Advertisement
HomeCollectionsManager
IN THE NEWS

Manager

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karmen Fox and For The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
Don's on the mend. Sort of. It was an admittedly slow yet steady start to the new season. That's how it should be with recovery. There was no jumping into massive transformations or profound moments of clarity. It was more of a catch-up to see how the dust has settled - or kicked up - in the past two months (in "Mad Men" time, of course). Are Don and Megan still together? Have SC&P rehired Don? Are Peggy and Joan this close to starting their firm to prove those chauvinists wrong?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2014
To better account for hundreds of millions of grant dollars, Baltimore finance officials have a plan to overhaul city policies, train staff and keep records in a centralized database. Harry E. Black, the city's finance director, said the project should take about a year to complete and cost between $300,000 and $500,000. The city also has hired a grants coordinator to oversee the money, which accounted for about 13 percent of the budget last year, or $332 million. "Whatever we receive, we want to make certain it's aligned with the city's priorities and goals and that we are managing this process and the funds … in the most efficient and effective way," Black said.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2013
Earl Weaver penned his own epitaph. “On my tombstone just write, 'The sorest loser that ever lived,' “ he once said. Weaver, the Orioles' chain-smoking, umpire-baiting, tomato-growing manager who led the team to four American League pennants and the 1970 world championship in his 17 years here, died late Friday night while on a baseball-themed cruise. The Orioles confirmed his death Saturday morning but did not release a cause. The Hall of Famer, who lived in Pembroke Pines, Fla., was 82. “Earl Weaver stands alone as the greatest manager in the history of the Orioles organization and one of the greatest in the history of baseball,” Orioles owner Peter Angelos said in a statement.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2014
Ralph Dawson Matthews Jr., a former managing editor of the Baltimore Afro-American who worked closely with Malcolm X in the early 1960s and once shared a house with a young Miles Davis, died April 3 at the Adelphi House assisted living facility in Adelphi, Prince George's County. Mr. Dawson died of complications from chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, or COPD. He was 86. "Ralph was always very inquisitive," remembered Harry Peaker, a retired mathematician who grew up with Mr. Matthews in Northwest Baltimore.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
Steve Buttry has been posting a series of articles at The Buttry Diary offering advice to top editors. All are instructive, but the latest, on dealing firmly with staff problems , is particularly valuable. If you are a manager at any level, you would do well to examine how he lays out various situations and how he suggests dealing with them. I append a few comments of my own. In journalism, most managers, regrettably, fall into two categories: bullies and cowards. This I have seen at two newspapers myself, and have heard reports from colleagues at scores of others.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2012
William Bruce Schneck, former manager of space shuttle Columbia's communications network, died June 17 of a massive heart attack at Chester River Hospital Center in Chestertown. The Shady Side resident was 59. The son of a Glenn L. Martin Co. quality control engineer and a Baltimore public school cafeteria manager, Mr. Schneck was born in Baltimore and raised in Dundalk. He was a 1970 graduate of Patapsco High School, and after attending a Baltimore technical school for a year, went to work in 1972 for Honeywell Technology Solutions Inc. Mr. Schneck, a contract employee who worked at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt for more than 35 years, retired in 2005.
SPORTS
By Adam Kilgore, The Washington Post | June 26, 2011
Davey Johnson, a former Orioles manager and player, will become the next manager of the Washington Nationals and will manage them at least through the 2011 season, general manager Mike Rizzo said on the national broadcast of Saturday's game against the Chicago White Sox. The move completes a surreal two days by placing one of the most accomplished managers of this generation at the helm of baseball's hottest team. Rizzo said the completion of Johnson's contract amounted to "dotting the i's and crossing the t's. " Rizzo also said Johnson will travel with the Nationals to Anaheim, Calif., where he will manage his first game Monday.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
James F. Bray, a retired grocery store manager, died Tuesday of an aneurysm at his Jessup home. He was 76. Mr. Bray was born in Virginia and raised in North Carolina and Baltimore, where he graduated from city public schools. He served in the Army for three months and was honorably discharged in 1958. Mr. Bray worked for Food Fair and later as an evening grocery manager at Pantry Pride from 1952 to 1981, when he retired. During the 1980s, he worked for several years for Valu Food as a manager.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2012
Carey Howell Taylor, a retired Bethlehem Steel Corp. manager, died Jan. 27 of pneumonia at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 84. The son of the superintendent of secondary education for city public schools and a homemaker, Mr. Taylor was born in Baltimore and raised in Mount Washington. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1944, he studied engineering at the University of North Carolina and Penn State University for two years, before enlisting in the Navy in 1947. He then completed his education, earning a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering in 1950 from the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
