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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
Steve Buttry has been posting a series of articles at The Buttry Diary offering advice to top editors. All are instructive, but the latest, on dealing firmly with staff problems , is particularly valuable. If you are a manager at any level, you would do well to examine how he lays out various situations and how he suggests dealing with them. I append a few comments of my own. In journalism, most managers, regrettably, fall into two categories: bullies and cowards. This I have seen at two newspapers myself, and have heard reports from colleagues at scores of others.
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SPORTS
By James Wagner, The Washington Post | August 19, 2014
After a fantastic first half of the season, the Washington Nationals' Rafael Soriano hasn't been the same in the second. He has allowed 10 runs over his past 112/3 innings since the All-Star break. He also has blown three saves, including one Sunday. He has been scored on in three of his past four outings. Soriano still has 29 saves, and his ERA is still only 2.59 ERA, but his five blown saves are tied for fourth most in the National League. His recent rough stretch and struggles with command have raised questions for manager Matt Williams.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2012
William Bruce Schneck, former manager of space shuttle Columbia's communications network, died June 17 of a massive heart attack at Chester River Hospital Center in Chestertown. The Shady Side resident was 59. The son of a Glenn L. Martin Co. quality control engineer and a Baltimore public school cafeteria manager, Mr. Schneck was born in Baltimore and raised in Dundalk. He was a 1970 graduate of Patapsco High School, and after attending a Baltimore technical school for a year, went to work in 1972 for Honeywell Technology Solutions Inc. Mr. Schneck, a contract employee who worked at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt for more than 35 years, retired in 2005.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
Henry B. Mann Jr., a retired Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. marketing manager and World War II veteran, died Aug. 4 of complications from dementia at Envoy of Denton, a nursing home. He was 93. The son of Henry B. Mann Sr., an attorney, and Amelia R. Mann, a homemaker, Henry Bond Mann Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised on Evergreen Avenue in Hamilton. After graduating in 1938 from Polytechnic Institute, Mr. Mann began working for C&P Telephone. In 1942, he enlisted in the Army and served with Company B, 53rd Signal Battalion in Europe.
SPORTS
By Adam Kilgore, The Washington Post | June 26, 2011
Davey Johnson, a former Orioles manager and player, will become the next manager of the Washington Nationals and will manage them at least through the 2011 season, general manager Mike Rizzo said on the national broadcast of Saturday's game against the Chicago White Sox. The move completes a surreal two days by placing one of the most accomplished managers of this generation at the helm of baseball's hottest team. Rizzo said the completion of Johnson's contract amounted to "dotting the i's and crossing the t's. " Rizzo also said Johnson will travel with the Nationals to Anaheim, Calif., where he will manage his first game Monday.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2013
Earl Weaver penned his own epitaph. “On my tombstone just write, 'The sorest loser that ever lived,' “ he once said. Weaver, the Orioles' chain-smoking, umpire-baiting, tomato-growing manager who led the team to four American League pennants and the 1970 world championship in his 17 years here, died late Friday night while on a baseball-themed cruise. The Orioles confirmed his death Saturday morning but did not release a cause. The Hall of Famer, who lived in Pembroke Pines, Fla., was 82. “Earl Weaver stands alone as the greatest manager in the history of the Orioles organization and one of the greatest in the history of baseball,” Orioles owner Peter Angelos said in a statement.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
James F. Bray, a retired grocery store manager, died Tuesday of an aneurysm at his Jessup home. He was 76. Mr. Bray was born in Virginia and raised in North Carolina and Baltimore, where he graduated from city public schools. He served in the Army for three months and was honorably discharged in 1958. Mr. Bray worked for Food Fair and later as an evening grocery manager at Pantry Pride from 1952 to 1981, when he retired. During the 1980s, he worked for several years for Valu Food as a manager.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2012
Carey Howell Taylor, a retired Bethlehem Steel Corp. manager, died Jan. 27 of pneumonia at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 84. The son of the superintendent of secondary education for city public schools and a homemaker, Mr. Taylor was born in Baltimore and raised in Mount Washington. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1944, he studied engineering at the University of North Carolina and Penn State University for two years, before enlisting in the Navy in 1947. He then completed his education, earning a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering in 1950 from the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
January 9, 2014
As a good friend of Bishop Robinson, I read with interest Fred Rasmussen 's obituary of the former Baltimore City police chief ( "Bishop Lee Robinson Sr., city's first black police commissioner, dies at 86," Jan. 6). There was another part of Bishop's career that was omitted. For approximately 10 years, from the time he served as secretary of the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services until his 70th birthday, we were privileged to have him serve as a director of Mercantile Bankshares Corp.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
John H. "Jack" Laporte Jr., a highly regarded T. Rowe Price portfolio manager who was also a philanthropist and one of the minority owners of the Orioles, died Aug. 12 of complications from lymphoma at his Ruxton home. He was 68. "Jack was one of the great investors of our era, and you never heard that from him. He never talked about it. He was a modest, cultural pillar of our company and a true gentleman," said Brian C. Rogers, T. Rowe Price's chairman and chief investment officer.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
