The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
In a battle of minor league pitchers promoted for the afternoon game of Friday's day-night doubleheader, the Tampa Bay Rays' Alex Colome bested the Orioles' Kevin Gausman. And it wasn't close. Colome (1-0), who has spent much of the season with Triple-A Durham, flummoxed the Orioles after a shaky first inning as the Rays cruised to a 5-2 win before an announced 15,614 at Camden Yards. In his first major league start of the year, the right-hander allowed just two hits and exited with a four-run lead in the sixth.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
NEW YORK - Thursday's day off allowed the Orioles to rest their six-man bullpen, but it didn't exactly clear up questions surrounding the pitching staff. Orioles manager Buck Showalter hasn't announced his starting pitchers after this Yankees series - Bud Norris is scheduled for Saturday afternoon and Chris Tillman for the series finale Sunday - but it appears Showalter will continue to go with a six-man rotation, even though he's been unwilling to call it that. On Friday afternoon, Miguel Gonzalez and Tillman each threw side sessions, but left-hander Wei-Yin Chen didn't, making him available to pitch in long relief Friday night.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
Amelia J. Brooks, a retired store manager and active church member, died Feb. 16 from heart failure at a daughter's home in Buford, Ga. The former longtime West Baltimore resident was 90. The daughter of a cobbler and a housekeeper, the former Amelia Juanita Soden was born in Baltimore and raised near Harlem Park. Mrs. Brooks was a 1941 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School and at an early age began attending church at Union Baptist Church and Douglas Memorial Baptist Church.
NEWS
By Matt Vensel | June 13, 2011
You know those amazing videos we see of minor-league managers flipping out and getting ejected from games in emphatic fashion ? We can now add Norfolk Tides manager Gary Allenson to the highlight reel. In Sunday’s 11-5 win over Durham, the manager of the Orioles’ Triple-A affiliate took objection to a home run getting switched to a ground-rule double by the umps. So Allenson sauntered out to the warning track, scaled the outfield wall and started looking for more phantom ground-rule doubles in the shrubbery in center field.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
When the topic is coffee, a debate always seems a split second away. Obsessives argue over beans, equipment and, of course, where to drink it. We all have favorite spots for different reasons. In Hampden, the picturesque Artifact Coffee plays a whimsical foil to the adventurous, no-frills Spro. The Daily Grind in Fells Point can get you in and out quickly. I have never had a bad cup of anything at the relatively new Tribeca Coffee Roasters in Mount Vernon, either, and that is just to name a percentage of the city's viable options.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- Catcher Matt Wieters underwent successful Tommy John elbow ligament reconstruction surgery, performed by renowned orthopedist Dr. James Andrews in Gulf Breeze, on Tuesday afternoon. Wieters will miss the rest of this season, but the Orioles are hopeful he will be ready to return by Opening Day next year. A position player's estimated recovery time from the surgery is nine months. In the procedure, the palmaris longus tendon on the palm side of his right wrist was removed to reconstruct the ulnar collateral ligament in his right elbow.
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