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By Blair Kerkhoff and The Kansas City Star | October 8, 2014
Before he brushes his teeth in the morning these days, Royals manager Ned Yost reminds himself of one thing. “Before I even get out of bed, I tell myself, 'Let's have fun today,'” Yost said. “Remember where you're at and let's have fun.” These are the best of times for Yost, in his fifth season in the Royals' dugout. He's the first manager to lead the franchise the postseason since Dick Howser and the 1985 World Series championship team. Yost owns his share of rings as a member of the Atlanta Braves' staffs from 1991 through 2002, but his first managerial tenure in Milwaukee ended two weeks before the end of the 2008 regular season with the Brewers losing ground in the playoff chase.
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By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
Kansas City Royals manager Ned Yost, who was Orioles designated hitter Nelson Cruz's first manager with the Milwaukee Brewers, said the slugger has surpassed even Yost's high expectations for him since their time together in 2005. “I loved Nelson Cruz when he was there,” Yost said. “Nelly was right on the verge of becoming a special player at that time -- still struggling to make contact, but when he did make contact, it was loud contact. But you could tell down the road that he was going to be a big-time power hitter.” The Brewers, who Yost managed from 2003 to 2008, acquired Cruz from the Oakland Athletics in December 2004.
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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
Steve Buttry has been posting a series of articles at The Buttry Diary offering advice to top editors. All are instructive, but the latest, on dealing firmly with staff problems , is particularly valuable. If you are a manager at any level, you would do well to examine how he lays out various situations and how he suggests dealing with them. I append a few comments of my own. In journalism, most managers, regrettably, fall into two categories: bullies and cowards. This I have seen at two newspapers myself, and have heard reports from colleagues at scores of others.
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By Blair Kerkhoff and The Kansas City Star | October 8, 2014
Before he brushes his teeth in the morning these days, Royals manager Ned Yost reminds himself of one thing. “Before I even get out of bed, I tell myself, 'Let's have fun today,'” Yost said. “Remember where you're at and let's have fun.” These are the best of times for Yost, in his fifth season in the Royals' dugout. He's the first manager to lead the franchise the postseason since Dick Howser and the 1985 World Series championship team. Yost owns his share of rings as a member of the Atlanta Braves' staffs from 1991 through 2002, but his first managerial tenure in Milwaukee ended two weeks before the end of the 2008 regular season with the Brewers losing ground in the playoff chase.
SPORTS
By Adam Kilgore, The Washington Post | June 26, 2011
Davey Johnson, a former Orioles manager and player, will become the next manager of the Washington Nationals and will manage them at least through the 2011 season, general manager Mike Rizzo said on the national broadcast of Saturday's game against the Chicago White Sox. The move completes a surreal two days by placing one of the most accomplished managers of this generation at the helm of baseball's hottest team. Rizzo said the completion of Johnson's contract amounted to "dotting the i's and crossing the t's. " Rizzo also said Johnson will travel with the Nationals to Anaheim, Calif., where he will manage his first game Monday.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2012
William Bruce Schneck, former manager of space shuttle Columbia's communications network, died June 17 of a massive heart attack at Chester River Hospital Center in Chestertown. The Shady Side resident was 59. The son of a Glenn L. Martin Co. quality control engineer and a Baltimore public school cafeteria manager, Mr. Schneck was born in Baltimore and raised in Dundalk. He was a 1970 graduate of Patapsco High School, and after attending a Baltimore technical school for a year, went to work in 1972 for Honeywell Technology Solutions Inc. Mr. Schneck, a contract employee who worked at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt for more than 35 years, retired in 2005.
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By Mike Klingaman and Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2013
Earl Weaver penned his own epitaph. “On my tombstone just write, 'The sorest loser that ever lived,' “ he once said. Weaver, the Orioles' chain-smoking, umpire-baiting, tomato-growing manager who led the team to four American League pennants and the 1970 world championship in his 17 years here, died late Friday night while on a baseball-themed cruise. The Orioles confirmed his death Saturday morning but did not release a cause. The Hall of Famer, who lived in Pembroke Pines, Fla., was 82. “Earl Weaver stands alone as the greatest manager in the history of the Orioles organization and one of the greatest in the history of baseball,” Orioles owner Peter Angelos said in a statement.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
James F. Bray, a retired grocery store manager, died Tuesday of an aneurysm at his Jessup home. He was 76. Mr. Bray was born in Virginia and raised in North Carolina and Baltimore, where he graduated from city public schools. He served in the Army for three months and was honorably discharged in 1958. Mr. Bray worked for Food Fair and later as an evening grocery manager at Pantry Pride from 1952 to 1981, when he retired. During the 1980s, he worked for several years for Valu Food as a manager.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2012
Carey Howell Taylor, a retired Bethlehem Steel Corp. manager, died Jan. 27 of pneumonia at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 84. The son of the superintendent of secondary education for city public schools and a homemaker, Mr. Taylor was born in Baltimore and raised in Mount Washington. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1944, he studied engineering at the University of North Carolina and Penn State University for two years, before enlisting in the Navy in 1947. He then completed his education, earning a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering in 1950 from the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
January 9, 2014