William S. Jeffries, who rose from a clerk at Alex. Brown & Sons to managing director and partner in the venerable Baltimore financial firm, died Aug. 8 of complications from dementia at Arden Courts of Towson. The longtime Ruxton resident was 88. "Bill was the consummate professional and gentleman. He was boss, mentor, confidant and as the years passed, a wonderful lifelong friend to so many of us at Alex. Brown," said Mike Connelly, a retired managing director and partner at Alex.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Manny Machado admits that he feared the worst when he fell to the ground at home plate Monday night, holding his right knee and writhing in pain in the batter's box. The moment brought back memories for Machado of last September, when his other knee buckled as he hit first base, ending his year with an injury that required offseason surgery and forced him to miss the first month this season. And even though the Orioles placed their third baseman on the 15-day disabled list Wednesday, the team's diagnosis of a knee ligament sprain was met with relief.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
A federal council took a preliminary step Monday toward protecting deep-sea corals off Maryland and the rest of the mid-Atlantic coast. The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council voted unanimously to seek public input on what should be done to prevent commercial fishing gear from damaging the fragile, slow-growing corals, about which until recently little was known. Research cruises over the past few years have documented their presence in several of the many deep canyons cutting into the eastern edge of the continental shelf, about 70 miles off the coast.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2014
Buck Showalter has been frustrated by the ambiguity of baseball's new replay review system, so when a call was overturned against the Orioles in the seventh inning of the club's 8-3 loss to the St. Louis Cardinals on Sunday afternoon, the manager wanted some answers. When an initial forceout call at second base - Jonathan Schoop lost the ball on the exchange to his throwing hand - was overturned after a challenge by the Cardinals, Showalter jumped out of the dugout, headed toward the umpires and emphatically gestured that he wanted the headset to talk to the replay officials who reversed the call in New York.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Annapolis has a new acting city manager. David Jarrell, the city's director of public works. Jarrell, who has been in charge of public works since 2010, is taking over the city manager's position while the city continues the search for a permanent city manager, Mayor Mike Pantelides announced. Jarrell replaces the most recent acting city manager, Brian Woodward, who resigned at the end of July. Woodward was also the city's recreation and parks director. Since Pantelides took office in December, Annapolis has lost its city attorney, city manager, assistant city manager, planning director, transportation director and recreation and parks director through resignations and firings.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
Criticism of President Barack Obama's nominee to lead the Social Security Administration appeared to evaporate Thursday at a confirmation hearing that featured few questions about controversial service cuts and recent allegations of mismanagement. Carolyn W. Colvin's hearing before the Senate Finance Committee - which took place hours ahead of a scheduled monthlong recess - drew only two Republicans and lasted less than an hour, an indication the Maryland native might face an easier path to the job than initially expected.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
Amelia J. Brooks, a retired store manager and active church member, died Feb. 16 from heart failure at a daughter's home in Buford, Ga. The former longtime West Baltimore resident was 90. The daughter of a cobbler and a housekeeper, the former Amelia Juanita Soden was born in Baltimore and raised near Harlem Park. Mrs. Brooks was a 1941 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School and at an early age began attending church at Union Baptist Church and Douglas Memorial Baptist Church.
NEWS
By Matt Vensel | June 13, 2011
You know those amazing videos we see of minor-league managers flipping out and getting ejected from games in emphatic fashion ? We can now add Norfolk Tides manager Gary Allenson to the highlight reel. In Sunday’s 11-5 win over Durham, the manager of the Orioles’ Triple-A affiliate took objection to a home run getting switched to a ground-rule double by the umps. So Allenson sauntered out to the warning track, scaled the outfield wall and started looking for more phantom ground-rule doubles in the shrubbery in center field.
NEWS
By Anwer Hasan | July 29, 2014
Student debt has grown to over $1 trillion in the United States and is continuing to climb. In fact, seven out of 10 undergraduates graduated with some form of student debt in 2012. Such enormous debt is likely to trigger another financial crisis as young adults and recent graduates struggle to pay back their loans. The federal, state and local governments have taken a number of steps to provide aid in the form of scholarships, grants, loans and repayment assistance programs. In Maryland, for example, the state's Janet L. Hoffman Loan Assistance Repayment Program provides loan repayment assistance for graduates working in high needs areas in targeted fields such as medicine, education and law. In Fiscal Year 2013, 193 awards were made through that program; loan repayments totaled more than $1.2 million, with an average award of roughly $6,400 per recipient.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
They call them the unwritten rules of baseball, but Orioles manager Buck Showalter obviously thinks even unwritten rules are made to be broken. He ordered an intentional walk to slumping Bryce Harper in the eighth inning Thursday night, even though the Washington Nationals left fielder represented the potential go-ahead run in a one-run ballgame. That's a classic no-no if you believe in old-school managerial strategy, but Showalter turned baseball convention on its ear, and did it with an opposing hitter who came to the plate with just one hit in his past 20 at-bats.
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