January 9, 2014
As a good friend of Bishop Robinson, I read with interest Fred Rasmussen 's obituary of the former Baltimore City police chief ( "Bishop Lee Robinson Sr., city's first black police commissioner, dies at 86," Jan. 6). There was another part of Bishop's career that was omitted. For approximately 10 years, from the time he served as secretary of the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services until his 70th birthday, we were privileged to have him serve as a director of Mercantile Bankshares Corp.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2014
DETROIT -- Orioles manager Buck Showalter said during spring training that left fielder David Lough could be eased, at some point, into the leadoff role against right-handers. Six games into the season, Lough has started four times and batted first twice - in consecutive games against right-handers Saturday and Sunday - after hitting second in his first two starts of the year. Showalter hasn't committed to the speedy Lough as the permanent leadoff hitter yet, instead of right fielder Nick Markakis, but it looks like it could end up that way. “It's an option.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2014
Sondra Harrison McGee, who co-owned and managed her family's Pier Five seafood restaurant on Pratt Street, died of a heart attack March 17 at her Marco Island, Fla., home. She was 71 and had lived in the Hampton section of Towson. Born on Tilghman Island, she was the daughter of Levin F. Harrison Jr. and Alice Garvin Harrison, who owned and operated Harrison's Chesapeake House. Her father was a charter fishing boat operator and her mother ran the popular Eastern Shore summer hotel and restaurant.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
In Annapolis, where there is no city manager or assistant city manager, the recreation and parks director will fill in as city manager. Mayor Mike Pantelides announced Friday that parks director Brian Woodward will be acting city manager while the search continues for a permanent manager. The city's previous city manager, Michael Mallinoff, was fired by the new mayor in January. Then assistant city manager Virginia Burke, who served as acting city manager, resigned. Her last day was Friday.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Zachary "Zach" Lederer used to say he was "living the dream. " Even as his physical health deteriorated in the final year of his life, he told others he felt fantastic. Hundreds of people gathered Friday afternoon to remember the former manager of the Maryland men's basketball team, who died March 11 of brain cancer. The 20-year-old inspired cancer patients across the globe with his signature pose of pumping his fists with flexed biceps - a move that the crowd gathered at the Church of the Resurrection mimicked together in the pews during his memorial.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. -- Covering Buck Showalter is often an eye opener. His reputation of being exceptionally prepared and detail-oriented is usually right on. Case in point: Monday's schedule, looming bad weather and Showalter's shell game to try and guarantee that Orioles right-hander Ubaldo Jimenez will pitch four or five innings. The forecast is calling for rain all day in the Sarasota area, but prospects are a little better for some sun further south on the West Coast of Florida.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. - Both of the Orioles' split-squad games Monday were canceled due to a persistent rain in Florida, and neither will be made up. The afternoon game in Clearwater against the Philadelphia Phillies was canceled, and then, a few hours later, the Orioles announced they wouldn't be playing their night game at Ed Smith Stadium against the Minnesota Twins. The double rainout could have been a real problem for the Orioles' pitching staff, but manager Buck Showalter and club officials already had contingencies in place.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
Sarah J. "Sally" O'Conor, a retired branch manager for BSI Temporaries and a former longtime Ruxton resident, died Jan. 28 of complications from a stroke at the Life Care Center of Acton in Massachusetts. She was 88. The daughter of William A. McLaren Sr., an attorney and former executive vice president of Druid Ridge Cemetery Co., and Lillie G. Wolf McLaren, a homemaker, the former Sarah Josephine McLaren was born in Baltimore and raised in Mount Washington. She was the great-granddaughter of Isaac Stewart George, who had been president of Trader's Bank in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
Amelia J. Brooks, a retired store manager and active church member, died Feb. 16 from heart failure at a daughter's home in Buford, Ga. The former longtime West Baltimore resident was 90. The daughter of a cobbler and a housekeeper, the former Amelia Juanita Soden was born in Baltimore and raised near Harlem Park. Mrs. Brooks was a 1941 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School and at an early age began attending church at Union Baptist Church and Douglas Memorial Baptist Church.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
Two springs ago, Orioles right-hander Chris Tillman was desperately trying to prove he could pitch in the major leagues. Last year at this time, he was attempting to show he was healthy and wasn't a fluke. And this March? Well, Tillman is now preparing to throw the first pitch of the Orioles' 2014 season at Camden Yards on March 31 against the defending World Series champion Boston Red Sox. “Any time you get the chance to get that kind of opportunity it's a big deal,” Tillman said of being named the club's Opening Day starter.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.