As a good friend of Bishop Robinson, I read with interest Fred Rasmussen 's obituary of the former Baltimore City police chief ( "Bishop Lee Robinson Sr., city's first black police commissioner, dies at 86," Jan. 6). There was another part of Bishop's career that was omitted. For approximately 10 years, from the time he served as secretary of the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services until his 70th birthday, we were privileged to have him serve as a director of Mercantile Bankshares Corp.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Davey Johnson was the last Orioles manager to lead the team to the ALCS, and he managed four other clubs, including most recently the Washington Nationals. He seemed to pick Baltimore over his most recent stop in an MLB Network Radio interview this morning. Johnson was asked about seeing baseball revived in Baltimore, and said it's “wonderful” to see. “I think the best fans in baseball are right around that Baltimore area,” Johnson said. “Now we're getting baseball fans in Washington, which has mostly been a football town, but I love the people in that area.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2014
DETROIT - After his team completed a tense, 2-1 victory over the Detroit Tigers on Sunday to advance to the American League Championship Series, Orioles manager Buck Showalter was congratulated at the beginning of his postgame news conference for winning his first playoff series as a manager. “Really? I got one in Albany,” Showalter quipped, referring to an Eastern League crown in 1989. When the reporter specified he was talking about the majors, Showalter replied: “They're all relevant.” Fair enough.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Buck Showalter does not believe he's changed. Let's get that out of the way right off. In fact, he's suspicious of anyone applying a sweeping narrative of transformation to his current success as Orioles manager. "I think I'm just perceived different," he said in a hushed moment outside the clubhouse, three days after his team clinched its first American League East title since 1997. "It's funny how that changes. " The Orioles' 2014 postseason - which begins with Game 1 of the American League Division Series on Thursday against the Detroit Tigers - likely represents one of Showalter's last, best chances at managing in his first World Series.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Mary M. "Margie" Adams, who worked for a mortgage origination company and was a physical fitness enthusiast, died Friday at her Sparks home of a massive heart attack. She was 49. The daughter of Dr. Hector F. DiNardo Jr., a dentist, and Margaret Meekins DiNardo, a homemaker, Mary Margaret DiNardo was born in Baltimore and raised in Timonium. She was a 1983 graduate of Notre Dame Preparatory School and attended Marymount University and what is now McDaniel College. From 1987 to 1989, she was a medical scheduler at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center, and from 1989 to 1993 was a claims adjuster in the Owings Mills office of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Russell R. Jones, former general manager of Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Sparrows Point plant, died Wednesday of heart failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 90. The son of restaurant owners Russell Wehr Jones and Noelie Delores Richard Jones, Russell Richard Jones was born and raised in Lehighton, Pa., where he graduated in 1941 from high school. His college studies at Lehigh University were interrupted when he enlisted in the Army Air Forces, where he was trained as a bomber pilot and later trained B-29 pilots.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
John "Jack" M.E. Hasslinger Jr., an accountant who managed a well-known family seafood business, died of heart disease Tuesday at his Mount Airy home. He was 63. Born in Baltimore and raised on Jody Way in Timonium, he was the son of John M.E. Hasslinger Sr., a piano tuner and instructor, and the former Ellen Regina Cosgrove, a homemaker. He was a 1969 graduate of Loyola High School at Blakefield and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in business administration at Loyola University Maryland.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
John H. "Jack" Laporte Jr., a highly regarded T. Rowe Price portfolio manager who was also a philanthropist and one of the minority owners of the Orioles, died Aug. 12 of complications from lymphoma at his Ruxton home. He was 68. "Jack was one of the great investors of our era, and you never heard that from him. He never talked about it. He was a modest, cultural pillar of our company and a true gentleman," said Brian C. Rogers, T. Rowe Price's chairman and chief investment officer.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
Amelia J. Brooks, a retired store manager and active church member, died Feb. 16 from heart failure at a daughter's home in Buford, Ga. The former longtime West Baltimore resident was 90. The daughter of a cobbler and a housekeeper, the former Amelia Juanita Soden was born in Baltimore and raised near Harlem Park. Mrs. Brooks was a 1941 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School and at an early age began attending church at Union Baptist Church and Douglas Memorial Baptist Church.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | September 25, 2014
The Caves Valley Golf Club Foundation has established a five-year, $100,000 scholarship at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore for a student in the school's PGA Golf Management program. Demarkis Cooper (Oxon Hill) was named the first recipient. UMES is one of 18 schools to offer a PGA-approved degree in golf management, but the only historically black university with the program. The foundation is the philanthropic arm of the Owings Mills club, which hosted the LPGA's International Crown in late July.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
NEW YORK - When the Yankee Stadium crowd began chanting New York Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter's name after his final at-bat Wednesday after a routine groundout - trying to coax the future Hall of Famer out of the dugout - Orioles manager Buck Showalter knew it wasn't happening. It wasn't the right time. “He had a tough at-bat, a ground ball back to the pitcher,” Showalter said, “I told a couple of our guys, 'He ain't coming out of the dugout. Just watch.' That's all you need to know about Derek because it didn't fit in the context of what was [happening]
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